Oct 22, 2020  
Spring 2019 Catalog 
    
Spring 2019 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 Key to Course Descriptions

 Course Description

Abbreviations
 

(C) City Campus F/S Fall and Spring
(N) North Campus SS Summer Session
(S) South Campus F+ Offered every other Fall
F Fall S+ Offered every other Spring
S Spring N Non-Credit

 

Course Outlines

Course outlines for all courses described in this catalog are available for viewing. To explore the general framework of a course design and view the expectations of student performance within a select course click on the link below. These descriptions provide the base upon which instructors build their own course syllabi for the individual sections offered by the academic departments. Individual sections may therefore vary somewhat from the descriptions given in the outlines.

Course Outlines

 

Telecommunications Technology

  
  •  

    TE 181 - IT Essentials II


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course will introduce skills required to install, configure, upgrade, and maintain PC workstations, the Windows OS and SOHO networks. Students will utilize troubleshooting techniques and tools to effectively and efficiently resolve PC, OS, and network connectivity issues and implement security practices. This course also helps students prepare for the CompTIA A+ Practical Application exam, which builds on the CompTIA A+ Essentials knowledge and skills, with more of a hands-on orientation and scenarios in which troubleshooting and tools must be applied to resolve problems.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    • install, configure and maintain personal computer components;
    • detect problems, troubleshoot and repair/replace personal computer and laptop components;
    • analyze and trouble-shoot digital systems used in the creation and transport of digital information and conversion to analog output;
    • select and use the proper tools;
    • detect and resolve common printer issues;
    • select the appropriate commands and options to troubleshoot and resolve problems;
    • differentiate between Windows Operating System directory structures;
    • select and use system utilities / tools and evaluate the results;
    • troubleshoot client-side network connectivity issues using appropriate tools;
    • install and configure a small office home office (SOHO) network;
    • prevent, troubleshoot and remove viruses and malware; and
    • implement security and troubleshoot common issues.


    Prerequisites: TE 180 or permission of the instructor.
    F/S (S)

  
  •  

    TE 185 - Network Fundamentals


    Credit Hours: 3

    This is the first of four courses in the CCNA track and is intended to teach students the fundamentals of computer networks and provide students with the starting point for learning to design, build, and troubleshoot computer networks. This course is also designed, in part, to prepare students for the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) and the Cisco Certified Entry-Level (CCENT) exams. CCNA certification validates a person's ability to install, configure, operate, and troubleshoot medium-size routed and switched networks, including implementation and verification of connections to remote sites in a WAN.

    Course topics include, but are not limited to, focus on IP Networks, Network Devices, OSI, TCP/IP and IP Addressing, LAN/WAN Topology and Design, and Router and Switch IOS Basics.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    • understand and describe the devices and services used to support communications in data networks and the Internet;
    • understand and describe the importance of addressing and naming schemes at various layers of data networks in IPv4 and IPv6 environments;
    • design, calculate, and apply subnet masks and addresses to fulfill given requirements in IPv4 and IPv6 networks;
    • explain fundamental Ethernet concepts such as media, services, and operations;
    • build a simple Ethernet network using routers and switches;
    • use Cisco command-line interface (CLI) commands to perform basic router and switch configurations; and 
    • utilize common network utilities to verify small network operations and analyze data traffic.


    F/S (S)

  
  •  

    TE 212 - Telecommunications IV


    Credit Hours: 3

    A survey of current and emerging technologies in telecommunications will be presented. Topics included are telecommunications access and transport technologies, VOIP, wireless communications and network security. Lectures, interactive learning, demonstration and site visits will be employed. Laboratory exercises will be required.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    • explain Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) transmission and cell structure;
    • describe Synchronous Optical Network (SONET) transport and frame structure;
    • demonstrate the Digital Subscriber Line (xDSL) access technology;
    • analyze Frame Relay access;
    • clarify modern modulation techniques and applications;
    • illustrate fiber optic access technologies (FTTx) and fiber networks;
    • define wireless telecommunications methods and systems;
    • compare services over IP;
    • explain cryptography;
    • understand computer and network security; and
    • research and present details of a new communications technology;
    • analyze and trouble-shoot digital systems used in the creation and transport of digital information and conversion to analog output;
    • use various software packages to create documents, spreadsheets, graphs, databases and presentations;
    • design voice, data, LAN and WAN telecommunications networks;
    • demonstrate proficiency in the installation of telecommunication end-user equipment, switching and transmission equipment;
    • be proficient in the use of various topologies, transmission media, network interfaces and shared resources to interconnect telecommunications networks; and
    • present current and emerging technologies in telecommunications to a residential or commercial client.


    Prerequisites: TE 210 or permission of the instructor.
    S (S)

  
  •  

    TE 218 - Help Desk Professional


    Credit Hours: 3

    A comprehensive course designed to examine all aspects of computer customer support technologies. Emphasis will be placed on customer satisfaction, communication and technical writing skills, troubleshooting, incident prevention, and stress management in a technical setting. Basic first contact resolution in an IT service desk will be explored.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • define Help Desk and its role in organizations and how it can improve business;
    • recognize technologies that impact the Help Desk when used to collect information and deliver support; and
    • communicate technical instructions effectively for non-technicians.


  
  •  

    TE 222 - Television Production


    Credit Hours: 4

    Course provides a survey of the equipment and techniques required to produce audio and video presentations for distribution by various media channels. Topics include basic set design and construction techniques, lighting for video, camera techniques, visual composition, audio techniques and introduction to sound design, studio control, script formats, production planning and execution, and introduction to editing. Extensive hands-on experience is incorporated in the laboratory environment.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate technical proficiency in creating video content for distribution through various telecommunications channels;
    • set up document, robotic, and studio color camera(s) for video production and/or teleconferencing;
    • edit a short program on a linear and non-linear video editing system;
    • read and execute floor plans for staging, scenery, props, and lighting;
    • setup and operate audio equipment for TV productions including microphones, CD, digital audio software, computer resources, and analog mixer;
    • setup and operate video equipment for TV productions, including switcher, character and graphics generators, cameras, and video tapes recorders;
    • setup and use editing equipment and software to edit a finished project; and
    • integrate umbrella competencies and technical competencies in the workplace.


    F/S (S)

  
  •  

    TE 232 - Electronics II


    Credit Hours: 3

    The course is a study of electronic communications systems. Systems studied include electronic filters, timers, oscillators, modulators, mixers, converters and amplifiers. Their applications are further examined within communications as modulators, multiplexers, A to D and D to A converters, antennas and transmission lines and in data transmission. Communication over free-space, wired and optical media are studied. Analog, digital, linear and non-linear methods are examined. Input/output relationships are observed through hardware and software labs.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • use software and hardware to build, measure, and troubleshoot electronic communication circuits;
    • analyze the operation of low pass, high pass, band pass and band stop filters;
    • become proficient in constructing and testing filter circuits;
    • demonstrate capability in explaining oscillator concepts as they apply to communications;
    • gain proficiency in traditional electronic modulation techniques including AM, FM and pulse modulation;
    • assemble a simple amplitude modulator;
    • understand high level digital modulation techniques for contemporary communications;
    • possess knowledge of multiplexing and timing concepts;
    • demonstrate an understanding of the principles and applications of phase locked loops, oscillators, AtoD/DtoA converters and mixers;
    • build a phase locked loop to match Instructor specifications;
    • specify transmission lines by application;and
    • select antennas based on signal radio frequency characteristics.


