Jan 24, 2021  
Spring 2019 Catalog 
    
Spring 2019 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 Key to Course Descriptions

 Course Description

Abbreviations
 

(C) City Campus F/S Fall and Spring
(N) North Campus SS Summer Session
(S) South Campus F+ Offered every other Fall
F Fall S+ Offered every other Spring
S Spring N Non-Credit

 

Course Outlines

Course outlines for all courses described in this catalog are available for viewing. To explore the general framework of a course design and view the expectations of student performance within a select course click on the link below. These descriptions provide the base upon which instructors build their own course syllabi for the individual sections offered by the academic departments. Individual sections may therefore vary somewhat from the descriptions given in the outlines.

Course Outlines

 

Culinary Arts

  
  •  

    HC 250 - Catering and Special Events


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of creating and planning a successful event. Emphasis will be on establishing the customer's goal, budget planning, food and drink, entertainment and the risk and safety factors involved in creating an event.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate understanding in the use of sales techniques;
    • present a wide range of event plans and their budgets; and
    • acquire discernment in the establishment of the customer's goals in having the event.


    S (C,N)


Dance

  
  •  

    DN 101 - Introduction to Dance


    Credit Hours: 3

    Designed for first-year students in dance, the course introduces the fundamental principles of modern movement involving basic dance and exercise. It covers the historical and aesthetic approach to dance as an art form.

    Fulfills SUNY General Education -- The Arts.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
     

    • demonstrate a command of dance terminology;
    • demonstrate knowledge of introductory level dance exercises;
    • apply rhythms, beats, and general movements to choreographed floor progressions;
    • choreograph and perform an original dance routine to music;
    • recognize his/her gain in self-awareness and confidence through mastering better control over his/her body actions/expressions; and
    • recognize an appreciation of dance both as art form and for personal enjoyment.


    F/S (C)

  
  •  

    DN 102 - Ballet I


    Credit Hours: 3

    A study of the theories and techniques of classical ballet. The historic vocabulary of ballet is taught. Designed for the beginning ballet student.

    Fulfills SUNY General Education -- The Arts.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate the five basic positions of ballet;
    • demonstrate ballet barre, across floor work, and center floor work;
    • memorize and perform ballet routines set to music;
    • choreograph an original ballet routine; and
    • demonstrate an understanding of simple ballet terminology.

     

    Cycles (S)

  
  •  

    DN 103 - Modern Jazz Dance I


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course continues the history and foundation of jazz dance, which is covered in DN101 (Introduction to Dance). It also covers the latest trends in jazz dance and terminology in which the concepts of jazz dance are taught. This involves specific phrases such as barre work, jazz barre, jazz stretches, walks, isolations, turns, jumps and combinations. The course also covers special rhythms and beats; general movements to choreographed floor progressions; and comparisons of modern jazz and rock technique.

    Fulfills SUNY General Education -- The Arts.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to dance for creativity and exercise for personal enjoyment.

    F/S (C)

  
  •  

    DN 107 - African American Dance I


    Credit Hours: 3

    The course will deal with the basic history of black involvement in dance. By utilizing the rhythms of the drums, folk music, jazz, rhythm and blues, the focus will be on African, jazz and modern movements that reflect the moods, characters and lifestyles of the African-American.

    Fulfills SUNY General Education -- The Arts.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • understand the historical, physical, and artistic significance of the African dance;
    • recognize traditional African dance as a form of communication and expression;
    • recognize the aspect of African dance that can be choreographed so that it can be performed in one or in a combination of three activity forms;
    • perform simple African dances in their entirety with decorum and pride;
    • recognize the value of cultural growth;
    • learn African rhythms though dancing and music; and
    • understand and use African dance terminology.


    Cycles (C)

  
  •  

    DN 108 - African American Dance II


    Credit Hours: 3

    Continuation of DN 107.

    Fulfills SUNY General Education -- The Arts.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
     

    • recognize the importance and meanings of the various kinds of African dances;
    • recognize that the African dance is a form of communication and expression;
    • recognize African dance as a cultural art form and the foundation of all dance;
    • perform two intermediate dances in their entirety with decorum and pride;
    • learn intermediate level African rhythms through dancing and music; and
    • understand and use an expanded vocabulary within the parameters of African dance.


