Oct 29, 2020  
Spring 2019 Catalog 
    
Spring 2019 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 Key to Course Descriptions

 Course Description

Abbreviations
 

(C) City Campus F/S Fall and Spring
(N) North Campus SS Summer Session
(S) South Campus F+ Offered every other Fall
F Fall S+ Offered every other Spring
S Spring N Non-Credit

 

Course Outlines

Course outlines for all courses described in this catalog are available for viewing. To explore the general framework of a course design and view the expectations of student performance within a select course click on the link below. These descriptions provide the base upon which instructors build their own course syllabi for the individual sections offered by the academic departments. Individual sections may therefore vary somewhat from the descriptions given in the outlines.

Course Outlines

 

Mechanical Engineering Technology

  
  •  

    ME 272 - Applied Thermodynamics


    Credit Hours: 3

    Basic principles of thermodynamics as applied to the analysis of prime mover power cycles, refrigeration, air conditioning and heat exchanger equipment. Topics include the definition of heat, work, energy, power, first and second laws of thermodynamics, properties of sub-cooled liquids, saturated and superheated vapors, use of steam tables and ideal gases.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • understand and use the fundamentals of thermodynamics; and
    • be prepared for heat power and refrigeration, which are required in the application of thermodynamics.


    Prerequisites: MT 121 or MT 125 or permission of the instructor.
    F (N)

  
  •  

    ME 280 - Fluid Power


    Credit Hours: 2

    A broad, general, and practical coverage of fluid power technology intended to acquaint students with basic design, functions and applications of fluid power components and systems in the area of hydraulics and pneumatics.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course and lab, the student will be able to:

    • relate the principles of fluid mechanics and energy transfer to fluid power applications;
    • identify the A.N.S.I.; national fluid power symbols and analyze fundamental circuits;
    • formulate with theory, the solutions to problems of practical fluid power in industry;
    • be able to use computer solutions for these applications;
    • be able to setup the fluid power lab apparatus and take measurements; and
    • write technical reports.


    Prerequisites: MT121 or MT125
    Concurrent Registration: ME 281 or permission of the instructor.
    S (N)

  
  •  

    ME 281 - Lab for ME 280


    Credit Hours: 1

    Laboratory experiences include demonstrations of fluid principles, study of industrial components, design and testing of basic circuitry.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course and lab, the student will be able to:

    • relate the principles of fluid mechanics and energy transfer to fluid power applications;
    • identify the A.N.S.I., national fluid power symbols and analyze fundamental circuits;
    • formulate with theory, the solutions to problems of practical fluid power in industry;
    • be able to use computer solutions for these applications;
    • be able to setup and operate laboratory equipment pertaining to fluid power theory and take measurements; and
    • write technical reports.


    Concurrent Registration: ME 280 or permission of the instructor.
    S (N)

  
  •  

    ME 282 - Heat, Power and Refrigeration


    Credit Hours: 2

    An introduction to heat power cycles and equipment, which includes understanding of heat transfer and heat exchangers. The course starts with heating and cooling load calculation of buildings. Power cycles such as Rankine (steam power plants), Otto, Diesel and Bryton (gas turbine) are discussed and analyzed. Also included are the topics of reversed cycles, psychrometry, refrigerants and refrigeration systems.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course and lab, the student will be able to:

    • understand the applications of thermodynamics and thermal science;
    • develop profound understanding of thermodynamics;
    • use software for problem solving and writing a report;
    • setup and operate laboratory equipment pertaining to heat power and refrigeration and take measurements; and
    • write technical reports.

     

    Prerequisites: MT 121 or MT 125
    Concurrent Registration: ME 283 or permission of the instructor.
    S (N)

  
  •  

    ME 283 - Lab for ME 282


    Credit Hours: 1

    Lab activities supplement the course subjects. Several lab activities are used to clarify the course contents.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course and lab, the student will be able to:

    • understand the applications of thermodynamics and thermal science;
    • develop profound understanding of thermodynamics;
    • use software for problem solving and writing a report;
    • setup and operate laboratory equipment pertaining to heat power and refrigeration and take measurements; and
    • write technical reports.


    Concurrent Registration: ME 282 or permission of the instructor.
    S (N)

  
  •  

    ME 288 - Basic Electricity for Mechanical Equipment


    Credit Hours: 3

    The course reviews basic electricity using phasor diagram to solve circuits with resistance, inductance and capacitance. Computer software is applied to solve basic electronic circuits. Theory of transformers, delta and Y connections are discussed. Theory of motors and generators are reviewed. The application of AC motors and DC motors are discussed.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • understand basic AC and DC circuit theory;
    • understand basic control and power distribution as supplied in the field of mechanical equipment;
    • become acquainted with the purpose use, and operation of contactors, starters, types of motor controls, and circuitry pertaining to mechanical equipment;
    • setup and operate laboratory equipment pertaining to electricity;
    • write technical reports; and
    • use computer software to solve and analyze electronic power and control circuits.


    Prerequisites: MT 121 or MT 125 or permission of the instructor.
    S (N)

  
  •  

    ME 290 - Machine Design


    Credit Hours: 2

    The course is about the analysis and design of machines and machine elements under tensile, shear, torsion, flexure, combined stress, impact and fatigue loading. Emphasis is on the design procedure, sizing of parts, use of strength of materials and the use of manufacturers catalogs in design and in the selection of standard parts. Typical elements studied could be keys, gears, belts, chains, fasteners, springs, bearings, welds, linkages, shafts, columns, couplings, clutches, brakes and cams.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • write technical reports;
    • enable the student to make safe yet economical calculations for typical machine elements made of common engineering materials; and
    • utilize computer applications (Finite Element Analysis, FEA) to design parts and problem solving.


    Prerequisites: MT 121 or MT 125, ME 104 or permission of the instructor.
    Concurrent Registration: ME 291 or permission of the instructor.
    S (N)

  
  •  

    ME 291 - Lab for ME 290


    Credit Hours: 1

    The projects in this lab will be student driven and will be done as a capstone. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) will be introduced as a possible mean for students to perform the necessary Stress/Deformation Analysis. Several machine design projects will be completed to review the subjects covered in the machine design course. A few stress analysis cases will be carried out using Algor software.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • write technical reports;
    • enable the student to make safe yet economical calculations for typical machine elements made of common engineering materials;
    • utilize computer applications (Finite Element Analysis, FEA) to design parts and problem solving;
    • utilize a Capstone experience to complete a project by himself and the knowledge obtained in various courses; and
    • use industrial catalogs for design and selection of standard stock parts.


    Prerequisites: MT 121 or MT 125, ME 104 or permission of the instructor.
    Concurrent Registration: ME 290 or permission of the instructor.
    S (N)

  
  •  

    ME 298 - Mechanical Engineering Technology Internship or Technical Elective


    Credit Hours: 3

    This internship is designed to provide realistic, hands-on training by companies in the field of mechanical engineering technology. This work experience, along with the academic program, will enable the students to prepare for entrance into a competitive work environment. Additionally, the internship experience will create potential employment opportunities and a bond between the student, the college and the engineering technology community.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • function effectively on teams;
    • communicate effectively; utilize oral/written skills to communicate effectively in an engineering technology workplace; develop communicative skills essential for procuring a position, including resume, interview and related communications; understand the communication process and its roles in interpersonal communication and written correspondence;
    • complete a job application package (cover letter, resume, etc.) and demonstrate effective job search and interview skills;
    • recognize the need for, and an ability to engage in lifelong learning;
    • understand professional ethical and social responsibilities;
    • appreciate the respect for diversity and acknowledge contemporary professional, societal and global issues;
    • commit to quality, timeliness and continuous improvement;
    • apply basic mechanical engineering technology skills on the job; assist engineers, technologists, and technicians in the performance of various assignments which may involve fluid power, instrumentation, thermodynamics, electric machine systems, and machine design;
    • demonstrate effective use of time and ability to manage stress; and
    • identify and utilize effective human relation skills; demonstrate ability to accept and utilize constructive criticism to improve performance in the workplace; demonstrate ability to assess his/her job performance and personal habits as they relate to the workplace.


    Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum, 21 MET credit hours minimum and MET faculty recommendations.
    S (N)


Medical Office Assistant

  
  •  

    MA 112 - Medical Law and Ethics


    Credit Hours: 3

    The student will be introduced to human value development, the decision-making process, and the foundation of the U.S. legal system.  Issues such as licensure and certification, managed care, and medical records, as well as patient and physician rights and responsibilities will be covered. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act (PPACA), and other laws pertaining to the medical workplace are presented. Medical contracts, tort law, professional liability and medical malpractice, as well as defense to liability lawsuits will be integrated into class discussions.

    Ethical and bioethical topics in medicine, such as cloning, gene therapy, stem cell research, organ and tissue donation/transplantation, advanced directives, euthanasia, human development, and death and dying will be discussed as they apply to the roles of various healthcare professionals. Case studies and video presentations will be used to enhance classroom dialogs on ethical theories including deontology, utilitarianism, virtue ethics, and others, which will be applied to the analysis of contemporary bioethical issues as per an instructor-defined schedule, and will be included in an end-of-term research paper.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • explain human value development and examine the common theories and methods used in making value decisions;
    • understand the historical background of rights and reasoning and the basic principles of health care ethics;
    • describe the basics of the judicial system, including the sources of law, public and private law, and the court system;
    • explain licensure and certification as it applies to health care professionals;
    • define and explain both the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA) and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) and their importance in health care today;
    • define the doctor-patient relationship;
    • explain the medical professional's role in providing confidentiality in professional relationships;
    • describe the difference of the expressed and the implied contracts between physician and patient;
    • define negligence and other medical-legal terms as they relate to the standard of medical care;
    • recognize the role the medical professional has in maintaining medical records and their importance in defenses to professional liability suits;
    • describe intentional torts and criminal offenses;
    • define public duties and responsibilities and categorize the allocation of resources;
    • explain employment safety and rights as well as those laws protecting consumers;
    • define ethics;
    • apply the principles of medical ethics as they relate to the American Medical Association and evaluate the implications for the practicing physician;
    • discuss the theories of Maslow, Erikson and Kubler-Ross;
    • discuss attitudes toward death and dying, including hospice and palliative care, euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide as well as the use of advanced directives;
    • discuss healthcare as it relates to patients of other cultures (transcultural health care);
    • define and apply the code of ethics for the various health professions; and
    • apply the ethical approaches of deontology, utilitarianism, virtue ethics and others to bioethical issues such as assisted reproduction; genetic engineering; stem cell research; organ donation; transplantation; and other contemporary issues in healthcare.


    Prerequisites: Pre-requisite: Completion of all developmental English
    Corequisites: EN 110
    F/S (N)

  
  •  

    MA 115 - Medical Terminology I


    Credit Hours: 3

    A course for health sciences professionals designed to provide skill in understanding and using medical terms. This course introduces fundamentals of word analysis, orientation to the body as a whole and common prefixes and suffixes. Anatomic and physiologic terminology, pathologic terminology, clinical procedures, laboratory tests, abbreviations and correct spelling and pronunciation of medical terms relating to the body systems are stressed. Many body systems are included, such as digestive, urinary, male and female reproductive, nervous and cardiovascular systems.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • identify and define prefixes, suffixes and word roots;
    • spell and use medical terms correctly;
    • build the medical terms given definitions;
    • analyze and define medical terms; and
    • demonstrate understanding of medical terms as used in sentences, paragraphs, medical texts and case studies.


    Prerequisites: Completion of all developmental English coursework.
    F/S (N)

  
  •  

    MA 117 - Medical Administrative Practice I


    Credit Hours: 3

    A study of medical office communications with a focus on written correspondence, telephone techniques, non-verbal messages, therapeutic communication strategies, meeting agenda and minutes preparation, patient education resources, business travel arrangements and processing incoming/outgoing mail. Direct writing style for a specific purpose will be emphasized. Use of proper medical terminology, abbreviations, acronyms, eponyms and sound-alike words will be integrated into sentence structure and proofreading. Use of library reference materials, internet and online databases will be used to conduct medical research on a health topic of interest. The impact of technologies on oral and written communication will be addressed.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • apply non-verbal communication skills by interpreting body language and recognizing barriers to effective communication;
    • demonstrate active listening, reflection, restatement and clarification of therapeutic techniques when communicating with patients;
    • write correspondence with the purpose to inform, promote goodwill, respond to a request and/or educate the patient in a medical office environment;
    • create patient education/community resources pamphlets, referencing medical dictionaries, library materials and/or online databases to clarify medical terminology, abbreviations, eponyms and acronyms used in medical correspondence;
    • apply professional telephone procedures used in a medical office including triage, screening, directing and prioritizing calls;
    • participate in a business meeting; prepare minutes and agendas;
    • create a travel itinerary for a medical conference; and
    • learn techniques for processing incoming and outgoing mail in medical offices.


    Prerequisites: Completion of all developmental English courses.
    Corequisites: EN 110
    F/S (N)

  
  •  

    MA 119 - Medical Documentation I


    Credit Hours: 1

    Students will practice using computer hardware, software, and peripherals for the medical office. Use of the Microsoft Windows operating system to organize medical documents into appropriate folders and subfolders, use of search tools to find programs, folders and files, and customization of the desktop will be covered. Microsoft Word applications will be applied when formatting a variety of medical documents including medical reports and forms, medical manuscripts, letters, and memos. Students will use mail merge functions, work with templates, create fill-in patient forms, patient education flyers, and format medical facility newsletters.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate knowledge of computer equipment and the basic parts of the computer hardware, software, and peripherals;
    • apply Windows functions when organizing files and folders;
    • format and edit documents using intermediate-level Word techniques;
    • apply Microsoft Word keyboard shortcuts to medical business letters, reports, memos, and tables;
    • create patient mail merge letters with fill-in fields, envelopes, and labels;
    • design patient update form templates with password protection; and
    • create and format tables to summarize health information.


    Corequisites: OF 102 (Note: Students keyboarding less than 35 wpm need to take OF 102 as a co-requisite)
    F/S (N)

  
  •  

    MA 125 - Medical Terminology II


    Credit Hours: 3

    A course for health sciences professionals designed to provide skill in understanding and using medical terms. This course is a continuation of MA 115. Anatomic and physiologic terminology, pathologic terminology, clinical procedures, laboratory tests, abbreviations and correct pronunciation and spelling of medical terms relating to the body systems are stressed. Included are the respiratory, hematologic, lymphatic, musculoskeletal, integumentary, ophthalmic, otic and endocrine systems along with specialized areas of oncology, radiology, nuclear medicine, radiation therapy, pharmacology and psychiatry.  

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • identify and define prefixes, suffixes and word roots;
    • spell and use medical terms correctly;
    • build the medical terms given definitions;
    • analyze and define medical terms; and
    • demonstrate understanding of medical terms as used in sentences, paragraphs, medical texts and case studies.