    Prerequisites: TE 135
    F (S)

  
  •  

    TE 240 - Digital II


    Credit Hours: 4

    Course is a further exploration of the operating systems, software, networking technologies and management of the computer systems introduced in Digital I. Further integration of the hardware and software into communications systems, the digitization and transport of both analog and digital data are also discussed and demonstrated. Basic troubleshooting and repair techniques for both hardware and software are discussed and demonstrated. System and network security and encryption are introduced. Extensive hands-on experience is provided in the laboratory setting.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: 

    • analyze the difference and similarities from personal computers to notebooks, tablets, PDAs and other handheld devices;
    • demonstrate a basic understanding of networks;
    • show how to manage and support Windows security, registry, and recovery methods;
    • demonstrate how to customize the computer for each individual customer use; and
    • explain how to work with support services.


    Prerequisites: TE 145 or permission of the instructor.
    F (S)

  
  •  

    TE 270 - Routing and Switching I


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a small network. Students learn how to configure a router and a switch for basic functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with RIPv1, RIPv2, single-area and multi-area OSPF, virtual LANs, and inter-VLAN routing in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • understand and describe basic switching concepts and the operation of Cisco switches;
    • understand and describe enhanced switching technologies such as VLANs, VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP), Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and 802.1q;
    • configure and troubleshoot basic operations of a small switched network;
    • understand and describe the purpose, nature, and operations of a router, routing tables, and the route lookup process;
    • configure and verify static routing and default routing;
    • understand and describe how VLANs create logically separate networks and how routing occurs between them;
    • understand and describe dynamic routing protocols, distance vector routing protocols, and link-state routing protocols;
    • configure and troubleshoot basic operations of routers in a small routed network, like:
    • a. Routing Information Protocol (RIPv1 and RIPv2)
    • b. Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) protocol (single-area OSPF)
    • c. VLANs and inter-VLAN routing
    • configure, monitor, and troubleshoot ACLs for IPv4 and IPv6.
    • configure and troubleshoot Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) and Domain Name System (DNS) for IPv4 and IPv6; and
    • configure and troubleshoot Network Address Translation (NAT) operations.


    Prerequisites: TE 185
    F/S (S)

  
  •  

    TE 271 - Routing and Switching II


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a larger and more complex network. Students learn how to configure routers and switches for advanced functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with OSPF, EIGRP, STP, and VTP in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement DHCP and DNS operations in a network.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    • configure and troubleshoot DHCP and DNS operations for IPv4 and IPv6;
    • understand and describe the operations and benefits of the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP);
    • configure and troubleshoot STP operations;
    • understand and describe the operations and benefits of link aggregation and Cisco VLAN Trunk Protocol (VTP);
    • configure and troubleshoot VTP, STP, and RSTP;
    • configure and troubleshoot basic operations of routers in a complex routed network for IPv4 and IPv6;
    • configure and troubleshoot Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) protocol (single-area OSPF and multi-area OSPF);
    • configure and troubleshoot Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP);
    • configure and troubleshoot advanced operations of routers and implement RIP, OSPF, and EIGRP routing protocols for IPv4 and IPv6; and
    • manage Cisco IOS® Software licensing and configuration files.

     

    Prerequisites: TE 270
    F/S (S)

  
  •  

    TE 272 - Accessing the WAN


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course discusses the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network. The course enables students to understand the selection criteria of network devices and WAN technologies to meet network requirements. Students learn how to configure and troubleshoot network devices and resolve common issues with data link protocols. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement IPSec and virtual private network (VPN) operations in a complex network

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    • understand and describe different WAN technologies and their benefits;
    • understand and describe the operations and benefits of virtual private networks (VPNs) and tunneling;
    • configure and troubleshoot serial connections;
    • configure and troubleshoot broadband connections;
    • configure and troubleshoot IPSec tunneling operations;
    • monitor and troubleshoot network operations using syslog, SNMP, and NetFlow;
    • design network architectures;
    • understand, describe, and design borderless networks; and
    • understand, describe, and design data centers and virtualization.


    Prerequisites: TE 271
    F/S (S)

  
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    TE 275 - CCNA Security


    Credit Hours: 3

    CCNA Security equips students with the knowledge and skills needed to prepare for entry-level security specialist careers. This course is a hands-on, career-oriented e-learning solution that emphasizes practical experience. CCNA Security is a blended curriculum with both online and classroom learning. CCNA Security aims to develop an in-depth understanding of network security principles as well as the tools and configurations available. The following tools are covered: protocol sniffers/analyzers, TCP/IP and common desktop utilities, Cisco IOS Software, Cisco VPN client, Packet Tracer (PT), and Web-based resources. The predominant lab types are procedural, skills integration challenges, troubleshooting, and model building.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • explain the importance of data networks and the Internet in supporting business. communications and everyday activities;
    • explain how communication works in data networks and the Internet;
    • describe the security threats facing modern network infrastructures;
    • secure network device access;
    • implement AAA on network devices;
    • mitigate threats to networks using ACLs;
    • implement secure network management and reporting;
    • mitigate common Layer 2 attacks;
    • implement the Cisco IOS firewall feature set;
    • implement the Cisco IOS IPS feature set;
    • implement site-to-site IPSec VPNs; and
    • administer effective security policies.


    Prerequisites: TE 272
    F/S (S)

  
  •  

    TE 276 - CCNP I:Implementing IP Switching


    Credit Hours: 4

    This course teaches students how to implement, monitor, and maintain switching in converged enterprise campus networks. Students will learn how to plan, configure, and verify the implementation of complex enterprise switching solutions. The course also covers the secure integration of VLANs, WLANs, voice, and video into campus networks. Comprehensive labs emphasize hands-on learning and practice to reinforce configuration skills.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    • implement, monitor, and maintain switching in an enterprise campus network;
    • implement VLANs in campus networks;
    • configure and optimize high availability and redundancy on switches;
    • describe and implement LAN security features; and
    • plan and prepare for advanced services in a campus infrastructure.


    Prerequisites: TE 272
    F/S (S)

  
  •  

    TE 277 - CCNP II:Implementing IP Routing


    Credit Hours: 4

    This course teaches students how to implement, monitor, and maintain routing services in an enterprise network. Students will learn how to plan, configure, and verify the implementation of complex enterprise LAN and WAN routing solutions, using a range of routing protocols in IPv4 and IPv6 environments. The course also covers the configuration of secure routing solutions to support branch offices and mobile workers. Comprehensive labs emphasize hands-on learning and practice to reinforce configuration skills.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    • explain complex network requirements and design models for implementing advanced routing services in an enterprise network;
    • implement EIGRP and OSPF in an enterprise network;
    • implement various mechanisms for controlling routing updates and traffic;
    • implement path control using IP SLA and PBR;
    • implement BGP to allow an enterprise network to connect to an ISP;
    • describe a basic implementation for branch office and mobile worker connectivity; and
    • describe and configure IPv6 in an enterprise network.


    Prerequisites: TE 276
    F/S (S)

  
  •  

    TE 278 - CCNP III:Maintaining and Troubleshooting IP Networks


    Credit Hours: 4

    This course teaches students how to monitor and maintain complex, enterprise routed and switched IP networks. Skills learned include the planning and execution of regular network maintenance, as well as support and troubleshooting using technology based processes and best practices, based on systematic and industry recognized approaches. Extensive labs emphasize hands-on learning and practice to reinforce troubleshooting techniques.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    • plan and document the most common maintenance functions in complex enterprise networks;
    • develop a troubleshooting process to identify and solve problems in complex enterprise networks;
    • select tools that best support specific troubleshooting and maintenance processes in large, complex enterprise networks;
    • practice maintenance procedures and fault resolution in routing and switched environments;
    • troubleshoot NAT/PAT, DHCP, and other services;
    • troubleshoot wireless connectivity, VoIP, and video; and
    • practice maintenance procedures and fault resolution in a secure infrastructure and complex environment.