    Cycles (C)

  
  •  

    DN 111 - Beginning Tap Dance


    Credit Hours: 3

    Designed for the first year student in tap dancing introducing the fundamental principles and technique of tap dancing combined with rhythm and jazz for modern movement and aesthetic approach to dance as an art form.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate a command of tap dance terminology;
    • demonstrate a knowledge of introductory level of tap dance warm-ups;
    • apply rhythms, beats, and general movements to choreographed floor progressions;
    • choreograph and perform an original dance routine to music or routine taught by instructor performed to music;
    • recognize his/her gain in self-awareness and confidence through mastering better control over his/her body actions/expressions; and
    • recognize an appreciation of dance both as an art form and for personal enjoyment.


    F/S (C)

  
  •  

    DN 112 - Intermediate Tap Dance


    Credit Hours: 4

    Designed for students who have some previous dance experience and who want to further their skills in tap dancing.  The fundamental principles and technique of tap dancing, combined with rhythm and jazz, for modern movement and aesthetic approach to dance as an art form will be covered.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate a command of tap dance terminology;
    • demonstrate a knowledge of introductory level of tap dance warm-ups;
    • apply rhythms, beats, and general movements to choreographed floor progressions;
    • choreograph and perform an original dance routine to music or routine taught by instructor performed to music;
    • recognize his/her gain in self-awareness and confidence through mastering better control over his/her body actions and/or expressions; and
    • appreciate dance both as an art form and a means of personal enjoyment.


    F/S (C)


Dental Assisting

  
  •  

    DS 100 - Dental Assisting I


    Credit Hours: 4

    This combination lecture/lab course introduces the students to the fundamentals of dental assisting while providing the opportunity to practice skills in a clinical setting. Techniques of chairside dental assisting are emphasized as well as clinical procedures, materials, instruments and equipment. Detailed instruction is provided in infection control procedures and occupational health and safety techniques following CDC and OSHA guidelines.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of this course, the student should be able to:

    • identify the members, functions and educational requirements of the dentalhealthcare team;
    • describe the nine recognized dental specialties;
    • operate basic dental office equipment;
    • demonstrate four-handed chairside assisting techniques;
    • maintain operating field during chairsidedental procedures;
    • name basic hand and rotary instrumentsand their uses;
    • assist with dental anesthesia and sedation;
    • assist with general dentistry procedures;
    • recognize the diseases of major concern in dentistry;
    • prevent disease transmission in the dentaloffice;
    • properly utilize personal protective equipment;
    • clean and disinfect contaminated surfaces, equipment and dental unit waterlines;
    • clean, package, sterilize and store dental instruments;
    • implement a quality assurance program for infection control procedures;
    • develop a hazard communication program for the dental office; and
    • incorporate ergonomic techniques duringchairside assisting procedures.

     

    Corequisites: All first-semester Dental Assisting courses.
    F (N)

  
  •  

    DS 110 - Dental Biomedical Sciences


    Credit Hours: 2

    This course provides basic knowledge of the external and internal structures of the head and neck as related to dentistry. Bones, muscles, nerves, blood vessels and glands are emphasized, as well as landmarks of the face and oral cavity. Detailed study of the dentition includes tooth names, surfaces, morphology, functions, numbering systems and dental charting, in addition to the embryologic and histologic development and eruption of the teeth.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of this course, the student should be able to:

    • list and identify tooth names, surfaces, numbers, anatomical landmarks and functions;
    • compare and contrast the primary and permanent dentitions and eruption schedules;
    • accurately record the dentition and dental restorations in a dental chart;
    • list and identify the external and internal landmarks of the face and oral cavity;
    • identify and locate the salivary glands, lymph node sites, and sinuses of the head and neck and their functions;
    • locate and identify the major bones, muscles, nerves, and blood vessels of the head and neck as pertaining to dentistry;
    • identify the components of the temporo-mandibular joint and their functions;
    • describe the stages of pregnancy and embryologic development of the teeth and oral cavity;
    • describe the tooth tissues and their components; and
    • name the parts and functions of the periodontium.


    Corequisites: All first-semester Dental Assisting courses.
    F (N)