    Prerequisites: MA 115 or permission of the instructor.
    F/S (N)

  
  •  

    MA 126 - Clinical Office Procedures


    Credit Hours: 4

    A lecture/laboratory course which is designed to provide the medical assistant with entry-level skills in clinical office procedures. Instruction includes fundamentals of patient care as practiced in a medical office during examination and treatment. Laboratory sessions provide practice in: organizing the examination or treatment area before, during and after patient care; procedures for sanitization, disinfection and sterilization; adhering to the OSHA standard, recording subjective and objective patient data; procedures for patient positioning and draping; measuring and recording vital signs; performing eye and ear procedures; assisting the physician with the examination, treatment and minor surgery; instructing patients in the preparation for x-ray and diagnostic imaging procedures; and identifying surgical instruments.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • describe and demonstrate medical aseptic practices that should be followed in a medical office;
    • demonstrate the proper procedures for taking the vital signs of temperature, pulse, respiration, pulsoximetry, and blood pressure;
    • collect data from the patient for use in the health history, take height and weight measurements, demonstrate proper placement and draping of a patient, and proper assisting techniques during the physical examination;
    • demonstrate proper procedure for weighing and measuring the pediatric patient and growth chart plotting;
    • demonstrate proper procedure for testing distance and near visual acuity and assessing color vision; perform an eye and ear irrigation and eye and ear instillation;
    • demonstrate proper procedure for sanitizing office instruments, sterilizing articles using moist heat, and chemical disinfection;
    • demonstrate proficiency in performing sterile dressing change;
    • name and identify instruments used in minor office surgery and demonstrate proper use of each while maintaining a sterile field, and proper procedure for assisting in minor office surgery;
    • describe patient preparation required for each of the following types of x-ray examinations: barium meal, barium enema, cholecystography, intravenous pyelography, colonoscopy, and diagnostic imaging procedures;
    • enter patient information on medical chart;
    • apply proper medical terminology in all of the above areas;
    • explain the purpose of OSHA and identify OSHA guidelines;
    • project a professional manner through professional appearance, attendance and promptness for class; and
    • work as a team member.


    Prerequisites: BI 147, BI 150/BI 151, MA 115
    Corequisites: MA 125, BI 152.
    F/S (N)

  
  •  

    MA 128 - Medical Administrative Practice II


    Credit Hours: 3

    Students will learn entry-level medical office administrative procedures including front desk reception, patient scheduling, medical chart preparation, office policies and procedures, manual creation, accounts payable, banking documents and financial transactions. Emphasis is on practical application of administrative techniques. This is a hybrid course where MediSoft practice management software and Microsoft Word software programs will be routinely used.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • schedule new and established patient appointments;
    • register new patients and manage patient medical records;
    • create office policy and procedure manual;
    • define medical insurance and coding terminology;
    • perform basic accounting entries for a medical office including debits, credits, adjustments, accounts receivable and accounts payable;
    • complete insurance claims forms;
    • process essential financial records such as bookkeeping and banking; and
    • use time management techniques to prioritize tasks.


    Prerequisites: MA 117 or permission of instructor
    F/S (N)

  
  •  

    MA 216 - Clinical Diagnostic Orientation


    Credit Hours: 4

    A laboratory course which is designed to provide the medical assistant with entry-level skills in diagnostic laboratory orientation. Patient education for all procedures will be emphasized. Laboratory sessions provide practice in proper procedures for patient preparation, collection, handling, storage and/or transportation of clinical specimens; laboratory testing procedures including reference ranges and their clinical significance; quality control; and aseptic practices. Fundamentals of the purposes and techniques including: special examination, recording of electrocardiogram, recording spirometry, administration of medications, and phlebotomy are presented.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
     

    • list examples of biologic specimens and describe proper procedures for collection, handling, storage, and/or transport of these specimens;
    • instruct a patient in the prior preparation necessary and in what to expect during the collection of the specimen;
    • perform venipuncture on training arm using appropriate anticoagulant when necessary;
    • identify and define several categories of laboratory tests based on function and list the major tests included under each category;
    • apply quality control methods in all areas including advance patient preparation, specimen collection, handling, transportation, and laboratory testing;
    • identify and incorporate laboratory safety guidelines in performance laboratory test procedures;
    • state the reference (normal) ranges for the more common laboratory tests;
    • demonstrate proper preparation and administration of oral medication and correct handling of equipment and dosage for parenteral administration of medication;
    • demonstrate competency in the performance of selected laboratory procedures and/or diagnostic tests in the following categories: hematology, clinical chemistry, serology, and urinalysis;
    • demonstrate proper procedures for recording and mounting a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram;
    • demonstrate proper procedure for performance of spirometry;
    • identify the medical assistant's role in assisting with various specialty examinations; and
    • apply proper medical terminology in all areas listed above.


    Prerequisites: BI 150/BI 151, BI 152 , MA 115, MA 125, MA 126.
    Corequisites: ML 218, ML 219, MA 217
    F/S (N)

  
  •  

    MA 217 - Pharmacology


    Credit Hours: 2

    This course is designed to help students understand their responsibility concerning drugs and to appreciate the necessary limitations imposed upon them.  It is a brief introduction to classes of drugs, with an emphasis on the constant advances in drug therapy and includes the history and scope of pharmacology, drug standards and drug legislation, drug sources, administration, action, and use of drugs and basic mathematical principles in calculating the dosages of drugs, and the importance of nutrition and diet in maintaining health.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • identify general principles of pharmacology, pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics;
    • identify drug names, sources, forms and actions (including correct abbreviations and terminology);
    • explain how drugs are used for diagnosis, treatment and prevention;
    • recognize FDA laws and schedules governing drugs and controlled substances;
    • understand proper drug administration (both parenteral and non-parenteral routes), storage and record keeping (including the six rights of medication administration);
    • recognize allergic responses, symptomology, reactions and appropriate intervention/treatment;
    • demonstrate proper use of drug reference books including the PDR;
    • calculate proper medication doses for adult, pediatric and geriatric populations;
    • analyze nutritional aspects of pharmacology including the function of dietary supplements and nutrients, including carbohydrates, fat, protein, minerals, electrolytes, vitamins, fiber and water;
    • explain the importance of nutrition and diet in maintaining health, the importance of vitamins and minerals, and electrolyte balance;
    • identify the special dietary needs for patient-specific populations for weight control, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, cancer, lactose sensitivity, gluten-free and food allergies while respecting patient concern regarding dietary changes; and
    • demonstrate awareness for patient education with regard to patient-specific dietary needs, drug action, contraindications, adverse reactions and implications for patient care across multiple body systems, including the potential for drug tolerance, substance abuse and/or chemical dependency.


    Prerequisites: MT 111, BI 147 or BI 150.
    F/S (N)

  
  •  

    MA 220 - Medical Documentation II


    Credit Hours: 2

    Students will learn computerized spreadsheet applications using Microsoft Excel for the medical office. Integrated applications using Microsoft Word, PowerPoint and Excel with linked and embedded objects will be practiced. A PowerPoint medical research project must be presented. Medical dictation editing techniques are used to revise medical consultation letters and medical reports with emphasis on transcription style, formatting, spelling, punctuation, medical terminology and abbreviations.

     

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • apply knowledge of Word to correctly proofread and edit medical dictation;
    • create and edit patient data on Excel worksheets;
    • perform calculations using formulas, functions and absolute cell addresses;
    • link and embed Excel worksheets into Word and PowerPoint documents;
    • conduct medical research focusing on a condition or disease in the medical field;
    • create, edit and enhance a PowerPoint slide presentation (using SmartArt, WordArt, animations and transitions) based on a condition or disease; 
    • present a PowerPoint project orally to peers; and
    • use Excel to create and maintain an inventory of medical office supplies.


    Prerequisites: MA 115, MA 119
    F/S (N)

  
  •  

    MA 221 - MA Seminar


    Credit Hours: 1

    Students attend and participate in discussions and evaluations of their medical office practicum.  When identified, problems in the medical field as they relate to students are assessed and analyzed and solutions are formulated. Student participation is paramount to this course and the problem-solving process.  Students in this course are also introduced to resume preparation, job opportunities available to graduates and interviewing techniques, continuing education options and the CMA profession.  Preparation for the American Association of Medical Assistants certification examination is facilitated through an introduction of an examination review book.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: 

    • practice the skills necessary to work as a proficient medical assistant and team player;
    • role-play verbal and non-verbal communication styles;
    • role-play positive and negative interactions in the medical office with regard to legal, ethical and personal boundaries;
    • identify the various relationships between the medical assistant and other members of the healthcare team;
    • discuss current medical issues and their relationship to the practicing medical assistant;
    • identify the various kinds of job opportunities available to medical assisting graduates and the process of completing a job application form and resume;
    • demonstrate sensitivity to cultural diversity and the special needs community; and
    • identify the importance of continued education and involvement in professional organizations applicable to medical assisting career success and advancement.


    Prerequisites: All courses listed for the first three semesters, or equivalent with permission of instructor, or permission of MA program director.
    Corequisites: MA 220, EG 009, and PS 100.
    Concurrent Registration: MA 223 and MA 229.
    F/S (N)

  
  •  

    MA 223 - MA Practicum


    Credit Hours: 2

    This course offers students supervised involvement of a practicum in various health care facilities.  Through instructor facilitation, the student is introduced to the health care facilities' practical setting.  Students complete the 160 hour practicum program applying the administrative and clinical skills that have been learned during the first three semesters of the program.  Students do not receive pay for their practicum services. 

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this externship course, the student will be able to:

    • apply skills learned in class to situations encountered in the medical office;
    • assist office staff as requested;
    • interact courteously and calmly with patients;
    • perform administrative skills appropriate to the medical assistant; and
    • perform clinical skills appropriate to the medical assistant


    Prerequisites: Successful completion of all BI, MA, and MR courses listed for the first three semesters, or equivalent with permission of the instructor, or permission of MA program director.
    Corequisites: MA220, EG009, and PS100.
    Concurrent Registration: MA221, MA229
    F/S (N)

  
  •  

    MA 224 - Medical Office Practice Practicum


    Credit Hours: 1.0

    This course offers student involvement in the daily activities and routine of a busy office located in a physician's office, a group situation, a health clinic or a health maintenance organization.  Through instructor facilitation, the student is introduced to the office practical setting that is selected for its appropriateness to the student's certificate program.  This course provides student contact with both paraprofessionals and patients.  The student elects to complete an 80 hour supervised practicum experience to apply the administrative skills that have been learned in course work.  The student will not be paid for the practicum experience.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this practicum course, the student will be able to:

    • apply skills learned in class to situations encountered in the medical office;
    • assist office staff as requested;
    • interact courteously and calmly with patients; and
    • perform administrative skills appropriate to the medical assistant certificate level.


    Prerequisites: All courses listed for the first two semesters of the certificate program, or equivalent with permission of the MA program coordinator.
    Concurrent Registration: MA 229
    F/S (N)

  
  •  

    MA 229 - Professionalism in the Medical Office


    Credit Hours: 3

    This is a final semester class taken concurrently with the practicum and seminar courses. Students will develop professional soft skills to be applied while interacting with patients, office personnel and supervisors within a medical setting. Principles of professionalism and interpersonal communication theory are presented from various viewpoints. Students will practice using therapeutic communication strategies with diverse patient populations. Medical office soft skills will be refined using simulation software. A career portfolio will be created and students will learn how to use a portfolio during an interview and as a professional development/advancement tool. Certified Medical Assisting (CMA) exam review focusing on administrative knowledge will be practiced.

     

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to:

    • demonstrate knowledge of CMA exam question format and content (administrative component);
    • refine soft skills applied in a medical office setting;
    • develop therapeutic communication skills when interacting with patients;
    • understand the significance of professionalism in the medical office;
    • create updated employment documents such as resumes, professional references and cover letters;
    • develop a professional portfolio to be used for job searching and career advancement; and
    • develop constructive criticism skills through roleplay activities.

     

    Prerequisites: All courses listed for the first three semesters, or equivalent with permission of instructor or permission of MA program director.
    Concurrent Registration: MA 221 and MA 223.
    F/S (N)


Mental Health Assistant-Alcohol Counseling

  
  •  

    AC 210 - Alcoholism as a Public Health Problem


    Credit Hours: 3

    Introduces an understanding of the scope of the alcoholic problem from a local to worldwide geographic area. It incorporates a study of techniques and strategies utilized on a historical basis throughout the United States. Particular attention will be paid to the sociopsychological attitudes Americans have to drug abuse with particular attention to alcoholic themes in our history and the delivery systems.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will:

    • be able to identify how alcohol use/abuse impacts on society and why it is considered one of the major public behavioral health problems in America;
    • be able to identify the basic definitions and terms of alcoholism and explain the pathways from experimentation to addictive alcohol use;
    • be able to illustrate the irrationalized life style of being alcohol dependent and ways to impact upon the defense structure of the addicted individual so as to create healthy abstinence based alternatives;
    • be able to categorize medical and psychological diseases related to alcohol dependency according to the International Classification of Diseases diagnostic system; and
    • be to articulate the roles and responsibilities of being an addictions counselor, including self-help therapy approaches.


    F/S (C)

  
  •  

    AC 211 - Alcoholism as an Individual and Family Problem


    Credit Hours: 3

    Study of the development, familial, and psychological etiologies of alcoholism. Also included is the study of the effects of alcoholism's presence in families throughout successive generations, and cultural aspects of alcoholism. Case studies will be utilized. Intervention strategies will be presented.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will:

    • demonstrate an understanding of alcohol dependency and its physical and psychological health implications for the individual and the family;
    • demonstrate an understanding of the impact of alcohol dependency on the family regarding the roles that emerge and co-dependency; and
    • demonstrate an understanding of the various treatment strategies and support networks for the alcohol abuser and the family.


    F/S (C)

  
  •  

    AC 213 - Counseling Theories and Alcoholism


    Credit Hours: 3

    Study of the various counseling theories, approaches and techniques to counsel individuals and families. Measure of treatment effectiveness and unique approaches to working with different client populations. Students will begin to formulate their own personal counseling style while becoming aware of transference issues.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will:

    • be to articulate the various counseling theories that are used in addiction treatment;
    • be able to demonstrate the value of theoretical constructs to working with addicted individuals, families and significant others;
    • be able to demonstrate the ways in which the counselor's personal values and belief systems influence the counseling process; and
    • be able to demonstrate their role in becoming an addictions counselor by looking at their own strengths and challenges they may face.


    F/S (C)

  
  •  

    AC 214 - Alcoholism Counseling I


    Credit Hours: 3

    Study of the techniques and strategies for use in assessment and treatment of alcoholics, their families and significant others, with the goal of functional improvement in all life areas affected by alcohol-related dysfunctional behaviors. Basic counseling skills will be taught including attending, responding, personalizing and initiating. Ethical principles will be discussed in the context of providing alcohol and substance abuse counseling and treatment services.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will:

    • exhibit proficiency in attending, responding, personalizing and initiating skills;
    • gain increased self-awareness of their counseling approach and how it impacts the client;
    • demonstrate competency in the basic structure of interviewing and counseling; and
    • demonstrate a better understanding of ethical considerations and dilemmas as they apply to addictions counseling.


    F/S (C)

  
  •  

    AC 215 - Alcoholism Counseling II


    Credit Hours: 3

    Specific emphasis will be on developing skills in diagnosis of psycho-active substance disorders and comprehensive assessment and treatment planning. Techniques in evaluating mental status, providing individual and group therapy and teaching self-management skills to enhance recovery will be stressed. Additional information on mental health and personality disorders, neurocognitive impairments, and cognitive distortions as relates to the addicted client. This course will draw on theories learned in AC 213 and will build upon the skills learned in AC 214.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will:

    • be able to write a Diagnostic Clinical Work up according to the DSM 5;
    • be able to write a comprehensive psychosocial evaluation according to the NYS OASAS Standards;
    • be able to write a comprehensive assessment & treatment plan using the standard Addictions Treatment Planner, while adhering to managed care documentation requirements;
    • be able to demonstrate skill in psychological assessment, mental status and conduct lethality assessments; and
    • be able to assess for and address mood disorders, personality disorders and relational issues through case analysis assignments.