    Prerequisites: TE 276, TE 277
    F/S (S)

  
  •  

    TE 279 - CCNA Voice


    Credit Hours: 3

    CCNA Voice teaches learners how to maintain and operate a Cisco Unified Communications solution that is based on Cisco Unified Communications Manager, Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express, Cisco Unity Connection, and Cisco Unified Presence. This course provides the learners with the knowledge and skills to achieve associate-level competency in Cisco Unified Communications. The course also introduces the architecture, components, functionality, and features of Cisco Unified Communications solutions and describes how daily job tasks--such as system monitoring, moves, adds, and change--are performed on Cisco Unified Communications products.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to:

    • describe the components of a Cisco Unified Communications solution and identify call signaling and media stream flows;
    • provide an overview of administrator and end-user interface options with Cisco Unified Communications products and perform endpoint and end-user administration tasks;
    • understand call flows in Cisco Unified Communications Manager and Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express;
    • describe the telephony features supported in Cisco Unified Communications Manager and Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express;
    • administer users in Cisco Unity Connection and Cisco Unified Presence, and enable the most commonly used features for both applications; and
    • describe how to maintain a Cisco Unified Communications solution.


    Prerequisites: TE 271
    F (S)

  
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    TE 291 - Internship


    Credit Hours: 1

    This internship will offer students an opportunity to fulfill their interest in related communications technology. Cooperative placement will be sought during which the student can gain a direct and practical field experience under selected leadership and affiliates by advisement.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • perform the tasks related to their job assignment;
    • be proficient in the use of various topologies, transmission media, network interfaces and shared resources to interconnect telecommunications networks;
    • present current and emerging technologies in telecommunications to a residential or commercial client; and
    • demonstrate an ability to accomplish with others assigned job tasks in a work environment provided by the internship program.

     

    S (S)

  
  •  

    TE 292 - Internship


    Credit Hours: 2

    This internship will offer students an opportunity to fulfill their interest in related communications technology. Cooperative placement will be sought during which the student can gain a direct and practical field experience under selected leadership and affiliates by advisement.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • perform the tasks related to their job assignment;
    • be proficient in the use of various topologies, transmission media, network interfaces and shared resources to interconnect telecommunications networks;
    • present current and emerging technologies in telecommunications to a residential or commercial client; and
    • demonstrate an ability to accomplish with others assigned job tasks in a work environment provided by the internship program.


    S (S)

  
  •  

    TE 293 - Internship


    Credit Hours: 3

    This internship will offer students an opportunity to fulfill their interest in related communications technology. Cooperative placement will be sought during which the student can gain a direct and practical field experience under selected leadership and affiliates by advisement.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • perform the tasks related to their job assignment;
    • be proficient in the use of various topologies, transmission media, network interfaces and shared resources to interconnect telecommunications networks;
    • present current and emerging technologies in telecommunications to a residential or commercial client; and
    • demonstrate an ability to accomplish with others assigned job tasks in a work environment provided by the internship program.

     

    S (S)

  
  •  

    TE 294 - Internship


    Credit Hours: 4

    This internship will offer students an opportunity to fulfill their interest in related communications technology. Cooperative placement will be sought during which the student can gain a direct and practical field experience under selected leadership and affiliates by advisement.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • perform the tasks related to their job assignment;
    • be proficient in the use of various topologies, transmission media, network interfaces and shared resources to interconnect telecommunications networks;
    • present current and emerging technologies in telecommunications to a residential or commercial client; and
    • demonstrate an ability to accomplish with others assigned job tasks in a work environment provided by the internship program.

     

    S (S)


Therapeutic Recreation

  
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    TH 100 - Orientation to Disability Groups


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course is designed to provide a broad spectrum of information on disabilities, their causes, characteristics, and adaptations needed to live a quality life.  We will cover physical, mental, and developmental disabilities occurring in the general population for all age groups and how they can be related to by professionals in the recreation and physical education fields.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • describe common disabilities and their associated illnesses;
    • define basic medical and psychiatric terminology relating to disabilities;
    • describe programming techniques used to modify and conduct recreational and physical education activities for individuals with disabilities; and
    • identify agencies in the community which service individuals with disabilities.

     

     

    F/S (C, S)


Vision Care Technology

  
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    VC 100 - Ophthalmic Dispensing I


    Credit Hours: 2

    Introduction to history and development of opticianry, basic anatomy and physiology of the eye, eye planes and interocular distances, and visual acuity.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the course, the student should be able to:

    • list and identify historical and evolutionary developments related to opticianry;
    • list laws governing opticianry in New York State;
    • list and identify anatomical and physiological functions of the human eye;
    • analyze eye planes and interocular distances related to ophthalmic lenses;
    • list and discuss visual acuity testing systems; and
    • list and identify refractive abnormalities of the eye.


    F (N)

  
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    VC 110 - Ophthalmic Lenses I


    Credit Hours: 3

    Ophthalmic lens history, development, manufacture and properties of quality ophthalmic lens materials. Areas of study include the visible spectrum and the effects of lenses on light rays. Single vision lens power analysis including spherical, sphero-cylinder and prism lenses.  Formulas based on lens construction and function are included.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course the student will be able to:

    • distinguish and list the components of the electromagnetic spectrum;
    • describe the action of light rays through refracting mediums;
    • distinguish between various single vision lens forms;
    • identify and describe basic and advance lens forms;
    • apply correct formulas that relate to lens function; and
    • describe various lens materials and identify specific characteristics of each.

     

    F (N)

  
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    VC 133 - Introduction to Contact Lens Laboratory


    Credit Hours: 1

    A course designed to assist the student in understanding the history, development and manufacturing of contact lenses. Anatomical data of the eye with emphasis on the tears, lids and cornea will be outlined. Indications, contraindications and patient selection will be identified. Description of both rigid and soft lenses will be outlined. Usage of instrumentation and development of psychomotor skills will be emphasized.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • identify New York State laws governing the contact lens field;
    • list individuals who made contributions to the contact lens field;
    • identify anatomical structures related to contact lens wear;
    • discuss contact lens materials and designs;
    • explain indications, contraindications, advantages and disadvantages of contact lenses;
    • discuss the use of contact lens solutions; and 
    • demonstrate psychomotor skills using the keratometer, radiuscope, diameter gauge, and thickness gauge.


    F (N)

  
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    VC 140 - Ophthalmic Assisting


    Credit Hours: 2

    A course designed for ophthalmic assistants. Topics include ophthalmic medical history taking and guidelines, screening and emergency procedures, pre-testing and surgical procedures, and ophthalmic instrumentation.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate knowledge of and ability to take a relevant, concise ophthalmic history;
    • identify basic anatomy and physiology of the eye;
    • demonstrate knowledge of the basic concept of the field of vision and instrument use;
    • demonstrate knowledge of ophthalmic ointments and understand the advantages and disadvantages of each;
    • demonstrate knowledge of and instrument use;
    • distinguish between objective and subjective autorefraction;
    • demonstrate basic knowledge of and ability to perform color vision test and use of Amsler grid;
    • identify basic ophthalmic emergencies and procedures;
    • demonstrate basic knowledge of microbial control, sanitation, disinfection, sterilization and contamination;
    • identify basic ophthalmic instrumentation and their uses, and perform basic maintenance; and
    • demonstrate knowledge of HIPAA and how it influences policy, procedure and duties in the ophthalmic health care setting.