  
  •  

    DS 120 - Dental Sciences


    Credit Hours: 2

    The importance of proper diet and nutrition to overall health and its impact on the oral cavity is explored, with emphasis on the relationship of carbohydrates to the decay process. Students learn about the disease process and to differentiate and identify normal and pathologic conditions of the oral cavity. The role of pharmacology in dentistry is discussed along with the importance of the patient medical history. Includes the recognition and response to medical emergencies in the dental office.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • name the components and recommendations of the Food Guide Pyramid;
    • discuss the U.S. Food Guidelines;
    • explain the effects of diet and nutrition on the oral cavity;
    • explain the relationship of cariogenic food to the decay process;
    • list the major nutrients, their functions, and sources;
    • recognize signs and symptoms of eating disorders and the effect on the oral cavity;
    • interpret information located on food labels;
    • adapt ethnic, religious and alternative diets into the framework of a balanced diet;
    • list the eight sources of information utilized to form a final diagnosis;
    • differentiate between normal and abnormal conditions of the oral cavity;
    • describe the signs, symptoms and steps of the inflammatory process;
    • describe the classifications of oral lesions;
    • identify lesions according to the placement, appearance and medical history;
    • describe the types and known causes of orofacial developmental disorders;
    • describe the oral implications of HIV/AIDS;
    • list the warning signs and appearances of oral cancer;
    • describe the guidelines of prescription writing and pharmacy calls;
    • utilize various drug reference materials to access information;
    • list and describe the drug schedules under Controlled Substances Act;
    • name the routes of drug administration and phases of drug activity in the body;
    • list the potential adverse effects of drug usage;
    • demonstrate an understanding of the drugs  used in dentistry;
    • describe the classic signs and symptoms of  a medical emergency;
    • discuss the methods of response to common medical emergencies in the dental office; and
    • list the basic items to include in an office emergency kit.


    Corequisites: All first-semester Dental Assisting courses.
    F (N)

  
  •  

    DS 130 - Dental Laboratory Procedures


    Credit Hours: 1.5

    This laboratory course provides the dental assisting student with the opportunity to manipulate clinical and laboratory materials and fabricate a variety of dental products used in preventive and restorative dentistry. Emphasis is placed on knowledge of dental materials, fabrication techniques, equipment usage and laboratory safety rules.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of this course, the student should be able to:

    • discuss safety precautions and infection control procedures to be observed in the dental laboratory;
    • list the basic types of dental laboratory equipment and their uses;
    • identify the classifications and uses of waxes in dentistry;
    • pour, trim and mount dental models using various gypsum products;
    • prepare reversible and irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials;
    • fabricate custom fit mouthguards and bleaching trays;
    • fabricate and fit provisional restorations;
    • construct maxillary and mandibular custom trays; and
    • debride and polish fixed and removable dental prostheses and appliances.


    Corequisites: All first-semester Dental Assisting courses.
    F (N)

  
  •  

    DS 150 - Dental Assisting II


    Credit Hours: 4

    This course provides an overview of the dental specialties and their role in general dentistry while providing the information and skills necessary to assist during related chairside procedures. Emphasis is placed on the expanded functions delegable to the New York State-licensed dental assistant.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of this course, the student should be able to:

    • develop an individualized caries prevention program for a dental patient;
    • perform supportive services delegable to the NYS licensed dental assistant;
    • demonstrate knowledge of instruments and materials as related to the recognized dental specialties; and
    • assist with dental specialty procedures.


    Prerequisites: All required first-semester Dental Assisting courses.
    Corequisites: All required second-semester Dental Assisting courses.
    S (N)

  
  •  

    DS 160 - Dental Practice Management


    Credit Hours: 2

    This course provides an understanding of the basic skills required for the daily business operations of a dental practice. Ethics and the law pertaining to dentistry are explored. Students are instructed in resume writing, interview techniques and the credentialing process in preparation for entry into the workforce.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of this course, the student should be able to:

    • understand the basic day-to-day operations of the dental business staff;
    • communicate effectively with patients, staff, and business associates through oral and written communications;
    • be familiarized with computer usage and business technology in the dental office;
    • describe methods of external and internal practice marketing;
    • maintain practice records and files;
    • file dental charts utilizing the indexing rules for alphabetic filing;
    • schedule patient appointments for maximum productivity;
    • list the steps of an effective recall system;
    • receive payments, post to patient accounts, and prepare a bank deposit;
    • understand the billing and collection process for patient accounts;
    • maintain an office inventory system;
    • understand the steps to third party reimbursement;
    • prepare a cover letter, resume, and interview strategy;
    • describe professional conduct during employment;
    • describe the application of ADAA Code of Ethics to daily practice;
    • maintain the patient's right to privacy according to HIPAA standards;
    • recognize the legal responsibilities of the dental team to the patient;
    • identify the risk factors and precautions necessary to prevent litigation against dental personnel; and
    • identify, analyze and apply problem solving skills in the clinical externship experience.