    Prerequisites: AC 213, AC 214 or permission of the instructor.
    F/S (C)

  
  •  

    AC 217 - Alcoholism Fieldwork I


    Credit Hours: 3

    Supervised practice in counseling in alcoholism treatment facilities. Course requires a minimum of 150 hours of clinical activities plus a supervision seminar during class time.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will:

    • demonstrate the increased ability to interact effectively with alcohol dependent clients, family members, or children of persons with alcohol dependency;
    • demonstrate improvement of their diagnostic assessment and treatment planning skills related to clinical activities with alcohol dependent individuals, families and significant others;
    • demonstrate improved knowledge and use of the American Society of Addiction Medicine client placement criteria as it relates to continuum of treatment, variable length of stay and treatment decision making;
    • demonstrate an increased knowledge of the alcohol dependency recovery process through clinical application of their knowledge, skills and community resources; and
    • demonstrate knowledge and application of counseling theories and techniques to addictions counseling.


    Prerequisites: AC 214 or SA 110 and AC 215 or permission of the instructor.
    F/S (C)

  
  •  

    AC 218 - Alcoholism Fieldwork II


    Credit Hours: 3

    Second required semester of supervised practice in alcoholism counseling. Course requires a minimum of 150 hours of clinical activities plus a supervision seminar during class time.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will:

    • demonstrate an increased knowledge of their learning of intake, individual and group counseling skills;
    • demonstrate an increased awareness of how the recovery process is impacted by other psychoactive substance dependencies, psychiatric disorders and developmental conflicts including children of alcoholics' residual issues and object relationship impairment;
    • demonstrate an increased self-understanding of their own issues as they relate to becoming a substance abuse counselor through agency supervision, privileging and clinical internship seminar; and
    • demonstrate an understanding schema therapy and its application to addictions clients.


    Prerequisites: AC 217 or SA 116
    F/S (C)


Mental Health Assistant-Substance Abuse

  
  •  

    SA 100 - Chemical Dependency Treatment Systems


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course is designed to acquaint the student with treatment modality-specific approaches and techniques utilized in the treatment of substance abuse with attention to the measurement of treatment effectiveness.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will:

    • be able to recognize the functions and approaches of the individual entities of chemical dependency treatment;
    • be able to identify where each modality fits into a comprehensive treatment program for substance abusers;
    • be familiar with the process of determining what substance abusers' treatment needs are, and how and where to access the treatment system; and
    • demonstrate comprehension of the roles and responsibilities of the chemical dependency counselor in implementation of services in the appropriate levels of care.


    F/S (C)

  
  •  

    SA 102 - Behavioral Patterns of Chemical Dependence


    Credit Hours: 3

    Study of the phenomenon of substance abuse with particular attention to the physiological, psychological and sociological factors that impact upon the disease. Emphasis is on understanding chemically dependent behavior.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • comprehend the latest research on addictions causation and treatment;
    • demonstrate a broader understanding of addiction personality characteristics and clinical disorders;
    • be able to outline their theory of addiction and approaches to treatment;
    • be able to describe the behavioral characteristics of addictive clients as they progress through the recovery process; and
    • be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical dependency behaviors and how they affect the family system.


    F/S (C)

  
  •  

    SA 104 - Pharmacology I


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course will study the drugs of abuse. The content will include the criteria by which drugs are scheduled, classification of controlled substances and the uses and effects of drugs.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will:

    • gain and demonstrate an understanding of the major systems of the human anatomy and how they function systemically;
    • gain and demonstrate an understanding of the various structures of the brain and their function;
    • gain and demonstrate an understanding of the scheduling of controlled substances; and
    • gain and demonstrate an understanding of the primary neurotransmitters and their function.


    F/S (C)

  
  •  

    SA 106 - Pharmacology II


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course will concentrate on narcotics, depressants, stimulants, hallucinogens and cannabis and understanding these drugs' effects on neurotransmitters. The neuropharmacology of controlled substances as well as drug classifications will be presented.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate an understanding of the pharmacological properties of alcohol, its effects on the central nervous system, and current pharmacological treatments for alcoholism;
    • gain and demonstrate an understanding of the various classifications of medication in the treatment of psychiatric disorders, including mood disorders and schizophrenia;
    • gain and demonstrate an understanding of the classification of medications, including controlled substances; and
    • gain and demonstrate an understanding of the pharmacological basis of addiction and current trends in its treatment.


    Prerequisites: SA 104 or permission of the instructor.
    F/S (C)

  
  •  

    SA 110 - Counseling Approaches with the Chemical Abuser


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course will teach counseling techniques and intervention methods useful in treatment of the chemical abuser. Intake and assessment techniques will be included. Students are taught basic human relations counseling skills including attending, responding, personalizing and initiating.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will:

    • exhibit proficiency in attending, responding, personalizing and initiating skills;
    • gain increased self-awareness of their counseling approach and how it impacts the client; and
    • demonstrate competency in the basic structure of interviewing and counseling.


    F/S (C)

  
  •  

    SA 112 - Dysfunction Family Systems


    Credit Hours: 3

    The role of the family in the recovery of the chemical abuser and study of the psychological stressors, attitudes and behaviors of the family system will be examined.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will:

    • demonstrate an understanding of chemical dependency and its physical and psychological health implications for the individual and the family;
    • demonstrate an understanding of the impact of chemical dependency on the family regarding the roles that emerge and co-dependency; and
    • demonstrate an understanding of the various treatment strategies and support networks for the chemical abuser and the family.


    F/S (C)

  
  •  

    SA 114 - Treatment Population


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course examines several specific treatment populations, e.g., adolescents, the elderly, women, minorities, and persons with other concurrent mental health issues, along with techniques for addressing the needs of these particular groups. This course provides an overview of the various Special Topics courses.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will:

    • be able to demonstrate an understanding of the concept of multiculturalism and how this concept is interrelated with chemical dependency treatment and recovery;
    • demonstrate knowledge of the range of backgrounds and experiences of various chemically dependent minority treatment populations;
    • demonstrate a basic understanding of effective treatment approaches and techniques to assist persons with chemical dependency in different cultural and minority groups; and
    • demonstrate increased insight into their own prejudices, positive or negative, and how and when these prejudices were incorporated into their frames of reference regarding different minority groups.


    F/S (C)

  
  •  

    SA 116 - Clinical Internship I


    Credit Hours: 3

    This first semester of clinical internship provides the student with a minimum of 150 hours of practical on-site agency experience and observation of professional treatment of the substance abuser. Under the supervision of certified addiction counselors or other qualified health professionals, the student will participate in all functions and treatment activities of the agency. In addition, a supervision seminar is conducted weekly during scheduled class time. Admission into internship will not only be based on academic readiness but professional and experiential considerations by the instructor. A student that has completed all the academic requirements may not be permitted to take the internship based on the instructor approval. The instructor will determine the student's level of readiness, appropriateness, performance expectations, and overall suitability for the entry into the course.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will:

    • demonstrate the increased ability to interact effectively with chemically dependent clients, family members, or children of persons with chemical dependency;
    • demonstrate improvement of their diagnostic assessment and treatment planning skills related to clinical activities with chemically dependent individuals, families and significant others;
    • demonstrate improved knowledge and use of the American Society of Addiction Medicine client placement criteria as it relates to continuum of treatment, variable length of stay and treatment decision making;
    • demonstrate an increased knowledge of the chemical dependency recovery process through clinical application of their knowledge, skills and community resources; and
    • demonstrate knowledge and application of counseling theories and techniques to addictions counseling.


    Prerequisites: AC 214 or SA 110 and AC 215
    F/S (C)

  
  •  

    SA 117 - Clinical Internship II


    Credit Hours: 3

    The second semester of clinical internship requires an additional 150 hours minimum of practical clinical experience. This semester generally requires the student to perform more hands-on, actual treatment, including individual case management and group therapy responsibilities. Supervised seminars are conducted weekly during scheduled class time. Admission into internship will not only be based on academic readiness but professional and experiential considerations by the instructor. A student that has completed all the academic requirements may not be permitted to take the internship based on the instructor approval. The instructor will determine the student's level of readiness, appropriateness, performance expectations, and overall suitability for the entry into the course.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will:

    • demonstrate an increased knowledge of their learning of intake, individual and group counseling skills;
    • demonstrate an increased awareness of how the recovery process is impacted by other psychoactive substance dependencies, psychiatric disorders and developmental conflicts including children of alcoholics' residual issues and object relationship impairment;
    • demonstrate an increased self-understanding of their own issues as they relate to becoming a substance abuse counselor through agency supervision, privileging and clinical internship seminar; and
    • demonstrate an understanding schema therapy and its application to addictions clients.


    Prerequisites: SA 116 or AC 217
    F/S (C)

  
  •  

    SA 127 - Topics in Addiction - Ethics and Confidentiality


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course introduces an understanding of the nature of ethics in the human services field and especially in the area of chemical dependency counseling. It incorporates the formation of and "ethical sense" including a commitment to education, being an active learner, learning from role models, and getting involved in related coursework. In addition, an exploration and training in application of the applicable Codes of Ethics for Substance Abuse Counselors.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate knowledge of ethical standards and practice for substance abuse professionals;
    • apply and establish appropriate boundaries and develop a framework for evaluating and managing multiple relationships in providing chemical dependency treatment; and
    • identify various counselor roles and recognize the potential for the development of ethics dilemmas.


    F/S (C)

  
  •  

    SA 128 - Group Counseling Approaches in Substance Abuse


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course will provide a comprehensive overview of group counseling theory, methods, and techniques, and will focus particularly on the chemically addicted population. Classes will include didactic presentation of information, skills acquisition, and group participation, and will serve as a place to begin practicing new skills and experiencing how group processes work.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • apply group counseling strategies from accepted and culturally appropriate models when working with clients with substance abuse disorders;
    • facilitate curative factors necessary for successful therapy groups with addicted clients and practice their application;
    • identify differences between manifest and latent content and practice uncovering latent themes in addiction groups; and
    • demonstrate skills in documenting the client's progress and participation in group therapy sessions.


    Prerequisites: AC 214 or SA 110
    F/S (C)


Music

  
  •  

    MU 100 - Exploring World Music


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course deals with the field of ethnomusicology – the study of music as culture. It introduces students to a study of music from an international and crosscultural perspective, exploring commonalities and differences in how music is defined, valued and utilized in many cultures around the world. The musical elements of harmony, rhythm, melody, texture, timbre and form are examined in relation to the culture and country from which they evolved. The cultures and music of Western Europe, the United States, Ireland, India, South America, Africa and Japan are explored and compared.

    Fulfills SUNY General Education -- Humanities.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the course, students should be able to:

    • define in writing the field of ethnomusicology;
    • define in writing the six major concepts in music and related musical terms;
    • discuss orally and in writing the similarities and differences in the evolution and usage of these six musical concepts in creating and performing music in various countries and cultures around the world;
    • discuss how music is both a reflection of, and an influence on societies;
    • discuss in writing how music learning is approached differently in various countries and cultures;
    • discuss in writing the different roles of composers and performers in various countries and cultures;
    • discuss how technology has affected music performance, composition, learning, and listening;
    • research two seemingly diverse cultures and write a paper comparing the evolution, purpose, and style of music in these two cultures;
    • give a brief report of their research findings to the class; and
    • listen to musical examples and identify the culture and country that the music represents.


    F/S (C, N, S)

  
  •  

    MU 115 - Pep Band


    Credit Hours: 1.5

    Pep Band is a musical performing group. The band rehearses once per week from September to early November during football season. Students are required to perform at all home football games. Rehearsals are held at each of the three campuses separately, but the entire group meets for rehearsal and game performances at South Campus on Saturdays of each home football game. Students must have previous experience playing a musical instrument. Pep Band may be taken up to two times for credit. Each section (MU 115 and MU 116) receives 1.5 credits.

    Course Outcomes
    The students will be able to:

    • perform music accurately in regard to rhythm, notes, dynamics and other elements of good musicianship;
    • demonstrate improvement in performance individually & as an ensemble;
    • perform with proper musical and performance etiquette;
    • perform with good posture;
    • demonstrate proper care and maintenance of their instrument; and
    • perform at all home football games.


    F (C, N, S)

  
  •  

    MU 116 - Pep Band II


    Credit Hours: 1.5

    Pep Band is a musical performing group. The band rehearses once per week from September to early November during football season. Students are required to perform at all home football games. Rehearsals are held at each of the three campuses separately, but the entire group meets for rehearsal and game performances at South Campus on Saturdays of each home football game. Students must have previous experience playing a musical instrument. Pep Band may be taken up to two times for credit. Each section (MU 115 and MU 116) receives 1.5 credits.

    Course Outcomes
    The students will be able to:

    • perform music accurately in regard to  rhythm, notes, dynamics and other elements of good musicianship;
    • demonstrate improvement in performance individually & as an ensemble;
    • perform with proper musical and  performance etiquette;
    • perform with good posture;
    • demonstrate proper care and maintenance of their instrument; and
    • perform at all home football games.


    F (C, N, S)

  
  •  

    MU 200 - The Fundamentals of Music


    Credit Hours: 3

    Fundamentals of Music is planned for those students seeking to acquire basic skills in reading and writing using music notational symbols. This course is designed for students with little or no musical background. Learning the basics of the piano, keyboard, and ear training are also included.

    Fulfills SUNY General Education -- The Arts.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • understand basic major and minor scale formation;
    • develop the capability of discerning various melodic and harmonic sounds, along with rhythmic units within western tonalization;
    • understand basic music theory and its function within a composition;
    • be familiar with musical terminology and how to apply it to musical form; and
    • give an overall concept of music theory and its application to the keyboard and other instruments.


    Cycles (C, N, S)

  
  •  

    MU 201 - Instrumentation and Arranging


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course will provide the musically-oriented student with a basic understanding of music composition and arranging. Students will become familiar with the timbre, range, and transposition of common musical instruments. Application of elementary harmony and arranging techniques will be stressed. Students will learn to write and arrange music using the FINALE software music program.

    Fulfills SUNY General Education -- The Arts.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

    • understand musical forms;
    • be able to use major & minor scales in creating melody;
    • be able to harmonize melody with chords;
    • understand & use various chord voicings;
    • identify the range of musical instruments;
    • transpose musical instruments correctly; and
    • arrange a specific song for specified instrumentation.


    Prerequisites: MU 200 or permission of the instructor.
    Cycles (N, S)

  
  •  

    MU 202 - Jazz Ensemble I


    Credit Hours: 2

    The study, rehearsal, and performance of standard jazz ensemble literature. Instruction in jazz improvisation is an integral part of rehearsals. Students must have previous experience playing a musical instrument. The ensemble performs at various college functions. The ensemble is open to all campuses, but rehearses in the G-Building auditorium at the North campus. Course numbers may be used consecutively (over a four-semester span). A limited number of college-owned musical instruments are available for student use.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the course, students  should be able to:

    • demonstrate accurate musical performance (melodically, rhythmically, and stylistically) on assigned parts;
    • demonstrate individual improvement on their instruments (music reading and tone production);
    • improvise over a 12-bar Blues and other forms as rehearsed;
    • show the ability to work well with others in creating a unified musical performance; and
    • participate in all public performances as scheduled by the director.