     

    F (N)

  
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    VC 141 - Assisting and Refraction Lab


    Credit Hours: 2

    This laboratory course provides practical application of knowledge acquired in VC 140.  Students build proficiency in the operation of ophthalmic assisting and pre-testing instrumentation.  Hands-on training includes tonometry, visual field testing, retinal photography, auto lensometry and automated refraction.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • capture, save and retrieve high resolution digital retinal images utilizing the fundus camera;
    • measure and record intraocular pressure with use of a non-contact tonometer;
    • determine refractive error with automated refraction testing utilizing simultaneous cross cylinders;
    • conduct auto lensometry; and
    • perform standard white/white kinetic perimetry using an automated visual field system.


    Prerequisites: VC 140
    S (N)

  
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    VC 142 - Contact Lenses I


    Credit Hours: 2

    Special emphasis will be given to designing both soft and gas permeable lens designs. Prescriptions and corneal measurements will be interpreted to determine the appropriate contact lens. It is a continuation of the use of all instruments vital in the fitting of contact lenses. Over-refraction procedures will be included.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • determine the proper type and prescription for soft contact lenses;
    • discuss the aspects of fitting rigid and soft contact lenses and the follow-up care;
    • know the indications and contraindications to contact lens wear;
    • design spherical rigid lenses; and
    • identify different types of edema.

     

    Prerequisites: VC 133
    Concurrent Registration: VC 143
    S (N)

  
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    VC 143 - Lab for VC 142


    Credit Hours: 2

    Introduction to the instruments used in contact lens fitting, with special attention given to the keratometer, topographer and biomicroscope. Use of the radiuscope, diameter gauge, and magnifier will be presented. Fitting of contact lenses with an emphasis on soft lenses.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate the usage of instruments needed in the fitting of contact lenses;
    • discuss the aspects of fitting rigid and soft lenses and the follow-up care;
    • express the terminology of contact lens fitting;
    • fit soft contact lenses;
    • evaluate corneal topography;
    • insert and remove soft contact lenses;
    • obtain a contact lens history;
    • verify contact lens parameters; and
    • perform a visual acuity check.

     

    Prerequisites: VC 133
    Concurrent Registration: VC 142
    S (N)

  
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    VC 150 - Ophthalmic Dispensing II


    Credit Hours: 3

    Introduction to prism in the ophthalmic lens including decentration, deviation, types and uses. Single vision and multifocal prescription analysis including the application of bifocals, trifocals, progressive and vocational lenses. The availability and use of conventional and specialty ophthalmic frames.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • distinguish between different frame construction and materials;
    • identify frame components, frame mounting systems and their applications;
    • determine uses of specialty frame products including sport/safety and other specialty frame designs;
    • define boxing system terminology and frame and lens measurements including application;
    • calculate lens decentration and minimum blank size as it correlates to the boxing system;
    • apply formulas used in spherical and cylinder lenses;
    • perform prescription transposition, optical cross, nominal power and lens curvature formulas;
    • perform an analysis of ophthalmic prisms which will include descriptions of prisms, classification of prismatic effects and measurements, splitting, and combining of ophthalmic prisms;
    • the proper use of Prentice's Rule in decentering single vision lenses to create prism; and
    • identify the proper functions of multifocal lenses including lens decentration/inset and proper segment placement.


    Prerequisites: VC 100 or permission of the instructor.
    S (N)

  
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    VC 160 - Ophthalmic Lenses II


    Credit Hours: 3

    A study of multifocal design and construction. In depth evaluation of all multifocals, including bifocals, trifocals, occupational, blended and progressive lenses. Discussions of lens tints, colors, coatings, filtering and sports lenses. Formulas applicable to lens functions are included. Current lens catalogs and websites are utilized for information and data.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • identify and record the information necessary to duplicate lenses covered in class;
    • apply formulas that relate to functions of spectacle lenses;
    • measure and apply appropriate formula to determine proper base curve of a given lens;
    • conduct analysis of varying lens product enhancements of all ophthalmic lens materials;
    • identify and describe various single vision, multifocal and specialty lens forms;
    • distinguish and describe various lens tints and their appropriate uses; and
    • describe different lens aberrations and proper methods for limiting their unwanted characteristics.

     

    Prerequisites: VC 110
    S (N)

  
  •  

    VC 232 - Contact Lenses II


    Credit Hours: 1.5

    Continuation of VC 142. Special emphasis will be given to special lens designs including bifocals, soft toric, keratoconus and therapeutic lenses. Continuation of the use of all instruments vital in the fitting of all contact lenses. Over-refraction procedures will be included.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • fit all makes of contact lenses;
    • discuss the aspects of fitting rigid and soft lenses and the follow up care;
    • express the terminology of contact lens fitting;
    • assess how to fit special lenses; and
    • participate in National Contact Lens Certification Examination and the New York State Contact Lens Licensing Examination.

     

    Prerequisites: VC 142
    Concurrent Registration: VC 233
    F (N)

  
  •  

    VC 233 - Lab for VC 232


    Credit Hours: 2

    This course is a continuation in the use of all instruments vital in the fitting of contact lenses. Emphasis will be given to special lens designs, including bifocals, toric, keratoconus and therapeutic lenses. Over-refraction procedures will be included.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate the usage of instruments needed in the fitting of contact lenses;
    • discuss the aspects of fitting rigid and soft lenses and the follow-up care;
    • express the terminology of contact lens fitting;
    • assess how to fit special lenses;
    • evaluate fluorescein patterns; and
    • participate in the National Contact Lens Certification Examination and the New York State Contact Lens Licensing Examination.

     

    Prerequisites: VC 142
    Concurrent Registration: VC 232
    F (N)

  
  •  

    VC 240 - Ophthalmic Dispensing III


    Credit Hours: 3

    Instruction includes preparation for American Board of Opticianry National Certification Examination. This course includes the study of presbyopia, accommodation, convergence, segment size and add power determination. Additional topics include vertical imbalance and methods of its correction, progressive lenses, technological advancements, fitting and problem solving, absorptive lenses and the use of specialty lens coatings.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
     

    • determine the effects of presbyopia and select appropriate lens for its correction;
    • evaluate difference lens styles;
    • compare and contrast the multitude of lens styles available;
    • manipulate patients prescription to meet differing visual requirements;
    • distinguish proper segment placement of varying multifocal styles;
    • identify anisometropic prescriptions leading to vertical imbalance;
    • determine proper method for the correction of vertical imbalance;
    • conduct use of proper formulas for calculating vertical imbalance;
    • identify the concept and early design of progressive addition lenses;
    • analyze the current technology used in the creation of modern progressive lenses;
    • identify the proper methods used in the fitting and dispensing of progressive lenses;
    • determine design characteristics and proper uses of specialty progressive lenses;
    • evaluate effect of digital surfacing principles with evolving progressive lens design;
    • distinguish between the different forms of glare and proper lens selection for their management;
    • identify differing forms of radiant energy and its effect on the eye;
    • identify differing absorptive lenses and their appropriate uses; and
    • evaluate the effects of different lens coatings on ophthalmic lens surfaces including scratch resistant, anti-reflective and mirror.


    Prerequisites: VC 150, VC 160
    F (N)

  
  •  

    VC 243 - Contact Lens Clinic Practice


    Credit Hours: 1

    The actual fitting of a contact lens patient including pre-fitting, evaluation, delivery and the follow-up care.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate the usage of instruments needed in the fitting of contact lenses;
    • discuss the aspects of fitting rigid and soft lenses and the follow-up care;
    • take a contact lens history;
    • educate patients in the proper insertion, removal and care of contact lenses;
    • evaluate the fit of soft contact lenses;
    • communicate effectively with patients; and
    • participate in the National Contact Lens Certification Examination and the New York State Contact Lens Licensing Examination.