    Prerequisites: All required first-semester Dental Assisting courses.
    Corequisites: All required second-semester Dental Assisting courses.
    F (N)

  
  •  

    DS 170 - Dental Assisting Externship


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course emphasizes the practical application of the dental assisting skills obtained throughout the program. Students will be assigned to local dental health care facilities to participate in patient treatment under the guidance of licensed professionals. Students will acquire hands-on experience in clinical, laboratory and administrative procedures and complete a journal of externship activities. Seminars with the class and course instructor will be conducted periodically to review externship experiences.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the externship, the student should be able to:

    • interact in a professional and ethical manner with patients and colleagues;
    • perform the administrative skills required of a certified dental assistant;
    • perform the clinical skills required of a certified dental assistant;
    • perform the laboratory skills required of a certified dental assistant;
    • complete requirements for national certification and NYS licensure; and
    • obtain employment in an entry-level position as a dental assistant.


    Prerequisites: All required first-semester Dental Assisting courses.
    Corequisites: All required second-semester Dental Assisting courses.
    S (N)


Dental Hygiene

  
  •  

    DH 100 - Oral Health Services I


    Credit Hours: 5

    This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of clinical dental hygiene. It consists of three modules and each module must be passed in order to pass DH 100.  A clinic/lecture module introduces dental hygiene assessment and instrumentation techniques, orientation to the dental operatory, health history interpretation, intraoral and extraoral patient examination, dental charting, mandated infection control and confidentiality procedures. Dental models are used for practice and classmates serve as patients. Students must recruit patients for the second half of the semester.  Practical exercises in the management of medical emergencies will be conducted. A second module consists of lectures on professionalism which examine the characteristics that define a professional, the origin and development of dental hygiene as a profession, professional organizations with an overview of ADHA, ethics and ethical behaviors, cultural competence and an introduction to evidence-based decision making including the dental hygiene research agenda, and an introduction to self-assessment and critical thinking. A third module covers oral health education and introduces plaque-induced dental diseases such as dental caries, gingivitis and periodontal disease and the methods used to prevent oral diseases.  Minimum passing grade is "C-" for the written evaluations in each module and "C-" for clinical competency skill evaluations in the clinic module.

     

     

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • describe and illustrate the historical development of Dental Hygiene as a profession;
    • apply basic knowledge of personal and professional ethics by studying ADHA's "Code of Ethics" to include privacy policies and practices (HIPAA);
    • choose appropriate professional judgment and conduct in relationships with adult patients, peers, and instructors, and begin to apply self-assessment in evaluating clinical skills;
    • demonstrate a basic understanding of cultural competence;
    • show an understanding of evidence-based decision making by formulating a clinical question and using evidence-based resources to make a decision incorporating the Dental Hygiene Research Agenda;
    • apply safe work practices in the dental hygiene setting;
    • identify and utilize dental hygiene assessment instruments in a manner consistent with acceptable technique;
    • locate the oral structures of the oral cavity and differentiate healthy from diseased structures;
    • demonstrate the ability to gather an individual patient's assessment data;
    • describe and recognize the categories of periodontal diseases and the significance of their relationship to local and systemic factors;
    • identify basic individualized oral hygiene needs for a patient as a standard element in patient care;
    • describe and differentiate hard and soft deposits, relate the significance of their by-products, and their relevance to the current treatment of infectious diseases to the oral cavity;
    • explain the process of dental caries as an infectious multifactoral disease, its relationship to risk factors, nutrition, host response, and current strategies to reduce its prevalence;
    • document patient records according to current risk management practices;
    • describe current issues in dental hygiene practice and their impact on the profession; and
    • exhibits entry level understanding and application of self-assessment and critical thinking.


    Corequisites: All required fall semester, first year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum and a physician completed SUNY Allied Health Report.
    F (N)

    Withdrawal from or failure of a required course prevents further progression in the curriculum. General education courses may be taken earlier than indicated but may not be taken later than the prescribed schedule.

  
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    DH 110 - Head, Neck and Oral Anatomy


    Credit Hours: 3

    An introduction to dental terminology, morphology and functional characteristics of teeth and occlusion will be presented. The embryologic development of the teeth and orofacial structures as well as the histogenesis, structure and function of dental tissues are studied. Individual tooth development and eruption patterns of primary and permanent teeth are compared. A detailed study of the bones, muscles, nerves, vascular supply and specialized tissues of the head and neck will be presented. Application to clinical dental hygiene is stressed. Minimum required passing grade is "C-."