    Cycles (N, S)

  
  •  

    MU 203 - Jazz Ensemble II


    Credit Hours: 2

    The study, rehearsal, and performance of standard jazz ensemble literature. Instruction in jazz improvisation is an integral part of rehearsals. Students must have previous experience playing a musical instrument.  The ensemble performs at various college functions. The ensemble is open to all campuses, but rehearses in the G-Building auditorium at the North campus. Course numbers may be used consecutively (over a four-semester span). A limited number of college-owned musical instruments are available for student use.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the course, students  should be able to:

    • demonstrate accurate musical performance (melodically, rhythmically, and stylistically) on assigned parts;
    • demonstrate individual improvement on their instruments (music reading and tone production);
    • improvise over a 12-bar Blues and other forms as rehearsed;
    • show the ability to work well with others in creating a unified musical performance; and
    • participate in all public performances as scheduled by the director.


    Cycles (N, S)

  
  •  

    MU 204 - Jazz Ensemble III


    Credit Hours: 2

    The study, rehearsal, and performance of standard jazz ensemble literature. Instruction in jazz improvisation is an integral part of rehearsals. Students must have previous experience playing a musical instrument. The ensemble performs at various college functions. The ensemble is open to all campuses, but rehearses in the G-Building auditorium at the North campus. Course numbers may be used consecutively (over a four-semester span). A limited number of college-owned musical instruments are available for student use.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the course, students  should be able to:

    • demonstrate accurate musical performance (melodically, rhythmically, and stylistically) on assigned parts;
    • demonstrate individual improvement on their instruments (music reading and tone production);
    • improvise over a 12-bar Blues and other forms as rehearsed;
    • show the ability to work well with others in creating a unified musical performance; and
    • participate in all public performances as scheduled by the director.


    Cycles (N, S)

  
  •  

    MU 205 - Jazz Ensemble IV


    Credit Hours: 2

    The study, rehearsal, and performance of standard jazz ensemble literature. Instruction in jazz improvisation is an integral part of rehearsals. Students must have previous experience playing a musical instrument. The ensemble performs at various college functions. The ensemble is open to all campuses, but rehearses in the G-Building auditorium at the North campus. Course numbers may be used consecutively (over a four-semester span). A limited number of college-owned musical instruments are available for student use.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the course, students  should be able to:

    • demonstrate accurate musical performance (melodically, rhythmically, and stylistically) on assigned parts;
    • demonstrate individual improvement on their instruments (music reading and tone production);
    • improvise over a 12-bar Blues and other forms as rehearsed;
    • show the ability to work well with others in creating a unified musical performance; and
    • participate in all public performances as scheduled by the director.


    Cycles (N, S)

  
  •  

    MU 206 - Chorus I


    Credit Hours: 2

    A mixed chorus will study choral literature of various styles and periods and will schedule regular weekly rehearsals at any or all campuses of the college. An all-curriculum elective, acceptance into the class is based on the director's permission.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate capability in performance of harmonic and melodic setting;
    • strengthen and widen individual voice range;
    • redefine articulation and proper breathing in singing;
    • recognize the concept of musical forms; and
    • understand phrasing, motives, and periods within a musical composition.


    Cycles (C, N, S)

  
  •  

    MU 207 - Chorus II


    Credit Hours: 2

    A mixed chorus will study choral literature of various styles and periods and will schedule regular weekly rehearsals at any or all campuses of the college. An all-curriculum elective, acceptance into the class is based on the director's permission.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate capability in performance of harmonic and melodic setting;
    • strengthen and widen individual voice range;
    • redefine articulation and proper breathing in singing;
    • recognize the concept of musical forms; and
    • understand phrasing, motives, and periods within a musical composition.


    Cycles (C, N, S)

  
  •  

    MU 208 - Chorus III


    Credit Hours: 2

    A mixed chorus will study choral literature of various styles and periods and will schedule regular weekly rehearsals at any or all campuses of the college. An all-curriculum elective, acceptance into the class is based on the director's permission.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate capability in performance of harmonic and melodic setting;
    • strengthen and widen individual voice range;
    • redefine articulation and proper breathing in singing;
    • recognize the concept of musical forms; and
    • understand phrasing, motives, and periods within a musical composition.


    Cycles (C, N, S)

  
  •  

    MU 209 - Chorus IV


    Credit Hours: 2

    A mixed chorus will study choral literature of various styles and periods and will schedule regular weekly rehearsals at any or all campuses of the college. An all-curriculum elective, acceptance into the class is based on the director's permission.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate capability in performance of harmonic and melodic setting;
    • strengthen and widen individual voice range;
    • redefine articulation and proper breathing in singing;
    • recognize the concept of musical forms; and
    • understand phrasing, motives, and periods within a musical composition.


    Cycles (C, N, S)

  
  •  

    MU 210 - The Enjoyment of Music


    Credit Hours: 3

    An overview of the sources, media and functions of music during the historical periods traditionally associated with music history. The roles of the composer, arranger, conductor, artist performer, critic and listener are explored and defined. Emphasis is on the development of listening awareness within the broad outline of music history.

    Fulfills SUNY General Education -- The Arts.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • understand the different stylistic periods of music history;
    • identify and analyze the difference in the variables of musical form, elements and texture within western tonalization;
    • understand and interpret the musical techniques utilized by composers; and
    • be acquainted with the principal musical artist of each period and to appreciate the aesthetic quality of their work.

     

    Cycles (C, N, S)

  
  •  

    MU 213 - Twentieth Century Music


    Credit Hours: 3

    Music from the impressionist movement through German expressionism and American eclecticism to electronic and aleatoric music.

    Fulfills SUNY General Education -- The Arts.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    • be familiar with the concepts utilized in 20th Century music;
    • identify the differences in musical techniques utilized during the Common Practice Period and the Modern Period of music history;
    • demonstrate an understanding of atonal and absolute music; and
    • apply concepts and principles of earlier music to today's music.


    Prerequisites: MU 210 or permission of the instructor.
    Cycles (C, N, S)

  
  •  

    MU 214 - Introduction to Folk Guitar


    Credit Hours: 3

    An introductory course for beginning guitarists. The emphasis will be on accompaniment patterns, strums and arpeggios in 2/4, 3/4, 4/4 and 6/8 time signatures and the basic guitar keys in the open positions. Each student must provide his/her own guitar.

    Fulfills SUNY General Education -- The Arts.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the course, the student should  be able to:

    • tune the guitar accurately;
    • demonstrate proper hand position;
    • perform scales as designated;
    • perform simple melodies;
    • perform simple chordal accompaniment;
    • perform various guitar ensemble literature; and
    • perform simple folk tunes.


    Cycles (S)

  
  •  

    MU 215 - Survey of Jazz


    Credit Hours: 3

    A survey of the development of jazz in America circa 1900 to the present. In addition to studying major jazz musicians, emphasis is placed on understanding the musical characteristics of various jazz styles through increased listening skills.

    Fulfills the following SUNY General Education categories:

    • The Arts
    • Humanities


    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to:

    • identify aurally, and in writing, the six (6) major style periods of jazz;
    • identify in writing the four (4) major characteristics in jazz styles;
    • understand the creative process of improvisation in jazz performance;
    • identify aurally the four (4) major rhythmic beats ("feels") in jazz music;
    • identify the black African and white European musical elements that combined to develop jazz;
    • discuss in writing the evolution of the blues and its influence on jazz;
    • list the musical characteristics of each jazz style;
    • identify in writing the major jazz artists from each style period and their contributions to jazz; and
    • discuss and give reasons for their preferences for a particular jazz style.


    Cycles (C, N, S)

  
  •  

    MU 217 - Survey of Popular Music in America


    Credit Hours: 3

    A survey of popular music forms, styles and functions within the social and cultural patterns of the various eras in American history. Special emphasis is centered on theatrical and commercial music. Song collections, scores, films, filmstrips, critiques and other printed materials, disc and cassette recordings will be utilized to sample the 225 years of the popular music of Americans.

    Fulfills the following SUNY General Education categories:

    • The Arts
    • Humanities


    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to:

    • discuss in writing the evolution of the blues and its development into rock and roll;
    • discuss the African-American roots in the development of popular music;
    • discuss the white American roots in the development of popular music;
    • demonstrate an understanding of American popular music styles that preceded rock and roll (1880 - 1950);
    • list the musical characteristics of rhythm and blues, and rock and roll;
    • explain in writing the sociological conditions in each decade from 1930 to the present, and how these conditions influenced the evolution of musical styles in these decades;
    • demonstrate a knowledge of the importance of the major musical artists of each popular musical style studied in these decades;
    • write critical essays on contemporary popular music articles;
    • discuss and explain their preferences for a particular popular musical style; and
    • research a topic of their choice related to American popular music, and present findings to the class.


    Cycles (C, N, S)

  
  •  

    MU 219 - Healing with Music


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course will examine music, its therapeutic uses and its transformational effect on the restoration of health and wellbeing. Emphasis will be on listening to different types of music which influence healing, learning and the practice of techniques which achieve a mind/body/spirit harmony. Students will study the evolution of music and humanity from ancient indigenous cultures to future worlds. There will be a concentration on music's healing properties for personal use and in therapeutic environments.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    • listen to music as a healing and therapeutic power;
    • develop an understanding of music as a primary evolutionary force in the on-going development of humanity and society;
    • become aware of and appreciate composers' and musicians' contributions to the changing and shaping of world society;
    • explore and technical advances in music from ancient worlds, present and for the future, and consider the impact it has, has had, and will have on humanity;
    • learn how the use of your own voice and personal drumming can aid in the healing and toning of your body; and
    • demonstrate an ability to research necessary knowledge for lifelong pursuits.


    F/S (S)

  
  •  

    MU 240 - Beginning Piano I


    Credit Hours: 2

    A beginning piano class with emphasis on sight reading (note recognition and rhythm), scales, and keyboard exercises.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • accurately execute sight reading as pertains to the piano;
    • acquire a precise and clean understanding of specific musical forms and its relationship to western tonality; and
    • effectively demonstrate a comprehensive command of the piano.


    F/S (C)

  
  •  

    MU 299 - Topics in Music


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course will examine various topics that shape current music or music history. Examples of topics might include musical genres and style, historical periods in music, the role of music in culture and society, technology and music, the influence of current events and music, and important musicians.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate through writing and discussion an understanding of music genres and styles (hard rock, blue grass, punk, etc.);
    • demonstrate through writing and discussion an awareness of how genres and styles evolve into new forms of musical expression;
    • demonstrate through writing and discussion an understanding of the causal relationship between society, culture, and music;
    • understand and interpret the various creative techniques utilized by composers and songwriters; and
    • demonstrate through writing and discussion an understanding of the meaning and intent behind musical works and song lyrics



Nano Science

  
  •  

    NS 100 - Introduction to Nanotechnology


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course will introduce students to the concept of size and scale in relation to nanoscience. It will introduce students to the common terminology, and cover the basic mathematics required for working in the nanoscale, and the  environmental, health and safety concerns of nanotechnology. The classification of materials by their physical, chemical, electrical, optical, and mechanical properties will be discussed, as well as the lab instruments used to characterize them such as optical, electron beam and scanning probe microscopes, spectrophotometers, and profilometers. Basic nanotechnology processes and fabrication will be covered, in addition to current nanotechnology applications in such diverse fields as electronics, medicine, textiles, energy, biotechnology, and consumer products.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    • recognize that the rules of nanoscience and properties of nanomaterials are fundamentally different than those we experience in everyday life;
    • demonstrate an informed perspective on nanotechnology that balances legitimate health safety concerns with possible benefits;
    • describe the concepts of top down and bottom up fabrication for nanotechnology applications;
    • demonstrate an understanding of the various material properties that can be manipulated on the nanoscale;
    • describe the utilization and application of various characterization instruments; and
    • critically evaluate new and emerging applications of nanoscale science and technology in the fields of engineering, science, medicine, and consumer products.


    Prerequisites: Math Placement of MT 112 or higher
    F/S (N)

  
  •  

    NS 201 - Materials, Safety and Equipment Overview for Nanotechnology


    Credit Hours: 3.0

    This course will prepare students for advanced Nanotechnology courses by providing them with the solid knowledge of Nanotechnology fundamentals in the following areas: concept of size and scale in relation to nanotechnology; environmental, health and safety concerns and protocols in nanotechnology; structure of matter on the Nano scale including concept of nanosurface and energy at the Nano scale; classification of materials by their physical, chemical, electrical, optical, and mechanical properties; basic vacuum systems; Nano characterization and fabrication equipment and processes.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate basic working knowledge of Nano materials and Nano processes safety such as chemical, biological, electrical, environmental, health and safety;
    • demonstrate an understanding of principles of vacuum based systems;
    • demonstrate an understanding of the structure of the matter on the Nano scale and its difference from the material properties of the bulk matter;
    • classify materials based on their chemical and physical properties;
    • demonstrate an understanding of the general Nano fabrication processing and contamination and damage control;
    • describe the utilization and application of various characterization instruments; and
    • identify and use appropriate technical literature for the research assignment.


    Prerequisites: CH 180, MT 126
    Corequisites: PH 272
    F/S (N)

  
  •  

    NS 202 - Basic Nanotechnology Processes


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course will introduce students to: top down, bottom up and hybrid nanofabrication; additive processes and sputtering; plasma, plasma setups and plasma deposition; subtractive processes and etching; RIE; wet etching; pattern transfer and lithography techniques; typical LPCVD systems for top down applications; 1D materials in bottom up applications; and physical vapor deposition.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    • describe main nanofabrication processes;
    • run basic additive and subtractive nanotechnology processes and equipment;
    • conduct pattern transfer and implement basic lithography techniques; and
    • effectively and safely work as a member of technical team on laboratory assignments.


    Prerequisites: NS 201
    Corequisites: NS 206
    F/S (N)

  
  •  

    NS 203 - Characterization of Nanotechnology Structures and Materials


    Credit Hours: 3.0

    This course will introduce students to the following topics: characterizing Nanotechnology materials with light or physical properties; photon-based spectroscopies; characterization based on electron beams; probe characterization techniques; and particle based spectroscopies.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate an understanding of light based characterization and spectroscopies;
    • demonstrate an understanding of electron based characterization and spectroscopies;
    • apply industry-standard photon-based, electron-based, probe microscopy, chemical  and mechanical characterization equipment to Nanotechnology materials; and
    • effectively and safely work as a member of technical team in laboratory setting.

                                                                                                                                                   

    Prerequisites: NS 201
    Corequisites: NS 202, NS 206
    F/S (N)

  
  •  

    NS 204 - Materials in Nanotechnology


    Credit Hours: 3.0

    This course will introduce students to the following topics: colloids and colloidal chemistry in Nanotechnology; chemical self-assembly; properties of Nanoparticles; Nanoparticle synthesis and applications; quantum dot physics, synthesis and applications; cellular overview, biocompatibility and common materials; PDMS background, properties and applications.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate an understanding of the basic chemical processes for creation of Nanoscale materials;
    • describe industry applications for the various chemical synthesis processes for Nanoscale materials;
    • apply industry-standard techniques for the synthesis and characterization of Nanotechnology materials; and
    • effectively and safely work as a member of technical team in laboratory setting.