    Prerequisites: VC 142, VC 143
    S (N)

  
  •  

    VC 245 - Ophthalmic Fabrication I


    Credit Hours: 2

    An orientation to laboratory facilities required to produce single vision and multifocal finished eyewear including an introduction to prism.  Instruction will include laboratory safety, lensometer usage, boxing system, tool usage, lens layout, prescription fabrication, bench alignment and frame repair.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate the proper use of lensometer;
    • perform neutralization of spherical and cylindrical lenses;
    • demonstrate proper techniques of hand beveling ophthalmic lenses;
    • identify and properly use common ophthalmic hand tools and measuring devices;
    • develop proper bench alignment skills;
    • perform basic ophthalmic frame repair;
    • demonstrate proper layout of single vision and multifocal lenses;
    • learn and complete job work ticket;
    • edge, assemble and verify completed single vision and multifocal eyewear; and
    • demonstrate application of ANSI standards.

     

    F (N)

  
  •  

    VC 246 - Ophthalmic Dispensing Lab I


    Credit Hours: 3

    This ophthalmic dispensing laboratory provides students with the practical application of lensometers and devices for measuring pupillary distances; recording the spectacle order and use of ophthalmic tools in adjusting eyewear. Basic dispensing prescriptions include single vision, multifocal, prism, and anisometropic prescription analysis. Clinical practice adjusting and performing eyeglass repairs.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate lens neutralization techniques;
    • analyze single vision and multifocal prescriptions;
    • interpret prescription ordering terminology;
    • develop effective ophthalmic record keeping;
    • demonstrate visual axis measurement theory;
    • apply dispensing procedure theory;
    • dispense basic plastic and metal eyewear;
    • perform basic facial measurements;
    • utilize all required hand tools for frame adjustments;
    • employ standard order form; and
    • interact courteously and calmly with student/patient.


    Concurrent Registration: VC 240
    F (N)

  
  •  

    VC 250 - Ophthalmic Dispensing IV


    Credit Hours: 2

    Instruction will include, but is not limited to, the continuation of general opticianry practice with special emphasis on aphakic vision problems, analysis of complex and unusual vision prescriptions. Topics will also include common eye diseases and disorders, refractive surgical techniques and low vision devices.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • distinguish between the multiple tests done in the preliminary eye examination;
    • identify microbes which cause eye infections, ocular conditions and anatomy affected by the particular microbe and methods of reducing their spread in eye practices;
    • distinguish between different ocular pharmacology agents and the application methods of these agents;
    • identify cataract terminology, formation and surgical techniques used for the removal of cataracts;
    • conduct an analysis of the different methods of aphakic correction including spectacles, contact lenses and intraocular lens implants;
    • evaluate refractive surgical techniques with emphasis on most current technology and special challenges and concerns in fitting post refractive surgical patients with contact lenses and spectacles;
    • identify the most common eye diseases and their treatments including macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy along with test and treatment of these diseases;
    • develop proper techniques for identifying and correcting complex and unusual vision prescriptions including aniseikonic, high minus and high plus; and
    • apply knowledge of low vision problems to determine appropriate device for its management.


    Prerequisites: VC 240
    S (N)

  
  •  

    VC 255 - Ophthalmic Fabrication II


    Credit Hours: 1

    Fabrication of complex prescriptions including prism and progressive multifocal lenses with varied frame and lens materials. Application of various lens treatments and completion of complex frame repairs.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • fabricate and evaluate bifocal and progressive multifocal lenses;
    • demonstrate ability to tint and polish spectacle lenses;
    • demonstrate ability to work with different ophthalmic frame materials;
    • create prism in finished vision eyewear;
    • repair hidden hinges in zyl frames;
    • demonstrate ability to solder frames;
    • repair frames with broken eye wire and temple screws;
    • groove and insert lenses into nylon rimless frame; and
    • demonstrate application of ANSI standards.


    Prerequisites: VC 245
    S (N)

  
  •  

    VC 256 - Ophthalmic Dispensing Lab II


    Credit Hours: 3

    This laboratory is a continuation of clinical practice in the dispensing of all types of spectacles. Analysis of complex and unusual prescriptions and the dispensing procedures in these cases. Instructions in fitting special types of spectacles, including cataract, bicentric, monocular, vocational, avocational, sports and safety, subnormal vision aids and others. Frame analysis to meet patients' needs as related to intended use and current trends. Vertex distance measurements and prescription compensation procedures will be taught.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    • dispense all plastic, combination, rimless and metal eyewear;
    • analyze and interpret special and extraordinary prescriptions, including presbyopic, cataract, prism, and high powers;
    • perform dispensing skills;
    • identify and apply components of a electronic based recording and ordering systems; and
    • perform the various requirements needed in off-campus clinic operations and replicated dispensing scenarios.


    Prerequisites: VC 246
    Concurrent Registration: VC 261
    S (N)

  
  •  

    VC 261 - General Dispensing Practice


    Credit Hours: 1

    A course in agency observation, study and participation, aimed at orienting the student optician to a specific field work assignment with emphasis on supervised participation in the work of the ophthalmic dispensing agency. In addition to observing, reporting and recording, there is a practical application of minor and major ophthalmic dispensing skills in an actual ophthalmic dispensing (out-clinic) setting.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • complete minor repairs to customers eyewear;
    • readjust eyewear to customers satisfaction in a normal period of time;
    • interact courteously with co-workers and customers alike;
    • apply skills learned in Ophthalmic Dispensing Lab to situations encountered in actual business practice;
    • suggest appropriate eyewear to the public regarding frame compatibility with the customer prescription;
    • describe benefits accruable to the customer based on frames, size, color, type, and/or material;
    • take all required facial and anatomical measurements to correctly fabricate the customer's prescription;
    • deliver the completed eyewear to the customer, making all necessary adjustments beyond the basic bench adjustment, including directions to the customer on proper handling, maintenance and pitfalls concerning adjustment to the new optical power of the lenses and prescription;
    • document and place order, transmit specifications and record appropriate laboratory information;
    • maintain price and product lists by monitoring price and product availability;
    • determine patient's participation in a third party program and complete appropriate documentation; and
    • establish rapport with patient and demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.


    Prerequisites: VC 246
    Concurrent Registration: VC 256
    S (N)

  
  •  

    VC 264 - Ophthalmic Practice Management


    Credit Hours: 2

    Presentation and discussion of basic procedures applied in present-day ophthalmic dispensing practices. Major emphasis is on communicating with patients, positioning in the profession and management techniques.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • describe the skills and licensure requirements necessary to obtain an entry level position as a dispensing optician;
    • utilize successful communications skill with patients including special needs strategies;
    • address the needs of a culturally diverse patient base;
    • demonstrate application of HIPAA regulations as they pertain to patients in the ophthalmic practice;
    • contrast present day marketing strategies of various dispensing practices adopting or rejecting favorable position;
    • calculate markup procedures for a dispensing practice;
    • evaluate capture rate and chair cost as critical benchmarks for practice; and
    • prepare and present a research report stating support or opposition of a practice management topic.