    Prerequisites: NS 201
    Corequisites: NS 202, NS 203, NS 206
    F/S (N)

  
  •  

    NS 205 - Patterning for Nanotechnology


    Credit Hours: 3.0

    This course will introduce students to the following topics: basics of photolithography; advanced lithography technologies such as antireflective coating, alignment and exposure systems, contact aligner, scanning projection aligner, electron beam lithography; photoresists; nanoimprint lithography; UV molding; edge lithography; probe lithography; block copolymer patterning.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate an understanding of basic lithography techniques;
    • describe advanced lithography techniques employed in the industry;
    • successfully apply photolithography techniques for pattern transfer; and
    • effectively and safely work as a member of technical team in laboratory setting.


    Prerequisites: NS 201
    Corequisites: NS 202, NS 203, NS 206
    F/S (N)

  
  •  

    NS 206 - Vacuum Systems and Nanotechnology Applications


    Credit Hours: 3.0

    This course will introduce students to the: vacuum systems design, operation and troubleshooting; physical and chemical vapor deposition applications; plasmas and materials; plasma removal process; advanced etch systems; dielectric creation by growth and deposition; application of Nanotechnology to organic solar cells.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate detailed understanding of principles of vacuum based systems and their components;
    • operate, maintain and troubleshoot various vacuum systems;
    • demonstrate an understanding of and proficiency in the applications of plasma based processes to nanofabrication;
    • demonstrate an understanding of chemical vapor deposition processes and systems.
    • perform furnace deposition with dry or wet oxidation;
    • effectively work as a member of technical team on laboratory assignments; and
    • make an effective presentation of a research or design topic.


    Prerequisites: NS 201
    F/S (N)


Nursing

  
  •  

    NU 102 - Overview of Nursing


    Credit Hours: 2

    This is an introductory course on the development, issues and perspectives of nursing. The course will examine and promote those qualities which help a person become successful in the profession of nursing. The course is designed to define culture and illness, identify healthcare systems in today's society, and the function of the various healthcare providers as members of the healthcare team.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • define health and illness as it relates to nursing practice;
    • define the concept of nursing;
    • describe the role of the health care team;
    • identify the changes that are occurring in nursing;
    • relate the concepts of cultural diversity to the practice of nursing;
    • describe the various educational routes to licensure and various levels of nursing practice;
    • identify and discuss ethical and moral issues in nursing today;
    • identify the principles of communication;
    • identify library and multi-media as resource tools;
    • describe strategies to help nursing students to minimize and manage stress;
    • explore ways of demonstrating critical thinking; and
    • identify health/community resources available in the nursing program.


    F/S (C, N)

  
  •  

    NU 106 - Complementary & Alternative Therapies


    Credit Hours: 3

    This elective course presents an overview of some complementary and alternative healing therapies that are available today. People are searching out different therapies because they are not satisfied with the usual treatments, are seeking more natural methods or are choosing to take responsibility for their own healing. Each therapy will be described as to its uses, its contraindications, training and education required. Further, implications for nurses, other health care professionals and consumers will be discussed. CAM therapy practitioners will be invited in as guest speakers.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will:

    • identify the concepts of well being;
    • understand the differences in complementary and alternative therapies as compared to traditional medicine;
    • explain the Eastern and Western medicine therapies;
    • describe Alternative Medicine System;
    • identify the treatments included in five categories of therapies;
    • describe the CAM therapies used in the treatment of ailments;
    • identify consumers issues related to CAM therapies;
    • understand the responsibilities of health care providers related to CAM therapies; and
    • utilize library and multimedia resources.


    F/S (C, N, S)

  
  •  

    NU 116 - Health Promotion


    Credit Hours: 4

    The course is designed to assist the beginning nursing student to understand the foundation of healthcare practices based on the wellness continuum. The concept of wellness will be explored through categories of human functioning and stages of maturity.  Dimensions of health promotion will include physiological, psychosocial, and cultural aspects of human wellness, along with normal childbearing. Application of the nursing process will be presented.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • identify concepts of the wellness and health promotion;
    • explain the stages of maturity;
    • explain the cultural beliefs and lifestyle behaviors that influence wellness and health promotion;
    • identify the concept of caring;
    • identify the principles of communication;
    • identify the principles of critical thinking;
    • identify the principles of infection control;
    • identify the steps of the nursing process in health promotion;
    • identify library and multi-media as resource tools;
    • describe the development of the role of the nurse as a professional in the health care system;
    • identify principles of health education; and
    • identify health/community resources available for health promotion.


    Corequisites: BI 150, BI 151, EN 110, MT 111, NU 117, NU 128
    F/S (C, N)

  
  •  

    NU 117 - Lab for NU 116


    Credit Hours: 4

    College and clinical laboratory experiences are designed to assist the student to use the nursing process to care for the well individual. Community and healthcare settings will be utilized to provide the students opportunities to practice health promotion with clients at various stages of maturity.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    • utilize the concepts of wellness and health promotion in care for clients;
    • show awareness of the influence of stages of maturity on wellness and health promotion;
    • show an awareness of cultural beliefs and lifestyle behaviors that influence wellness and health promotion;
    • show awareness of caring behaviors in the clinical setting;
    • use basic communication skills with selected clients;
    • apply principles of critical thinking skills at the beginning level;
    • apply principles of infection control in client care;
    • apply the steps of the nursing process at a beginning level to clients for wellness and health promotion;
    • utilize library and multi-media resources;
    • identify the role of the professional nurse in wellness and health promotion;
    • utilize principles of health education in promoting wellness.
    • demonstrate skill in designated nursing procedures; and
    • recognize health/community resources available for health promotion.


    Corequisites: BI 150, BI 151, EN 110, MT 111, NU 116, NU 128
    F/S (C, N)

  
  •  

    NU 120 - Health Promotion: RN Transition for LPN/Medical Military Personnel


    Credit Hours: 2.5

    This course is designated to assist the LPN/medical military personnel entering the first semester of the Associate's Degree RN Program (in lieu of NU 116/117), to understand the foundation of healthcare practices based on the wellness-illness continuum and use of the nursing process. Concepts of wellness, categories of human functioning, stages of maturity and dimensions of health promotion, along with childbearing, will be explored in a condensed presentation. College laboratory experiences will focus on the community as well as a skills assessment, and are designed to assist the LPN/medical military personnel entering the first semester of the Associate's Degree RN Program. Included will be an application of the nursing process with a childbearing family, in the community. The transcripts of the medical military personnel will be individually evaluated by the department and assessed for appropriate departmental transfer credit.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • identify concepts of the wellness/illness continuum;
    • identify concepts of health promotion/prevention of illness;
    • identify categories of human functioning;
    • identify categories of health alterations;
    • explain the psychological and psychosocial changes throughout the stages of maturity;
    • explain the psychosocial concepts of stress, adaptation and coping;
    • identify principles of communication;
    • identify the concept of caring;
    • identify spiritual and cultural factors, which affect wellness in individuals;
    • describe health promotion associated with all categories of health alteration, including childbirth;
    • identify the principles of infection control;
    • describe the focuses and purposes of the nursing process and its steps;
    • identify the nursing activities involved in each step of the nursing process;
    • apply principles of critical thinking skills at the beginning level;
    • apply the steps of the nursing process at a beginning level to clients for wellness and health promotion;
    • utilize library and multi-media resources;
    • utilize principles of health education and promoting wellness;
    • demonstrate skill in designated nursing procedures;
    • recognize health/community resources available for health promotion; and
    • incorporate the RN role in managing, assigning and planning client care.


    Corequisites: BI 150, BI 151, EN 110, MT 111 or waiver.
    F/S (C, N)

  
  •  

    NU 125 - IV Insertion and Infusion Therapy


    Credit Hours: 1

    Increased high-technology skills are now required of nurses at most institutions. The purpose of this elective class is to provide nurses and nursing students an opportunity to improve their skills. This course is designed to provide information on insertion of peripheral IV's, as well as their care and maintenance. It will also focus on the management of various central venous access devices. Students will have the opportunity to practice simulated IV insertions in a lab setting. A certificate of completion will be provided for all successful participants.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • assess veins with improved accuracy/skill/technique and identify appropriate rational behind each step;
    • describe the purpose and indications for IV therapy;
    • describe pharmacological considerations in IV infusion therapy;
    • identify assessment, interventions and treatments for complications associated with venipuncture and infusion therapy;
    • identify among different types of venous access devices, their specialization and indications for use;
    • locate suitable veins for access;
    • demonstrate a simulated venipuncture and IV insertion; and
    • identify the legal ramifications of IV therapy.


    Prerequisites: Completion of NU 116, NU 117, NU 128 or a nursing fundamentals course, RN's, LPN's. Permission of the instructor.
    F/S (C, N)

  
  •  

    NU 126 - Health Maintenance


    Credit Hours: 4

    A study of the preservation of the optimal health status of the individual through health maintenance activities. Health maintenance will be examined through detection and assessment of early signs and symptoms of impending illness, including physiologic and psychosocial dimensions.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the course, the student will:
     

    • explain the concepts of health seeking behaviors and health maintenance;
    • identify the influence of the stages of maturity on health maintenance;
    • explain cultural beliefs and life style behaviors that influence health maintenance;
    • describe caring behaviors;
    • differentiate methods of effective communication;
    • explain the application of critical thinking for clients seeking to maintain health;
    • determine principles of infection control necessary for health maintenance;
    • identify the use of the nursing process in health maintenance;
    • employ the library and multi-media as resource tools;
    • describe the legal and ethical responsibilities of the professional nurse;
    • describe the principles of health teaching in health maintenance; and
    • identify health/community resources available for health maintenance.


    Prerequisites: NU 116, NU 117 or NU 120, NU 128
    Corequisites: BI 152, BI 153, NU 127, PS 100
    F/S (C, N)

  
  •  

    NU 127 - Lab for NU 126


    Credit Hours: 4

    College and clinical laboratory experience are designed to assist the student with the preservation of the health status of individuals at various stages of maturity as they adapt to continuous threats to optimum health. Application of these strategies will be performed in acute care, rehabilitative and community settings.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the course, the student will:

    • utilize the concepts of health seeking behaviors and health maintenance in caring for clients;
    • show an awareness of the influence of stages of maturity on health maintenance;
    • show an awareness of cultural beliefs and lifestyle behaviors that influence health maintenance;
    • practice caring behaviors in the clinical setting;
    • demonstrate the ability to utilize various methods of communication with selected clients;
    • demonstrate critical thinking in the clinical setting in providing care to clients seeking health maintenance;
    • apply principles of infection control in client care;
    • apply the steps of the nursing process to clients seeking health maintenance;
    • utilize library and multi-media resources;
    • acknowledge the role of the professional nurse in interacting with clients seeking health maintenance;
    • demonstrate effective health teaching in the clinical setting;
    • demonstrate skill in designated nursing procedures; and
    • recognize health/community resources available for health maintenance.


    Prerequisites: NU 116, NU 117 or NU 120, NU 128
    Corequisites: NU 126, BI 152, BI 153, PS 100
    F/S (C, N)

  
  •  

    NU 128 - Physical Assessment for Nurses


    Credit Hours: 3

    This is a three-credit course designed to prepare the student with a beginning knowledge base to perform a physical assessment on an adult. A basic understanding of anatomy and physiology of the human organism is expected.

    The course content includes an introduction to basic physical assessment techniques, history taking, and assessment of the following body systems: skin, head, neck, eye, ear, thorax, lungs, heart, abdomen, reproductive including breast, neurological, musculoskeletal, and urinary. The course will relate differences in physical assessment techniques and findings in the pediatric and geriatric client as well. Laboratory time will provided for students to practice each skill as discussed, under faculty supervision.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will:

    • utilize interviewing techniques to obtain a reliable health history from a selected client;
    • identify the proper techniques used in performing a physical assessment of an adult client;
    • identify cultural considerations and variations in obtaining a health history and physical assessment of a client;
    • identify variations in physical assessment of the pediatric client;
    • identify variations in physical assessment of the elderly client;
    • differentiate between normal variations and pathologic findings in assessment of each of the various body systems;
    • communicate health assessment findings in an acceptable manner; and
    • demonstrate skill in assessment of a body system.


    Corequisites: EN 110, MT 111, NU 116, NU 117 or NU 120
    F/S (C, N)

  
  •  

    NU 236 - Health Restoration -Acute/Simple


    Credit Hours: 5

    A study of the response of generally healthy individuals to acute illness which may involve generally one system. The focus will be on health restoration for clients at various stages of maturity, including clients with complications of pregnancy and/or childbirth. Concepts of management of care/leadership will also be introduced.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
     

    • explain the concept of health restoration, acute/simple;
    • describe the influence of the stages of maturity on client's requiring health restoration, acute/simple;
    • evaluate cultural beliefs and lifestyle behaviors that influence clients requiring health restoration, acute/simple;
    • cite examples of caring behaviors;
    • describe the principles of therapeutic communication;
    • demonstrate critical thinking in providing care to clients requiring health restoration, acute/simple;
    • determine infection control measures necessary for clients requiring health restoration, acute/simple;
    • identify the use of the nursing process for clients requiring health restoration, acute/simple;
    • demonstrate the use of library and multi-media resources in assessing current health related materials;
    • identify principles of management/leadership used in nursing practice in a health care setting;
    • determine health teaching for clients requiring health restoration, acute/simple; and
    • identify health/community resources available for clients requiring health restoration, acute/simple.


    Prerequisites: NU 116, NU 117 or NU 120, NU 128, NU 126, NU 127
    Corequisites: BI 230, BI 231, NU 237, PS 201
    F/S (C, N)

  
  •  

    NU 237 - Lab for NU 236


    Credit Hours: 5.5

    College and clinical laboratory experiences are designed to assist the student in management of clients with acute/simple health problems generally involving one system. Emphasis will include pediatric and adult clients in the acute care setting.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the course, the student will:
     

    • utilize the concepts of health restoration, acute/simple in caring for clients;
    • show awareness of the influence of the stages of maturity in clients requiring health restoration, acute/simple;
    • show awareness of cultural beliefs and lifestyle behaviors that influence clients requiring health restoration, acute/simple;
    • demonstrate caring behaviors in the clinical setting;
    • demonstrate therapeutic communication with selected clients;
    • apply critical thinking skills to caring for one client requiring health restoration, acute/simple;
    • utilize principles of infection control in the clinical setting;
    • apply the steps of the nursing process in caring for clients requiring health restoration, acute/simple;
    • utilize library and multimedia resources;
    • show awareness of principles of management/leadership style used in the health care setting;
    • practice effective health teaching in the clinical setting;
    • demonstrate skill in designated nursing procedures; and
    • select health/community resources available for clients requiring health restoration, acute/simple.


    Prerequisites: NU 116, NU 117 or NU 120, NU 128, NU 126, NU 127
    Corequisites: BI 230, BI 231, NU 236, PS 201
    F/S (C, N)

  
  •  

    NU 238 - Pharmacology for Nurses


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course is designed to assist the student nurse in acquiring basic knowledge in the science of drugs. Basic pharmacologic principles are introduced, but the course focus is on application of the knowledge to the provision of client care and education. The course content includes an introduction to pharmacology, including terminology, legislation, and general principles of drug action. Within each drug classification, a drug prototype will be focused on, including action, use, safe dose, side and/or adverse effects, contraindications, drug and food interactions, nursing responsibilities, and patient education.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • define medical terminology related to pharmacology;
    • define prescription, non-prescription, controlled and recreational drug;
    • list several sources of relevant drug information available to nurses;
    • explain the impact of legislation on drug therapy;
    • explain the five drug properties: purity, bioavailability, potency, efficacy, safety and toxicity;
    • list the criteria for safe drug administration;
    • identify proper recording functions of the nurse and/or family;
    • identify actions of major drug classifications;
    • name prototypes for each major drug classification;
    • describe common use of major drugs in each drug classification;
    • identify major side effects and/or adverse effects of prototypes for each major drug classification;
    • state contraindications for selected prototypes; and
    • apply nursing process to drug therapy.