    S (N)

  
  •  

    VC 283 - Advanced Contact Lens Lab


    Credit Hours: 2

    Practical applications of contact lens course. Topics include fitting of contact lenses, over-refraction of contact lenses, RGP lens fitting, office management and problem solving techniques.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate the usage of instruments needed in the fitting of contact lenses;
    • discuss the aspects of fitting rigid and soft lenses and the follow-up care;
    • express the terminology of contact lens fitting;
    • fit rigid and soft contact lenses;
    • assess how to fit special lenses;
    • understand the management of a contact lens practice;
    • design contact lenses; and
    • participate in the National Contact Lens Certification Examination and the New York State Contact Lens Licensing Examination.


    Prerequisites: VC 232, VC 233
    S (N)


Visual Communication Technology-Graphic Arts/Printing

  
  •  

    GA 101 - Orientation to Graphics


    Credit Hours: 2

    For those thinking about a career in graphic design, this course provides the student with basic skills and concepts. Emphasis on the history, terminology and sequencing used in the production of traditional printed information. Students will be given hands-on projects that reinforce the importance of typography, the principles and elements of design and layout as well as the graphics measuring systems.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • identify basic terminology used in the printing industry;
    • recognize major individuals and dates in history who contributed to the invention of the printing process;
    • identify various products such as advertising/ads, posters, calendars, brochures, newsletters, books, product labels & packaging, music industry products, postcards, etc. as viable products for printing; their varied uses and appearances;
    • recognize products from the past that are examples of fine communication/printing craftsmanship and beauty;
    • understand the basic process used to produce a product in the printing industry as well as identify basic equipment;
    • measure in points and picas, compare and convert point and picas to other measurement systems;
    • understand, be able to decipher and apply mark-up codes to rough copy;
    • identify the fundamentals of typography;
    • identify basic components and principles of good layout and design;
    • identify the differences between thumbnails, roughs, comprehensives and how to render a basic rough;
    • correctly measure and mark-up specified projects using points and picas; and
    • be able to utilize a sketch/note book as a means for collecting and organizing related ideas, data, information, etc. as part of the process involved in designing products for printing.


    F (S)

  
  •  

    GA 102 - Publishing I Basics


    Credit Hours: 2

    This course includes an introduction to the operation and components of a Macintosh computer, desktop management, and an introductory overview of fonts, color, and file formats as they relate to page assembly. Preparation of layouts and proofs with text and graphics generated by various page assembly programs.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • navigate through the operation system of the Apple computer;
    • proficiently use various Apple software tools;
    • describe the importance of page layout programs in the graphic arts industry, as well as identify different types of software programs;
    • apply design principles and typography in a pleasing layout;
    • understand the steps in the creative process and utilize them during class;
    • utilize the page layout software application; and
    • use hardware in conjunction with class requirements.


    F (S)

  
  •  

    GA 103 - Electronic Imaging I


    Credit Hours: 2

    A basic course in pre-press activities. Students will use a computer application to create simple digital documents. Printer control marks, color bars, text marks, crop marks and fold marks will be explained as well as how to output documents in PDF format. Different styles of print layouts for single and multiple impositions will be discussed and used. An imposition application will be used for the basics of how to output files to wide format proof printers.  

    Course Outcomes
    At the end of the course, the student will be able to:

    • recognize standard graphic formats, color spaces and documents;
    • produce and convert basic graphic documents into a PDF workflow;
    • solve imposition calculations for page creep, ganging and step and repeat;
    • modify quality control devices and marks relevant to specific outputs;
    • classify Imposition layouts for books and flat sheet layouts;
    • apply Impositions to specific binding and Workstyles utilizing a digital workflow; and
    • modify output device dependent settings to achieve predictable results.


    F (S)

  
  •  

    GA 105 - Lithographic Press I


    Credit Hours: 2.5

    Introduction to the background, components and principles of offset lithography and hands-on operation of various duplicator presses, plate-making, paper handling, ink and basic bindery/finishing methods. Included will be instruction in safety, maintenance, make ready, production and quality control. The course objective is to produce well-printed, single- and multi-colored jobs for inclusion in a portfolio.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • explain the operations required to produce a printed product;
    • explain the role of the graphic arts technician and their relationship with the members of the print production team;
    • demonstrate the ability to operate and maintain a variety of printing/bindery equipment;
    • present ideas verbally, demonstrating craftsmanship and confidence in a commercial print shop environment;
    • demonstrate safe working habits and practices in an industrial environment;
    • demonstrate proper material handling abilities; and
    • demonstrate increased verbal and visual communication skills in presenting one's ability to apply standard practices in a printing production environment.


    F (S)

  
  •  

    GA 121 - Publishing With InDesign™


    Credit Hours: 2

    A comprehensive overview of the theory and operation of InDesign as a page assembly and layout program for print media. Students will produce work utilizing features of the software that are essential to the production of high end print work including but not limited to color, masterpages, styles, folds and PDFs. The various lab projects will emphasize the basic design principles for portfolio.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • proficiently use the InDesign software;
    • understand and describe the importance of page layout programs in the graphic arts industry to produce high end products for printing;
    • describe the impact of printing variables (ex: paper, ink, color, etc.) on the production process and your designs;
    • apply design principles, color and typography in a pleasing layout;
    • use hardware in conjunction with the class requirements; and
    • describe the steps in the creative process, and utilize them during the lab sessions to produce both hard and soft proofs for proofreading, presentation and publication.


    S (S)

  
  •  

    GA 122 - Electronic Imaging II


    Credit Hours: 2

    A more advanced course in pre-press activities that reflects changes in the printing industry with hands-on laboratory projects that include digital image capture and the use of an imposition application to create signatures in a variety of styles. Students will learn to imposition print jobs with multiple images like post cards, menus and multiple page signatures.

    Course Outcomes
    At the end of the course the student will be able to:
     

    • learn about how job tickets provide checklists of general information for use by both prepress and press, and bindery departments;
    • plan and create an imposition that will be saddle stitched;
    • learn about how to plan for proper clamp and gripper allowances;
    • learn about the importance of printing controls like crop marks, registration marks, and color bars and how to create each in an imposition software application;
    • send digital files for output to a wide format printer;
    • create a two color step and repeat imposition;
    • plan an imposition based on a work and turn layout style;
    • create an imposition that will be printed on two sides of a press sheet;
    • study sequential page order for various types of signatures;
    • send digital files to output computer to plate;
    • learn why computer application software continues to replace the traditional imposition (stripping) methods for plate making; and
    • learn how unwanted patterns (moiré) are created in printing and how to avoid and correct them.


    Prerequisites: GA 103
    S (S)

  
  •  

    GA 124 - Lithographic Press II


    Credit Hours: 2.5

    A continuation of the theory of operating lithographic sheet-fed presses including make ready, feeder and delivery procedures. Concepts of plate and blanket handling, PH factors, dampening/ink systems, registration, paper considerations and press problem-solving for quality control and safety will be covered.

    Hands-on advanced procedures in operating duplicator presses will include multi-colored registration, PH measuring, ink mixing, finishing, press and paper problem solving, as well as plate developing and troubleshooting. The course objective is to produce well-registered, multi-colored jobs for inclusion in a portfolio.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • explain the operations required to produce a printed product;
    • explain the role of the graphic arts technician and their relationship with the members of the print production team;
    • demonstrate the ability to operate and maintain a variety of printing/bindery equipment;
    • present ideas verbally, demonstrating craftsmanship and confidence in a commercial print shop environment;
    • demonstrate safe working habits and practices in an industrial environment;
    • demonstrate proper material handling abilities; and
    • demonstrate increased verbal and visual communication skills in presenting one's ability to apply standard practices in a printing production environment.