    Prerequisites: NU 116, NU 117 or NU 120, NU 128, NU 126, NU 127, NU 236, NU 237
    Corequisites: NU 246, NU 247
    F/S (C, N)

  
  •  

    NU 246 - Health Restoration: Acute/Complex


    Credit Hours: 5

    A study of clients' responses to acute/chronic illness involving multiple systems. The focus will be on clients with complex acute/chronic disease state at various stages of maturity. Concepts of management of care/leadership will be synthesized into the professional role of the nurse.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the course, the student will:
     

    • explain the concept of health restoration, acute/complex;
    • describe the influence of the stages of maturity on clients requiring health restoration, acute/complex;
    • evaluate cultural beliefs and lifestyle behaviors that influence clients health restoration, acute/complex;
    • cite examples of caring behaviors;
    • describe the principles of therapeutic communication;
    • demonstrate critical thinking in providing care to clients requiring health restoration, acute/complex;
    • determine infection control measures necessary for clients' health restoration, acute/complex;
    • identify the use of the nursing process for clients requiring health restoration, acute/complex;
    • demonstrate the use of library and multi-media resources in assessing current health related materials;
    • identify principles of management/leadership used in nursing practice in a health care setting;
    • determine health teaching for clients requiring health restoration, acute/complex; and
    • identify health/community resources available for clients requiring health restoration, acute/complex.


    Prerequisites: NU 116, NU 117 or NU 120, NU 128, NU 126, NU 127, NU 236, NU 237
    Corequisites: EN 111, NU 238, NU 247
    F/S (C, N)

  
  •  

    NU 247 - Lab for NU 246


    Credit Hours: 5.5

    College and clinical laboratory experiences are designed to assist the student in management of clients with acute/chronic health problems involving multiple systems. Care settings will include acute/chronic and rehabilitative facilities. Management/leadership skills will be incorporated into the clinical experiences.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the course, the student will:

    • utilize the concepts of health restoration, acute/complex in caring for clients;
    • show awareness of the influence of the stages of maturity in clients requiring health restoration, acute/complex;
    • show awareness of cultural beliefs and lifestyle behaviors that influence clients requiring health restoration, acute/complex;
    • demonstrate caring behaviors in the clinical setting;
    • utilize therapeutic communication with selected clients;
    • apply critical thinking skills to caring for the client requiring health restoration, acute/complex;
    • utilize principles of infection control in the clinical setting;
    • apply the steps of the nursing process in caring for clients requiring health restoration, acute/complex;
    • utilize library and multimedia resources;
    • utilize leadership skills in the clinical setting;
    • practice effective health teaching in the clinical setting;
    • demonstrate skill in designated nursing procedures; and
    • select health/community resources available for the client requiring health restoration, acute/complex.


    Prerequisites: NU 116, NU 117 or NU 120, NU 127, NU 128, NU 236, NU 237, with minimum grade of "C".
    Corequisites: EN 111, NU 238, NU 246.
    F/S (C, N)


Occupational Technology

  
  •  

    OT 101 - Introduction to OT


    Credit Hours: 2

    An introductory course designed to familiarize the student with the field of occupational therapy. Major topics include professional roles/responsibilities, health care settings, ethics and standards of practice, fieldwork in education, service competency, clinical safety practices, introduction to documentation and terminology and role of research in occupational therapy. Practice will be discussed.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • understand the relationship between OT and other educational, medical, rehabilitative professionals, including recognizing and communicating the need to refer to other specialists within various settings for consultation and intervention; 
    • describe the varied roles, responsibilities, and issues of the OTA in care coordination, case management and transition services in traditional and emerging practice settings, as well as non-traditional and advanced roles such as contracted therapist, educator, entrepreneur and research assistant;
    • articulate the professional role delineation and collaborative relationship of the OTR and COTA including education, OT process, supervision and service competency;
    • describe the purpose of Level I and Level II fieldwork placement in Occupational Therapy education, and the ongoing professional duty for providing fieldwork education once qualified to do so;
    • describe OT and OTA credentialing including national certification and requirements for New York State authorization;                 
    • describe guidelines for competency-based legal and ethical OT supervision including OTR/COTA supervision and COTA/Rehab Aide supervision;
    • describe the collaborative relationship between OTA and client, caregiver, family, and significant others, in monitoring and reassessing the effect of OT intervention, and the need to communicate identified needs to the OT;
    • articulate the importance of professional research and literature, and the continued development of the profession's theories, models and practice;
    • describe personal and professional attributes, skills, knowledge and strategies required in OT practice, including collaboration with OT and colleagues; supervision; professional development; ongoing quality improvement; maintenance and organization of intervention settings; prioritizing and scheduling of workload;    
    • describe professional responsibilities related to malpractice and liability issues under current models of service provision;
    • explain and give examples of how the role of OT professional is enhanced by knowledge of and involvement in international, national, state and local OT associations and related professional associations;
    • demonstrate professional advocacy by participating in an OT professional organization activity or other agency/organization promoting the OT profession (e.g. AOTA, NYSOTA, AARP activity, Backpack Awareness Day, Disability Film Festival, etc.);
    • identify how the various practice settings (medical, community and school-system) and service continuum (acute, sub-acute and long-term) affect delivery of occupational therapy services;          
    • describe how legislation (state and federal laws and lawmaking processes) impacts OT practice, and how OT practitioners can influence legislation;
    • describe the AOTA Code of Ethics; Core Values and Attributes of OT; and AOTA Standards of Practice, and how these documents can be used as a guide for behavior, decision-making and interaction;
    • identify strategies for analyzing issues and making decisions to resolve personal and organizational ethical conflicts;
    • identify formal and informal ethical dispute-resolution systems that have regional, state and national jurisdiction over occupational therapy practice;
    • describe safety precautions and safety regulations within Occupational Therapy settings including patient/client safety, therapist safety, universal precautions and contraindications and equipment precautions;
    • describe the use and purpose of documentation in OT including documentation of OT services, ongoing processes for quality improvement, management of inventory and guidelines for effective documentation;
    • state and define common terminology related to the practice of Occupational Therapy;
    • discuss disability and its relationship to cultural diversity and cultural competency;
    • identify how college and adult learning experiences can be used to evaluate professional practice, service delivery and professional issues; and
    • describe the grief and loss process and its relationship to OT intervention.


    Prerequisites: Matriculation into OTA program and completion of all developmental English and math.
    F (N)

    *NOTE: This course is being re-written for FA 19. Course description will change as well as course outcomes and it is anticipated that the course will shift to a 3 credit course.
  
  •  

    OT 102 - Occupational Performance


    Credit Hours: 3

    Introduction to the practice framework, the utilization of occupation within the profession, task analysis, and grading and adapting of tasks will be the major focus. Study of how evaluation, treatment, and discharge planning utilizes the components of the practice framework within a variety of contexts will be incorporated as well.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • articulate the definition of occupational therapy;
    • articulate an understanding of the importance of the history and philosophical base of the profession of occupational therapy;
    • analyze and discuss how history and the social climate influence practice;
    • discuss the therapeutic use of occupation and activity to include preparatory methods, practice skills, and occupation-based activity;
    • identify how various settings such as medical facilities, school-based settings, community based settings, etc impact the delivery of occupational therapy services;
    • describe the social conditions and the ethical contexts in which humans choose to engage in occupations;
    • articulate the importance of balancing areas of occupation with achievement of health and wellness;
    • explain the role of occupation in the promotion of health and prevention of disease/disability for the individual, family, and society;
    • describe the meaning of occupation/activity to include the areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns, activity demands, contexts, and clients factors (Practice Framework);
    • identify how contextual factors impact the management and delivery of occupational therapy services;
    • exhibit the ability to analyze tasks relative to areas of occupation, performance skills, contexts and activity demands;
    • articulate the unique nature and value of occupation to consumers, employers, third party payers and the general public;
    • promote occupational therapy by educating other professionals, service providers, consumers, and the general public;
    • describe how social, economic, political, geographic, or demographic factors impact the practice of occupational therapy;
    • describe how environments, tools, materials, and occupations and can be adapted and graded to meet the needs of patients/clients/children and the socio-cultural context;
    • articulate the role of the OT and OTA within screening and evaluation, the importance of supervision, and the rationale for collaborative teamwork;
    • describe the OT process from referral through discontinuation of services to include referral to consultants and services in other areas related to the care of the individual;
    • describe the process of gathering/sharing data for the purpose of evaluating a client's participation in occupation utilizing the components of the practice framework;
    • describe when to recommend to the OT the need for referring clients for additional evaluation;
    • describe the reasons for documentation to include the rationale for service and treatment plan, ensuring accountability of service provision, and reimbursement for service;
    • describe the discharge process by: reviewing the needs of the client, family, and caregivers; recommend to the OT the need for discharge; make recommendations to include adaptations, programs, and referrals;
    • state the role of the practitioner to address changes in service delivery and to promote changes within the delivery system;
    • describe the various reimbursement systems to include federal, state, third party, and private pay; and
    • identify strategies to assist the consumer in gaining access to OT services.


    Prerequisites: Matriculation in OTA program and completion of developmental English and math.
    F (N)

    The Course Outline for OT 102 is in the process of a re-write for FA 19. The course description and course outcomes are anticipated to change.
  
  •  

    OT 120 - Human Occupation Across the Life Span


    Credit Hours: 3

    Study of normal human growth and development to include physical, sensory, perceptual, cognitive, psychological and social components, as well as aspects of multi-culturalism. The course will correlate occupational performance areas, components and context to occupational therapy treatment process and activity analysis. Life role acquisition and competency will be stressed. Play and principles of play theory will be introduced.

    Course Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    • Describe and apply features of the Model of Human Occupation including:
      • concepts, principles, language;
      • application to studying human occupation across the lifespan; and
      • how it underlies the practice of occupational therapy.
    • Describe reflexes and automatic reactions in infants, children and adults including:
      • terminology;
      • ages of normal initiation and integration;
      • resultant movements, postures, and tones; and
      • relevance to occupation.
    • Explain how physical maturation is guided by the following principles:
      • cephalo to caudal;
      • proximal to distal;
      • medial to lateral;
      • mass to specific; and
      • gross-motor to fine-motor.
    • Apply Piaget's theory of cognitive development to explain:
      • Development and integration of cognitive occupational performance components throughout the lifespan;
      • development and integration of occupation;
      • impairments, disorders, and disabilities; and
      • relevance to occupational therapy evaluation and intervention.
    • Apply Erickson's theory of psychosocial development to explain:
      • development and integration of psychosocial and psychological;
      • performance-components throughout the lifespan;
      • development and integration of occupation;
      • impairments, disorders, and disabilities; and
      • relevance to occupational therapy evaluation and intervention.
    • Describe occupational performance areas (i.e. work and play) using occupational therapy-based and other relevant theories, including:
      • stages throughout the lifespan;
      • characteristics;
      • application to disability; and
      • relevance to occupational therapy evaluation and intervention.
    • Utilizing the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework describe the meaning and dynamics of occupation and activity, including integration of areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns, activity demands, contexts, and client factors across the lifespan;
    • Articulate the importance of balancing areas of occupation with achievement of health and wellness;
    • Articulate the influence of social conditions and the ethical context in which humans choose and engage in occupations;
    • Identify the impact of contextual factors (cultural, physical, social, personal, temporal, virtual) on the management and delivery of occupational therapy services;
    • Demonstrate knowledge of national and global social issues and prevailing health and welfare needs;
    • Demonstrate knowledge and appreciation of the role of sociocultural, socioeconomic, and diversity factors and lifestyle choices in contemporary society;
    • Identify the role and responsibility of occupational therapy practitioners to address changes in service delivery policy, to effect change in the systems, and recognize the opportunities for emerging practice areas;
    • Document occupational performance in an objective, behavioral, and measurable manner, based on observation, interview, survey, and assessment, utilizing terminology of the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework; and
    • Administer non-standardized and non-formal evaluation methods (including skilled observation, interview, checklists, self-assessment) to describe theoretical concepts and principles of development that are relevant to occupational therapy.


    Prerequisites: OT 101, OT 102
    S (N)

  
  •  

    OT 130 - Occupational Therapy Interventions


    Credit Hours: 4

    Students will be introduced to a variety of OT interventions related to ADL and IADL performance including dysphagia, bathing and dressing, functional and community mobility, driving and adaptive equipment. Students will also become familiar with preparatory interventions to include PAMS, orthotics, and prosthetics. Students will explore the purpose and methods of data collection through a variety of assessments across the life span. The course will include the teaching/learning process.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate an understanding of the role of OTA with regard to Occupational Therapy data collection and evaluation;
    • articulate the importance of using statistics, tests and measurements used in occupational therapy to support evidenced based practice;
    • gather and share/report data for the purpose of screening and evaluation; administer selected assessments including standardized assessments using appropriate protocols, use of occupation for the purpose of assessment  and evaluation of client outcomes;
    • identify the role of the OTA and OT in the screening and evaluation process to include the importance and rationale for supervision and collaboration;
    • identify when to recommend to the OT the need for referring clients for additional evaluation;
    • accurately measure joint range using a goniometer;
    • describe grading of muscle strength: trace through normal;
    • describe and demonstrate the use of strength assessment utilizing a dynamometer and pinch meter;
    • describe normal and abnormal tone;
    • provide therapeutic use of occupation-based activity, practice skills, and preparatory methods; 
    • select and provide direct OT interventions and procedures to enhance  health and wellness and safety of self/others during performance in ADL, IADL, work play/leisure and the OT process;
    • demonstrate PROM to both UES & LES;
    • modify home and community environments and tasks, incorporating  principles of ergonomics;
    • select and demonstrate the use of assistive technologies relative to ADLs, IADLs and seating systems to enhance occupational performance, foster participation and well-being;
    • provide training in techniques and use of equipment to enhance safe  mobility, i.e. functional mobility, transfers, wheelchair management, mobility devices;
    • provide training in techniques to enhance community mobility, public transportation, community access and driver rehabilitation;
    • demonstrate sound judgment and proper body mechanics for lifting, pushing, pulling and carrying to ensure safety of patient and therapist;
    • demonstrate the ability to measure and select wheelchairs based on client functional needs;
    • grade and adapt the environment, tools, materials, occupations, and interventions;
    • fabricate a piece of adaptive equipment appropriate to client functional needs;
    • enable feeding and eating performance (including process of bringing food/fluids from plate/cup to mouth, ability to keep and manipulate food/fluid in the mouth, initiation of swallowing) and train others in precautions and techniques while considering client and contextual factors;
    • provide fabrication, application, fitting, and training in orthotic devices used to enhance occupational performance and training in the use of prosthetic devices;
    • provide training in self-care, self-management, home management, and community/ work integration skills, as well as prevention, health and safety to client/family, or caregivers utilizing therapeutic-use-of-self and evidenced-based teaching/learning strategies and methods;
    • recognize the use of superficial and mechanical modalities as a preparatory intervention; in terms of intervention planning demonstrate safe and effective administration of superficial thermal and mechanical modalities to establish goals; while adhering to precautions and contraindications;
    • demonstrate an ability to educate and train the client, family, caregiver, and significant other to facilitate skill in occupation as well as prevention, health maintenance, health promotion, and safety; and 
    • use the teaching-learning process with client, family and significant others; collaborate with the OTR and learner to identify appropriate educational methods.