    Prerequisites: GA 105
    S (S)

  
  •  

    GA 125 - Create With Illustrator®


    Credit Hours: 2.5

    The definition and creation of object-oriented vector graphics will be the focus of this course as well as the exploration of the role of an illustrator. Students will learn how to master basic techniques of creating an original piece of digital art in Adobe Illustrator. Studies in advertising along with the integration of creative copy, the use of typography and creative problem solving will be emphasized. The course objective is to have students develop a variety of multi-colored visual projects that emphasize creativity and problem solving for inclusion in a portfolio.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate the principles of layout and graphic design as applied to commercial printing;
    • explain the role of art director and the relationship with the customer and other members of the print production team;
    • explain the history illustration in advertising, demonstrate several styles and its use in an advertising campaign;
    • present ideas visually, demonstrating craftsmanship and confidence in a simulated commercial print job environment;
    • learn to use the elements of design to create object-oriented vector graphics as part of a dynamic and compelling layout;
    • use the basic techniques in creating graphics with Adobe Illustrator on the Macintosh computer; and
    • demonstrate industry standard skills in preparing one's own work for a professional portfolio.


    S (S)

  
  •  

    GA 126 - Visual Design Basics


    Credit Hours: 2.5

    Introductory course to the principles of graphic design and its relationship to typography and layout for digital and print media. Basic concepts involved in developing packaging designs from concept to presentation, historical trends and effects on design, the role of the art director, customer and production team, paper requirements and the relationship the job must have to the production process. The course objective is to have students develop a variety of visual design projects using computer software, creativity and problem solving for inclusion in a portfolio.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate the principles of layout and graphic design as applied to commercial printing;
    • explain the role of graphic designer, graphic technician and the relationship with the customer and other members of the print production team;
    • explain the history of graphic design of the 20th century to present day trends. Be conversant in several styles and recognize their effect on advertising and the print media today;
    • present ideas visually, demonstrating craftsmanship and confidence in a simulated commercial print job environment;
    • create object-oriented vector graphics as part of a dynamic and compelling layout;
    • create a basic 3-dimensional digital mechanical and mockup for a client presentation; and
    • demonstrate increased verbal and visual communication skills in presenting one's own work through preparation and presentation of a portfolio.


    Prerequisites: GA 125
    S (S)

  
  •  

    GA 131 - Photoshop I®


    Credit Hours: 2

    This course introduces the student to the basics of Photoshop using a MacIntosh computer.  The Photoshop menu and sub-menu will be explored along with various interactive panels.  Students will gain practical knowledge from hands-on laboratory projects.

    Course Outcomes
    At the end of the course the student will be able to:

    • output color proofs of images that have gone through basic image editing;
    • apply special effects with filters;
    • have knowledge of working with PhotoShop selection tools like the rectangular and elliptical marquee tools;
    • select an image with the magic wand;
    • use the lasso tool to select areas to be modified;
    • organize artwork on layers;
    • select and remove artwork on a layer;
    • add a gradient to a layer effect;
    • work with masks and channels;
    • photo retouching, resolution and image size, adjust tonal range;
    • use pen tool techniques and drawing paths around artwork; and
    • know the basics of file formats.


    F (S)

  
  •  

    GA 133 - Lithographic Press III


    Credit Hours: 2

    Advanced hands-on operation of a sheet-fed press and bindery systems. Procedures and techniques including use of a micrometer, blanket handling and packing, roller settings, adjustments, registering, specific press problems, and troubleshooting will be covered. Also included will be color principals, densitometry, and color bars, as well as a variety of imposition methods. The course objective is to provide experience in the set-up, make ready, registration, and production of a variety of single color, duo-tone, and multicolored jobs on the press including folder operations.

    Course Outcomes
    After completion of this course, the student will have acquired the skills to:

    • identify basic terminology utilized within the graphic arts industry;
    • recognize the various processes used to produce a project and the equipment utilized in the process;
    • identify the proper maintenance procedures relating to a variety of printing and bindery machinery;
    • recognize the need to follow safety procedures including chemical and mechanical hazard identification;
    • employ measuring techniques in a variety of formats;
    • develop procedures to follow in verifying position and register on a variety of printing and bindery equipment;
    • gain competency in properly setting up a variety of printing and bindery equipment;
    • recognize the importance of properly imposing images for the production on printing and bindery machinery; and
    • develop the skills required to safely handle materials in the print shop.


    Prerequisites: GA 124
    F (S)

  
  •  

    GA 134 - Print Administration/Quality Control


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course introduces students to the fundamental skills needed to supervise, manage and control the printing process. Emphasis will be placed on overall administrative functions from production management, estimating, to quality control.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to:

    • describe seven functions of management;
    • identify the unique factors of the printing industry as both a service and manufacturing industry;
    • identify the different components of printed product, determine what method(s) produced them, and understand how a product is estimated and priced in the printing industry;
    • recognize different methods to control production efficiency; and
    • describe various quality control methods used in the printing Industry.


    F (S)

  
  •  

    GA 135 - Digital and Variable Data Printing


    Credit Hours: 1

    An overview of digital and variable data printing as it relates to direct marketing and digital printing. This course will concentrate on basic relational database design, mailing list development and merging of static document elements with variable elements developed from database management software. The focus of this will give the student insight into the product mix and capabilities as they relate to transactional, promotional and transpromotional materials.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • identify basic advertising and marketing concepts;
    • interpret database development, manipulation and preparation for VDP;
    • define the production stages in variable data publishing;
    • define the system components in a variable data print and publish workflow;
    • define the levels of VDP; and
    • develop, digitally create and print personalized products by merging static document elements from a page layout template and variable document elements imported from a database.


    Prerequisites: GA 121
    F (S)

  
  •  

    GA 140 - Publishing IV Web Basics


    Credit Hours: 3

    Introduction to the basics of HTML coding as well as the basics of constructing an identity package with a repeating logo in both linear and web formats will be covered. The creation of basic web pages using HTML, linear forms design, a written resume, identity package components and a personal portfolio as part of the identity package for inclusion in a portfolio will be the course objective.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • identify the basics and background of the www; identify the basics of HTML as a coding technique for construction of web pages and the basic do's and don'ts of good web design;
    • identify basic codes, software and equipment necessary to construct a document in HTML format on the internet;
    • construct a basic home page using a range of HTML codes from formatting, to color, to links, etc. for the web and a personal home page that includes advanced coding techniques that tie in with an identity package;
    • understand basics of good logo design and the application to varied sizes within identity package components;
    • identify "forms design" as the umbrella concept for creating a range of industry identity products including: the five basic functions of forms a planning check list for constructing effective and clear forms;
    • identify and provide background for various components that make up an identity package for an individual or corporation: letterheads, business cards, envelopes, memo forms, purchase orders, shipping labels, invoices, compliment and packing slips, inventory sheets, employee record forms, cost/sales reports, expense vouchers, policy statements, news releases, personal portfolio, resume, etc.;
    • construct specific components for an identity package in linear format using either QuarkXPress, InDesign or another suitable page assembly program;
    • identify and use proper paper stock for specific id package components: writing/text, cover, NCR papers, etc.;
    • calculate the most efficient multiple imposition for producing smaller items on a larger sheet size;
    • select and correctly input data for using the step and repeat function for multiple imposition; and
    • identify the basic components of book construction and construct several book page components for inclusion in a personal portfolio in binder format that is part of the identity package.


    Prerequisites: GA 121; GA 125 or GA 131
    S (S)

  
  •  

    GA 141 - Photoshop II®


    Credit Hours: 2

    A more advanced introduction to Photoshop using color panels, histograms, levels, curves and working with camera raw images. The use of tools including cloning, healing tools, sharpness, blur, noise adjustments filters, image masks, drop shadows and other special effects that include 3D objects will be covered using hand-on laboratory projects.