    Prerequisites: BI 150, BI 151, OT 101, OT 102
    S (N)

  
  •  

    OT 140 - Professional Issues


    Credit Hours: 1

    A lecture course designed to familiarize the student with professional and ethical issues encountered in the clinical setting. Course topics include developing effective strategies for resolving ethical dilemmas, preparing/presenting in-services, supervisory responsibilities, credentialing and professional development, quality improvement, and federal and state regulations.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: 

    • explain systems and structures that create federal and state legislation and regulation as well as implications and effects on practice;
    • identify national requirements for credentialing, requirements for licensure, certification, or registration under state laws;
    • explain the development of, marketing of, and managing of service delivery options;
    • under the direction of the occupational therapist collect, organize, and report on data to include quality assurance reports;
    • describe the documentation utilized in the ongoing processes for quality improvement and implementation of program changes to ensure quality of services;
    • identify strategies for effective, competency-based legal and ethical supervision of students, volunteers, and other non-professional personnel within an OT setting;
    • discuss the ongoing professional responsibility for providing fieldwork education and the criteria for becoming a fieldwork educator;
    • apply the OT Code of Ethics, Ethic Standards and AOTA Standards of Practice, using them as a guide for professional decision making;
    • explain how the profession is enhanced by local, state, national, and international OT associations and related professional organizations;
    • discuss strategies for ongoing professional development to ensure that practice is consistent with current and accepted standards as well as job responsibilities;
    • identify strategies for analyzing issues and making decisions to resolve personal and organizational ethical conflicts;
    • identify formal and informal ethical dispute-resolution systems that have jurisdiction over OT practice;
    • participate in organizations that promote the profession; and
    • describe steps to prepare a professional in-service.


    Prerequisites: OT 101, OT 102
    S (N)

    The Course Outline for OT 140 is in the process of a re-write for SP 19. The course number is anticipated to change to OT 240 and the course description as well as the course outcomes will change with the update.
  
  •  

    OT 141 - Level 1A Fieldwork-Research of Community Practice-Psychosocial Focus


    Credit Hours: 1

    The focus of this clinical area is to develop beginning observational skills of the student. Emphasis will be placed on exposure to patients/clients, the practice of occupational therapy, the role of various heath care professionals, and development of professional behaviors.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • describe the meaning and dynamics of occupations and activity, including the interaction of areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns, activity demands, contexts, and client factors;
    • describe roles and responsibilities of the practitioner to address changes in service delivery policies, to effect changes in the system, and to recognize opportunities in emerging practice;
    • describe contexts of healthcare, education, community, and social models or systems as they relate to the application of occupational therapy within nontraditional and emerging areas of practice;
    • demonstrate professional attributes with regard to supervision and patient/staff interaction;
    • demonstrate effective and professional behavior and communication skills with the healthcare and human services staff and modify behavior in accordance to supervision; and
    • demonstrate acceptable personal hygiene and dress for the facility and profession.

     

    Prerequisites: OT 101, OT 102
    W (N)

    The Course Outline for OT 141 is in the process of a re-write for SP 19. With the re-write, the course description as well as the course outcomes are anticipated to change as an update to the course.

  
  •  

    OT 150 - Therapeutic Use of Self


    Credit Hours: 1

    A practice skills course designed to teach students use of self within direct patient/client care settings. Interpersonal skills development, use of therapeutic groups; group protocols, role-play and cultural competence will be stressed.

    Course Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    • articulate an understanding of the importance of the history and philosophical base of the profession of occupational therapy through a personal philosophy of helping; 
    • demonstrate therapeutic use of self-including one's personality, insights, perceptions, and assumptions as part of the therapeutic process in both individual and group interaction utilizing therapeutic interpersonal techniques of attending, responding, questioning, and disclosing;
    • describe and exhibit strategies to build therapeutic relationships including empathy, trust, and respect whish are reflective of occupational therapy principles and values;
    • describe consumer, provider, cultural, social, and environmental and other contextual barriers to therapeutic closeness and how practitioners can overcome those barriers;
    • develop personal guidelines for therapeutic use of attending, responding, questioning, disclosing;
    • articulate the therapeutic use of groups including: types of groups; appropriate application of groups in treatment and rehabilitation settings; the benefits and limitations of group modalities; strategies for designing and conducting groups; and teaching-learning strategies to enhance learning through group process; and
    • develop an occupational therapy treatment or rehabilitation group session that will effectively address participant goals and program objectives related to quality of life, well-being, occupation, health, or injury prevention, considering contexts (cultural, physical, social, personal, etc.).


    Corequisites: PS 202
    S (N)

  
  •  

    OT 160 - Level 1B Fieldwork-Clinical Practice in Physical Disabilities


    Credit Hours: 1

    Students will spend 40 hours of observation and participation in an occupational therapy clinic. Major focus will be on skill development, practice of occupational therapy interventions, development of professional maturity and verbal communication skills.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

     

    DIRECT TREATMENT

    • collect relevant data regarding the patient/client/consumer from medical or service related sources to assist with the development of culturally relevant goals, occupation-based intervention plans/strategies in collaboration with the client, occupational therapist, and other professionals; (B.5.1, B.5.21, B.5.25)*;
    • select, provide, grade and adapt interventions (occupation-based, purposeful activities, preparatory methods and tasks, education and training) while demonstrating therapeutic use of self to address safety, health, and wellness for occupational performance in all life areas, client factors, performance patterns, context, and performance skills, reflecting current evidence in OT practice; (B.5.1, B.5.2, B.5.3, B.5.5, B.5.7, B.5.12, B.5.14, B.5.18, B.5.23, B.5.24)*;
    • articulate justification for and provide development, remediation, environmental adaptation, and compensation for physical, mental, cognitive, perceptual, neuromuscular, behavioral skills, and sensory functions when desired life tasks cannot be performed, and to enhance occupational performance and foster participation and well-being; (B.5.6, B.5.8, B.5.9, B.5.10, B.2.10)*; and
    • adhere to safety regulations and medical precautions as well as demonstrate safety awareness within the clinical setting. (B.2.8)*.

     

    PROFESSIONALISM

    • demonstrate professionalism in dress, time management, ability to collaborate, receive feedback, communication, and interpersonal skills (including but not limited to cooperation, flexibility, tact, and empathy), when interacting with supervisor, staff, patients/clients, family members, and caregivers; (B.5.20, B.5.21, B.5.25, B.5.7)*;
    • adhere to all facility policies and procedures as well as governmental guidelines that ensure patient/client rights and confidentiality (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996-HIPPA) and identify how they connect to the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Code of Ethics; (B. 9.5, B.9.6)*; and
    • articulate the various roles an occupational therapy assistant can engage in such as clinical practitioner, educator, and research assistant in the rehab setting. (B.5.27, B.9.7)*.

     

    COMMUNICATION:

    • review facility documentation as it relates to the rehab process and observe/participate in various areas of documentation as appropriate (daily documentation, progress notes, discharge summaries, billing, attendance, etc.) as well as patient/client care meetings and/or departmental meetings. (B.4.10, B.5.20, B.5.32, B.7.4)*.

     

    *ACOTE (Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education) Learning Standards    

    Prerequisites: Prerequisites: OT 130, OT 141, first year coursework
    S (N)

  
  •  

    OT 200 - Psychosocial Practice


    Credit Hours: 3

    Overview of psychiatric diagnoses and DSM-5 classification system as they relate to OT practice service delivery across the life span. Specific focus will be on etiology, assessment, intervention, theories and prognoses. Historical perspectives of mental health treatment will be correlated with present day, service-delivery models, and philosophy. Assessment, evaluation, and intervention techniques will be discussed and practiced.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the students will be able to:                     

    • summarize the history of mental health services as it relates to the development of the occupational therapy profession and service delivery; (B.2.1)*;
    • utilize the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM V) to differentiate among prevalent mental health disorders on the basis of symptoms and onset, and compare and contrast diagnostic criteria; (B.1.2, B.1.3, B.1.4, & B.6.1)*;
    • examine and describe current psychiatric treatment and support services as they relate to the field of occupational therapy; (B.2.2)*;
    • analyze, select, and justify treatment, rehabilitation, intervention and recovery as they relate to the provision of occupational therapy for individuals with mental health disorder(s); (B.2.7., B.5.1, B.5.2.)*;
    • apply appropriate procedures and protocols of non-standardized and standardized tools to demonstrate the ability to implement occupation-based interventions and strategies; (B.2.7., B.2.11., B.4.2., B.5.6., B.5.7)*;
    • analyze and apply knowledge of the group process to develop and implement an intervention group; (B.2.11., B.5.1., B.5.2., B.5.4., & B.5.7.)*; and
    • engage in a teaching/learning process to design and deliver a presentation that analyzes relevant models and theories related to mental health practice. (B.3.2., B.5.19.)*.

     

    *ACOTE (Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education) Learning Standards    

    Prerequisites: Prerequisites: PS 202, OT 150
    F (N)

  
  •  

    OT 209 - Physical Disabilities Practices-Lab for OT 210


    Credit Hours: 2

    Application of treatment interventions for conditions described in OT 210. Emphasis will be placed on specific activity/modality selection, treatment and goal setting.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate providing remediation and compensation for physical, mental, cognitive, perceptual, neuromuscular, and sensory functions (B.5.6 & 5.8)*;

    • describe basic features of theories, models of practice, and frames of reference that underlie the practice of occupational therapy relative to physical disabilities (B.3.1 & B.3.2)*;

    • demonstrate the ability to assist with the development of occupation-based intervention plans and strategies, including goals and methods to achieve them, by selecting and analyzing tasks relative to an occupational profile, occupations, performance skills/patterns, activity demands, contexts, and client factors within an intervention plan (B.5.1)*;

    • demonstrate the ability to select and provide direct occupational therapy interventions and procedures to enhance safety, health, and wellness, and performance in Activities of Daily Living (ADLs, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs), education, work, play, rest, sleep, leisure, and social participation for specific diagnoses/disabilities discussed in this course (B.5.2)*;

    • apply the use of thermal modalities in occupational therapy intervention through a pseudo-treatment session specific to appropriate diagnoses; demonstrate heat, ice, and paraffin; describe ultrasound, and electric stimulation (B.5.15)*;

    • demonstrate the ability to teach compensatory strategies, such as the use of technology and adaptations to the environment that support performance, participation, and well-being, when a remediation approach is no longer available to an individual with a specific physical disability (B.5.24)*; and

    • incorporate appropriate information from a scholarly report within the course's sensorimotor treatment plan project. (B.8.8)*.

    *ACOTE (Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education) Learning Standards        

    Prerequisites: OT160
    Corequisites: OT210
    F (N)

    The Course Outline for OT 209 is in re-write for SP 19. With the re-write, the course is being updated. Title, course description, and course outcomes are anticipated to change.

  
  •  

    OT 210 - Physical Disabilities


    Credit Hours: 2

    Study of various conditions found in a physical disabilities setting to include neuromuscular, orthopedic, cardiac and neurological. Terminology relative to these areas will be covered.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • define and describe occupational therapy terminology specific to medical conditions described in this course;
    • describe global social issues and prevailing health/welfare needs of populations with or at risk for disabilities and chronic conditions;
    • recognize the effects of heritable diseases, genetic conditions, disability, trauma, and injury to physical and mental health and occupational performance of the individual; and
    • discuss deficits in performance skills or clinical manifestations of a diagnosis that result in occupational therapy treatment interventions.


    Prerequisites: BI 152/BI 153, OT 160
    Corequisites: OT 209
    F (N)

    The Course Outline for OT 210 is in re-write for SP 19. With the changes to update the course, the title, course description, and course outcomes are anticipated to change.
  
  •  

    OT 218 - Disabilities of Development and Aging Lab


    Credit Hours: 1

    This laboratory course engages students in application of the OT process and practice framework as they relate to service settings, interventions, and technology across the lifespan.  Emphasis is placed on areas of occupation including work, social participation, community mobility, play/leisure, and performance skills including sensory, perceptual, motor and praxis, emotional regulation, cognitive, communication, and social.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate skills of collaboration to assist with the development of occupation-based intervention plans and strategies (including goals and methods to achieve them) based on the stated needs of the client, data gathered during the evaluation process, and current evidence in occupational therapy practice while working in collaboration with the client/family, occupational therapist, and other professionals; (B.5.1, B.5.25)*;
    • select, provide, grade and adapt interventions (occupation-based, purposeful activities, preparatory methods and tasks, education and training) while demonstrating therapeutic use of self to address safety, health, and wellness for occupational performance in all life areas, client factors, performance patterns, context, and performance skills; (B.2.8, B.5.1, B.5.2, B.5.3, B.5.5, B.5.7, B.5.12, B. 5.17, B.5.18, B.5.23, B.5.24)*;
    • articulate justification for and provide development, remediation, environmental adaptation, and teach compensatory strategies for physical, mental, cognitive, perceptual, neuromuscular, behavioral skills, and sensory functions across the lifespan (e.g. electronic aids to daily living, seating and positioning systems) when desired life tasks cannot be performed, to enhance occupational performance and foster participation and well-being; (B.5.6, B.5.8, B.5.9, B.5.10, B.2.10, B.5.24)*;
    • implement group interventions within a geriatric setting based on principles of group development and group dynamics; (B.5.4)*;                    
    • apply technologies to enhance community mobility, including public transportation, community access, and issues related to driver rehabilitation for the older individual; (B.5.13)*;
    • demonstrate task analysis in areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns, activity demands, context(s) and environments, and client factors to implement the intervention plan; (B.2.7)*;
    • facilitate discharge planning by reviewing the needs of the client, caregiver, family and significant others, available resources, and discharge environment, and identify those needs to the occupational therapist, client, and relevant others including identification of community, human, and fiscal resources as well as recommendations for environmental adaptations and home programming; (B.5.29)*; and
    • demonstrate the skills to read and understand a scholarly report. (B.8.8)*.

     

    *ACOTE (Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education) Learning Standards    

    Prerequisites: OT 120, 150, PS 202
    Corequisites: OT 219
    F (N)

  
  •  

    OT 219 - Disabilities of Development & Aging


    Credit Hours: 3

    Study of disabilities associated with the development and aging processes including congenital and acquired conditions. Students will be exposed to etiology, assessment, OT treatment theories and modalities and prognoses. Service delivery environments will also be presented including personnel, documentation, roles and responsibilities and regulations.

    Course Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    • explain the term developmental disability, including:
    • the legal criteria for developmental disability designation; and
    • social and cultural implications of developmental disability labels.
    • describe common developmental disabilities such as intellectual disabilities, neuromuscular disorders, learning disabilities, pervasive developmental disorders, and developmental vision and hearing impairments including:
    • definition and terminology;
    • common characteristics and associated conditions;
    • etiology;
    • impact on motor, process, communication/interaction skills development throughout the lifespan;
    • impact on performance areas of occupation throughout the lifespan;
    • impact on performance patterns and contexts throughout the lifespan;
    • assessment; and
    • general treatment and support interventions.
    • explain common theories and approaches utilized in occupational therapy intervention in pediatrics, school-based, and developmental disability areas of practice such as neurodevelopmental and motor learning approaches, sensory-based approaches, behavior-based including:  
    • principles and concepts;
    • examples of interventions;
    • impact on function; and
    • diagnoses and conditions where such approaches are applied.                   
    • demonstrate task analysis in areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns, activity demands, contexts and environments, and client factors to implement the intervention;
    • gather and share data for the purpose of evaluating the client's occupational performance in occupations to include an occupational profile, client factors (including values, beliefs, spirituality, and body functions), performance patterns, and contexts and environments;
    • provide development, remediation, and compensation for physical, mental, cognitive, perceptual, neuromuscular, behavioral skills, and sensory;
    • devise creative evidence-based intervention plans (goals and objectives) and strategies appropriate to age, culture, disability, and stated needs/goals, which will quality of life, well-being and function in work, self-care or play/leisure performance areas, based on developmental disability treatment theories and principles presented in class (i.e. neuro-developmental and motor learning approaches, sensory-based approaches, behavior-based approaches);
    • implement intervention strategies to remediate and/or compensate for cognitive deficits that affect occupational performance;
    • describe the varied roles, responsibilities, and common activities of occupational therapy assistant practitioners in school-based, residential, clinical, transitional, and vocational settings, including emerging and non-traditional areas of practice, and roles of educator, practitioner, and research assistant;
    • explain the relationships (including collaborative and consultative aspects) between occupational therapy personnel and other personnel within rehabilitation, medical, education, wellness, and other service;
    • understand and promote the use of appropriate home and community programming to support performance in the client's natural environment and participation in all relevant to the client; 
    • demonstrate the ability to educate the client, caregiver family, and service providers to facilitate skills on areas of occupation as well as prevention, health maintenance, and safety;
    • promote occupational therapy by educating other professionals, service providers, consumers, and the public;
    • teach compensatory strategies, such as the use of technology, adaptions to the environment that support performance, participation, and well-being;
    • summarize the provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and other laws and regulations and their influence on the contexts of education, healthcare, and service systems including:
    • right to an appropriate education for all individuals disabilities;
    • role of the individual and family in planning services;
    • related services;
    • early intervention services;
    • transition services; and           
    • response to intervention.
    • outline the components of the Individualized Education (IEP) and explain its impact on occupational therapy assessment, treatment, re-assessment, documentation, as well as collaborative, consultative, and direct service roles of the occupational therapy practitioner;
    • summarize New York State regulations on identifying and reporting cases of child abuse and neglect including:
    • definition of child abuse and neglect;
    • signs of abuse or neglect;
    • social and cultural values related to child rearing;
    • process of reporting suspected abuse or neglect; and
    • role and responsibility of the mandated reporter.
    • use professional literature to make evidenced-based practice decisions in collaboration with the occupational therapist;
    • describe local community facilities available that available to house, train, educate, employ, enhance well-being, and restore function of elderly individuals with disabilities;
    • describe restraint-free environment and mechanisms for preventing falls and injuries within treatment and care facilities;
    • describe treatment, wellness and health interventions for aging populations including:
    • contracture screenings and assessments;
    • therapeutic positioning; and
    • sensory.
    • describe components utilized in the documentation of geriatric occupational therapy services related to:
    • RUGS; and
    • MDS.
    • describe common disorders related to aging that impact sensory, motor, cognitive/process, communication/interaction skills development.


    Prerequisites: OT 120, OT 130, OT 150, OT 160, PS 100, PS 202
    Corequisites: OT 218
    F (N)

  
  •  

    OT 222 - Technology in Documentation and Research-Lab


    Credit Hours: 1

    A laboratory course designed to familiarize the student with use of technology within professional research and electronic documentation systems. Distance communication, virtual environments and telehealth/telemed technology to support performance, participation, and well-being of recipients of OT services will be covered. In addition, students will construct the following: treatment plans; progress notes; D/C summaries; and ADL and home assessments to ensure accountability of service provision and reimbursement services.

    Course Outcomes
    At the end of this course, students will be able to:

    • utilize the computer to access appropriate databases reflective of clinical and professional research;
    • articulate the importance of using statistics, tests, and measurements for the purpose of delivering evidence-based practice;
    • apply the use of technology in electronic documentation to effectively communicate to other health care providers and support the transfer of information;
    • apply the use of technology in distance communication, virtual environments, and telehealth/telemed to support performance, participation, and well being of individuals receiving OT services;
    • demonstrate documentation of OT services to ensure accountability of service provision and meet standards for reimbursement of services adhering to facility, governmental. and reimbursement agencies;
    • effectively document  and communicate the need and rationale for OT services to meet the standards for reimbursement;
    • describe the various reimbursement systems (i.e., federal, state, third party, private-payers) and documentation requirements that affect the practice of OT services;
    • write goals, progress notes, ADL assessments, and assessments;
    • write a discharge summary to demonstrate the need for termination of OT services when stated outcomes have been achieved or it has been determined that they could not be achieved;
    • articulate the importance of how scholarly activities and literature contribute to the development of the profession;
    • effectively locate and discuss information, including the of information;
    • identify how scholarly activities can be used to professional practice, service delivery, and /or professional issues; and
    • demonstrate the skills to read and understand a report.


    Prerequisites: EN 110, OT 160
    F (N)

    *Computer literacy is required prior to admission in the Occupational Therapy Assistant Program, either through life experience or as a remedial course such as CS 101.
  
  •  

    OT 239 - Level II A Fieldwork


    Credit Hours: 6

    Eight (8) weeks, full time (as defined by fieldwork placement site), intensive experience in the delivery of occupational therapy services.  Supervised practice of treatment intervention, documentation, assessment and professional communication will be emphasized.  Fieldwork sites may include:  physical disabilities (such as acute care, long term care, in-patient/sub-acute rehab), psychosocial, developmental disabilities, school-based and emerging practice areas.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    DIRECT TREATMENT

    • collect relevant data regarding the patient/client/consumer from medical or service related sources to assist with the development, monitoring and re-assessment of culturally relevant goals, occupation-based intervention plans/strategies and discharge planning in collaboration with the client, occupational therapist and other professionals (B.4.1, B.4.4, B.5.1, B.5.21, B.5.25, B.5.29)*;
    • select, provide/fabricate, grade and adapt interventions (occupation-based, purposeful activities, preparatory methods and tasks, education and training including compensatory strategies) to individuals and/or groups while demonstrating therapeutic use of self to address safety, health and wellness for occupational performance in all life areas, client factors, performance patterns, context and performance skills, reflecting basic theoretical features and models of practice and frameworks of occupational therapy and current evidence in OT practice (B.2.11, B.3.1, B.3.2, B.5.1, B.5.2, B.5.3, B.5.4, B.5.5, B.5.7, B.5.12, B.5.14, B.5.18, B.5.23, B.5.24, B.5.28)*;
    • articulate justification for and provide training in techniques for the development, remediation, environmental adaptation, and compensation for physical, mental, cognitive, perceptual, neuromuscular, behavioral skills and sensory functions when desired life tasks cannot be performed, to enhance occupational performance and foster participation and well-being (B.2.10, B.5.6, B.5.8, B.5.9, B.5.10, B.5.11, B.5.12, B.5.13, B.5.14, B.5.15)*; and
    • adhere to safety regulations and medical precautions as well as demonstrate safety awareness within the fieldwork setting (B.2.8)*.

    COMMUNICATION:

    • demonstrate appropriate and effective verbal and written communication skills in all applicable areas within the fieldwork setting, including but not limited to patient/client/consumer, family and caregiver interactions and education, staff, inter and intradisciplinary team member interactions, documentation, billing and education/in-service presentation, etc. (B.5.21, B.1.8, B.4.10, B.5.20, B.5.32, B.7.4)*.

    PROFESSIONALISM:

    • demonstrate professionalism in dress, time management, ability to collaborate, receive feedback, communication and interpersonal skills (including, but not limited to, cooperation, flexibility, tact and empathy), when interacting with supervisor, staff, patients/clients, family members and caregivers (B.5.20, B.5.21, B.5.25, B.5.7)*;
    • adhere to all facility policies and procedures as well as governmental guidelines that ensure patient/client rights and confidentiality (including, but not limited to, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA) and Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)) and identify how they connect to the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Code of Ethics (B. 9.5, B.9.6)*; and
    • articulate and/or demonstrate the various roles an occupational therapy assistant can engage in such as clinical practitioner, educator, program coordinator, research assistant, etc. in the fieldwork setting (B.5.27, B.9.7)*.

    *ACOTE (Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education) Learning Standards    

    Prerequisites: Completion of all didactic coursework for the program and level I fieldwork experiences (OT 141 & OT 160)
    Corequisites: Co-requisite: OT 251 *As per the Accreditation Council of Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE), two level II fieldwork experiences are offered for the AAS in OTA, through OT 239 and OT 251. These two level II fieldwork experiences must be 8 weeks each of full-time hours, as defined by the fieldwork placement site, and must be in two diverse practice areas of occupational therapy. These two level II fieldwork experiences, as offered through OT 239 and OT 251, have the same course outcomes and program competencies, but reflect two diverse practice areas of occupational therapy services. Practice areas of occupational therapy services may include, but are not limited to: physical disabilities, mental health/psychosocial practice, school-based services, adult DD/ID services, or an emerging practice area.
    S (N)

  
  •  

    OT 251 - Level II B Fieldwork


    Credit Hours: 6

    Eight (8) weeks, full time (as defined by fieldwork placement site), intensive experience in the delivery of occupational therapy services.  Supervised practice of treatment intervention, documentation, assessment, and professional communication will be emphasized.  Fieldwork sites may include the following: physical disabilities (such as acute care, long term care, in-patient/sub-acute rehab), psychosocial, developmental disabilities, school-based, and emerging practice areas. 

    Co-requisite: OT239 * as per the Accreditation Council of Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE), two (2) Level II Fieldwork experiences are offered for the A.A.S. in OTA, through OT239 and OT251.  These two (2) Level II Fieldwork experiences must be eight (8) weeks each of full time hours, as defined by the fieldwork placement site, and must be in two (2) diverse practice areas of occupational therapy.  These two (2) Level II Fieldwork experiences, as offered through OT239 and OT251, have the same Course Outcomes and Program Competencies, but reflect two (2) diverse practice areas of Occupational Therapy services.  Practice areas of Occupational Therapy services may include, but are not limited to: Physical Disabilities, Mental Health/Psycho-social Practice, School-based services, Adult DD/ID services, or an emerging practice area.

    Prerequisite: completion of all didactic coursework for the program and Level I Fieldwork experiences (OT141 and OT160).

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

     

    DIRECT TREATMENT:

    • collect relevant data regarding the patient/client/consumer from medical or service related sources to assist with the development, monitoring and re-assessment of culturally relevant goals, occupation-based intervention plans/strategies and discharge planning in collaboration with the client, occupational therapist, and other professionals (B.4.1, B.4.4, B.5.1, B.5.21, B.5.25, B.5.29)*;
    • select, provide/fabricate, grade and adapt interventions (occupation-based, purposeful activities, preparatory methods and tasks, education and training including compensatory strategies) to individuals and/or groups while demonstrating therapeutic use of self to address safety, health and wellness for occupational performance in all life areas, client factors, performance patterns, context, and performance skills, reflecting basic theoretical features and models of practice and frameworks of occupational therapy and current evidence in OT practice (B.2.11, B.3.1, B.3.2, B.5.1, B.5.2, B.5.3, B.5.4, B.5.5, B.5.7, B.5.12, B.5.14, B.5.18, B.5.23, B.5.24, B.5.28)*;
    • articulate justification for and provide training in techniques for the development, remediation, environmental adaptation, and compensation for physical, mental, cognitive, perceptual, neuromuscular, behavioral skills, and sensory functions when desired life tasks cannot be performed, to enhance occupational performance and foster participation and well-being and (B.2.10, B.5.6, B.5.8, B.5.9, B.5.10, B.5.11, B.5.12, B.5.13, B.5.14, B.5.15)*; and
    • adhere to safety regulations and medical precautions as well as demonstrate safety awareness within the fieldwork setting (B.2.8)*

     

    COMMUNICATION:

    • demonstrate appropriate and effective verbal and written communication skills in all applicable areas within the fieldwork setting, including but not limited to patient/client/consumer, family and caregiver interactions and education, staff, inter and intradisciplinary team member interactions, documentation, billing and education/in-service presentation, etc. (B.5.21, B.1.8, B.4.10, B.5.20, B.5.32, B.7.4)*
       

    PROFESSIONALISM:

    • demonstrate professionalism in dress, time management, ability to collaborate, receive feedback, communication, and interpersonal skills (including but not limited to cooperation, flexibility, tact, and empathy), when interacting with supervisor, staff, patients/clients, family members, and caregivers (B.5.20, B.5.21, B.5.25, B.5.7)*;
    • adhere to all facility policies and procedures as well as governmental guidelines that ensure patient/client rights and confidentiality including, but not limited to: Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA) and Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), and identify how they connect to the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Code of Ethics (B. 9.5, B.9.6)*; and
    • articulate and/or demonstrate the various roles an occupational therapy assistant can engage in such as clinical practitioner, educator, program coordinator, research assistant, etc. in the fieldwork setting (B.5.27, B.9.7)*

     

    *ACOTE (Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education) Learning Standards

    Prerequisites: Completion of all didactic coursework for the program and Level I Fieldwork experiences (OT141 & OT160)
    Corequisites: OT239* as per the Accreditation Council of Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE), two (2) Level II Fieldwork experiences are offered for the A.A.S. in OTA, through OT239 and O 251. These two (2) Level II Fieldwork experiences must be eight (8) weeks each of full time hours as defined by the fieldwork placement site, and must be in two (2) diverse practice areas of occupational therapy. These two (2) Level II Fieldwork experiences, as offered through OT239 and OT251, have the same Course Outcomes and Program Competencies, but reflect two (2) diverse practice areas of Occupational Therapy services. Practice areas of Occupational Therapy services may include, but are not limited to: Physical Disabilities, Mental Health/Psycho-social Practice, School-based services, Adult DD/ID services, or an emerging practice area.
    S (N)

  
  •  

    OT 256 - Biomechanics in OT


    Credit Hours: 2

    A study of the biomechanical relationship of human movement and activity. Concepts discussed in lab will include kinematics, dynamics, energy, simple machines and work will be applied to human movement, daily activities and OT treatment intervention.

    Course Outcomes
    At the end of the course the student will be able to:

    • employ logical thinking, critical analysis, problem solving, and creativity with the area of biomechanics and treatment intervention;
    • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the structure and function of the human body within the scope of biomechanics;
    • define and differentiate between biomechanics and kinesiology;
    • describe the relationship of biomechanics and OT models of practice;
    • describe the various muscle contractions;
    • describe center of gravity and base of support (Newton's Law) and their effects on static and dynamic balance;
    • describe gravitational influence on daily activity and exceptionalities: wheelchair positioning, transfers, assisted ambulation;
    • demonstrate the use and influence of levers and torque within the musculoskeletal system, activity, and treatment;
    • demonstrate techniques to enhance mobility to include: transfers, trunk stabilization, and W/C positioning;
    • describe biomechanical principles utilized in the design/fabrication of orthotic devices;
    • design and fabricate a static splint applying biomechanical principles;
    • describe biomechanical remediation for deficits ROM, tone, strengthening, coordination, endurance, and pain management;
    • describe compensatory rehab approaches to OT treatment to include adaptations/adaptive equipment, energy conservation, work simplification, joint protection, and patient/client education; and
    • correlate biomechanical and compensatory rehab approaches to treatment planning and intervention.


    Prerequisites: BI 152/BI 153, OT 130
    F (N)

 

Page: 1 <- 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14