    Course Outcomes
    At the end of the course the student will be able to:
     

    • make a composition (surrealistic) with a number of digital camera images that have been cropped, color corrected, any imperfections removed, etc. to create an artful composition;
    • make vector shapes and use clipping paths;
    • use layer effects and create floating selections;
    • use clipping groups;
    • create animation and make key frames in ImageReady;
    • learn about slices and rollovers;
    • make corrections with the history brush and history palette;
    • create custom brushes and settings that appear in the tool options bar;
    • use actions and styles to re-create a vector graphic;
    • create layer sets to organize and manage layers;
    • use channels to create selections; and
    • adjust the tonal range of an image by assigning black and white points.


    Prerequisites: GA 131
    S (S)

  
  •  

    GA 143 - Internship


    Credit Hours: 3

    The internship experience is designed to provide realistic hands-on training to students in some or all the techniques utilized in the areas of pre-press, press, digital output and/or bindery operations as they relate to the printing industry.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to:
     

    • identify good interview techniques, dress attire, and preparations to interview for various industry related positions;
    • participate in an interview/hiring process for acceptance into an internship position;
    • relate classroom instruction and training to an assigned on-the-job experience;
    • apply specific learned skills and techniques to perform effectively in the industry work environment;
    • demonstrate ability to utilize critical thinking skills for problem solving on-the-job;
    • communicate effectively with supervisors and workplace personnel;
    • evaluate related work experience and performance in a positive manner;
    • apply valuable experience to future decision making and career choices; and
    • apply specific skills and experience to enhance future resume preparation.


    Prerequisites: GA 133
    S (S)

  
  •  

    GA 144 - Multimedia


    Credit Hours: 2

    An overview of the history and principals of multimedia. Creation of interactive presentations utilizing contemporary industry software, incorporating animation, sound, still and moving images. The integration and exploration of interactive design will be discussed. Internet competencies will be tested. Knowledge of Photoshop and Illustrator recommended.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    • utilize multimedia software to create animations;
    • utilize multimedia software to create an interface;
    • understand multimedia history, terminology and definitions;
    • utilize multimedia facts, tips, and tricks;
    • compare and contrast websites;
    • understand and utilize interactivity; and
    • identify and utilize multimedia elements in web design.


    S (S)

  
  •  

    GA 145 - Web Page Design with Dreamweaver


    Credit Hours: 3

    The theory and hands-on operation of Web design including basic and advanced functions will be covered using Adobe Dreamweaver. The concepts of Web page design, utilizing interactivity, and information organization as they relate to constructing effective Web pages. The course objective will be to design and execute a multi-page Web site utilizing Adobe Dreamweaver.

    Course Outcomes
    At the end of the course the student will be able to:
     

    • utilize HTML, compare and contrast DHTML, and Java Script;
    • utilize Adobe Dreamweaver to create a working web page;
    • understand Web terminology and definitions;
    • utilize web facts, tips, and tricks;
    • compare and contrast Web sites, providers and servers;
    • understand and utilize interactivity;
    • promote a personal website for "hits"; and
    • identify and utilize multimedia elements in web design.

     

    F/S (S)

  
  •  

    GA 146 - Intro to 3D Modeling and Animation


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course focuses on the basics of 3D computer graphics and animation. Students are introduced to the major functional areas of the 3D modeling and animation software including the interface and philosophy, conceptual planning, scene creation, 3D modeling, materials and texturing, character rigging and animation, lighting and rendering. Organized into a series of theory and hands on lab assignments that cover the application of these tools in multimedia, film, television and game industries, the course ensures that the student will receive a full overview and professional training. 

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate knowledge of animation software and utilize the user interface;
    • define and describe basic animation techniques;
    • analyze, plan and construct objects;
    • analyze and arrange the movement of objects;
    • analyze, plan and construct realistic backgrounds and scenes;
    • develop and create characters;
    • plan and execute a path for animation; and
    • demonstrate the ability to animate objects with moving parts.

     

    F/S (S)

  
  •  

    GA 231 - Prepress Fundamentals


    Credit Hours: 2.0

    A basic course in pre-press activities. Students will use a computer application to create simple digital documents. Printer control marks, color bars, text marks, crop marks and fold marks will be explained as well as how to output documents in PDF format. Different styles of print layouts for single and multiple impositions will be discussed and used. An imposition application will be used for the basics of how to output files to wide format proof printers.  

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • recognize standard Graphic Formats, Color Spaces and Documents;
    • produce and convert basic graphic documents into a pdf workflow;
    • solve imposition calculations for page creep, ganging and step and repeat;
    • modify quality control devices and marks relevant to specific outputs;
    • classify imposition layouts for books and flat sheet layouts;
    • apply impositions to specific binding and workstyles utilizing a digital workflow; and
    • modify Output Device dependent settings to achieve predictable results.


    F (S)

  
  •  

    GA 232 - Digital Imaging I


    Credit Hours: 2.5

    Students will work on preparing digital files for single-and two-color text and graphics jobs for output to computer-to-plate equipment. Topics include the basic concepts of trapping, spot color issues, duotone images, and preflighting of spot color files. The pagination, and proofing of a multiple page signature in spot color as well as its potential output to computer-to-plate equipment will be the course objective.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • prepare a two-color page layout document correctly for output to a postscript level output device;
    • prepare and output digital halftone images;
    • understand and perform basic electronic trapping techniques for simple multicolor page layouts;
    • prepare and output electronic documents utilizing correct screen ruling, resolution and screen angles for a postscript level output device;
    • prepare and output digital grayscale images as duotones;
    • preflight spot color files for postscript output; and
    • demonstrate the learned techniques and their accuracy utilizing proofs and computer to plate output.


    F (S)

  
  •  

    GA 241 - Digital Imposition & Workflow


    Credit Hours: 2.0

    A more advanced course in pre-press activities that reflects changes in the printing industry with hands-on laboratory projects that include digital image capture and the use of an imposition application to create signatures in a variety of styles. Students will learn to imposition print jobs with multiple images like post cards, menus and multiple page signatures.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • recognize and construct standard Graphic Documents in properly formatted Color Spaces;
    • produce, modify and convert basic graphic documents into a PDF workflow;
    • solve Imposition calculations for Page Creep, Ganging and Step and Repeat;
    • modify and Construct Quality control devices and Marks relevant to specific outputs;
    • classify Imposition Layouts for Books and Flat Sheet Layouts;
    • prepare proper formatted imposition templates in page layout and imposition program;
    • construct organized file tree maintaining links and the correct file version for output;
    • modify Output Device dependent PDF settings to achieve predictable results; and
    • demonstrate the ability to digitally capture scanned images properly sized and formatted for placement in a page layout document.


    S (S)

  
  •  

    GA 242 - Digital Imaging II


    Credit Hours: 2.5

    Advanced procedures for creating digital files for output. Color theory and correction as it pertains to color separation including the additive and subtractive systems, under color removal and grey component replacement. The pagination, preflight and proofing of a multiple page signature in color as well as its potential output to a platesetter will be the course objective.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • understand the basics of both additive and subtractive color;
    • understand the processes of color correction and color separation, and their relation to quality of print production;
    • receive an introduction to the color separation techniques of gray component replacement (GCR) and under color removal (UCR);
    • scan and prepare color images correctly for postscript output; and
    • output 4 color process plates to a platesetter and perform basic quality control, such as checking line screens, angles, ink density and overall plates quality.


    S (S)

 

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