     

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • describe and apply the correct anatomical terms to tooth landmarks;
    • identify and relate the functions of teeth and relate tooth size, general shape, specific curvatures, and root structure to their function, various classification types and disease potential;
    • using models of human teeth and extracted human teeth, the student will know the arch to which they belong and identify all permanent and deciduous teeth;
    • demonstrate knowledge and application of the major dental coding system;
    • know precisely the usual order of tooth eruption to the level of determining the age of a patient with either primary or mixed dentition, incorrect eruption sequence, and/or the patient needing a professional referral;
    • know the histogenesis, structures, functions and clinical significance of the tissues enamel, dentin, pulp, and cementum to the level of the effect on disease progression, hardness, derivation, abnormality and clinical treatment;
    • describe and define the terminology, principles, stages of dentition, and functional and habitual relationships as they relate to dental occlusion;
    • define Angle's classification of malocclusion; know its usage and weaknesses and apply and identify the correct classification in mock situations;
    • describe the relationship of the orofacial structures and the temporomandibular joint to occlusion;
    • identify the bones, their landmarks, and sutures of the neurocranium and viscerocranium;
    • describe the origin, insertion, action, blood and nerve supply of the muscles of mastication;
    • name the suprahyoid and infrahyoid muscles and their roles in mandibular movement;
    • describe the structures, movements and clinical considerations associated with the TMJ;
    • understand the arterial supply and venous drainage of the head and neck and their association with local anesthesia and the spread of dental infection;
    • identify the specific branches of the facial, trigeminal, hypoglossal, and glosso-pharyngeal nerves and how they relate to local anesthesia;
    • discuss the lymphatic system of the head and neck and understand the spread of dental infection;
    • identify, locate, and describe the differences of the minor and major salivary glands;
    • identify and locate all of the extra and intra oral structures that are examined in an extra/intra oral examination; and
    • list and define the function of the soft palate muscles and their relationship to swallowing, chewing and speech.


    Corequisites: All required fall semester, first year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum.
    F (N)

    Withdrawal from or failure of a required course prevents further progression in the curriculum. General education courses may be taken earlier than indicated but may not be taken later than the prescribed schedule.

  
  •  

    DH 120 - Dental Radiography I


    Credit Hours: 1

    The technical aspects of dental radiographic imaging are covered. Lectures include an overview of radiation history, radiation safety and the ALARA principle, a discussion of dental films and digital sensors, intra-oral techniques, film exposure factors and image formation, film processing and mounting, basic image interpretation, quality control techniques and the care and maintenance of dental radiographic equipment. Minimum passing grade is "C-". 

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
     

    • discuss the rationale for taking dental radiographs;
    • comprehend basic radiation safety and protection procedures used in dental radiology;
    • describe the process of mounting dental films;
    • associate basic geometric theories and principles of the four intra-oral techniques used in the acquisition of quality dental radiographs;
    • identify errors and artifacts associated with intraoral technique or processing;
    • distinguish various types of radiographic film and image receptors utilized in dentistry;
    • explain the details of film processing, and the requirements of a functional darkroom; and
    • summarize quality assurance measures as they apply to dental radiography.


    Corequisites: All required fall semester, first year courses in the Dental Hygiene or Dental Assisting curricula.
    Concurrent Registration: DH 121
    F (N)

    Withdrawal from or failure of a required course prevents further progression in the curriculum. General education courses may be taken earlier than indicated but may not be taken later than the prescribed schedule.
  
  •  

    DH 121 - Dental Radiography Laboratory I


    Credit Hours: 1

    This laboratory course provides practical application of knowledge gained in DH 120. Using training manikins, emphasis is placed on the paralleling technique of acquiring dental radiographic images using image receptor positioning devices such as XCP instruments and Stabe film holders. Image receptor/film processing methods, film mounting, basic interpretation and self-evaluation of technique and processing errors are practiced. Techniques will include digital methods using phosphor storage plates, direct sensor technology, film based imaging and use of the nomad hand-held x-ray unit. Digital panoramic imaging will be introduced. Radiation safety for patient and clinician will be stressed. Minimum passing grade is "C-."

     

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • recognize and operate equipment designed for safe use of ionizing radiation;
    • identify parts of the dental x-ray unit and hand-held x-ray unit to include digital radiography components used to produce dental images;
    • place, expose and process a complete set of intraoral radiographic images, utilizing a variety of image receptors and holding devices;
    • arrange dental radiographic images using the ADA accepted method;
    • produce a diagnostically acceptable panoramic image, demonstrating use of a digital Panorex unit;
    • critique technique, processing errors and recognize artifacts, and select the appropriate corrective action;
    • perform quality assurance tests and document results as it pertains to equipment, dental radiographic image handling, and processing; and
    • demonstrate knowledge in the care and maintenance of dental x-ray equipment and digital radiograph components.


    Corequisites: All required fall semester, first year courses in the Dental Hygiene or Dental Assisting curricula.
    Concurrent Registration: DH 120
    F (N)

    Withdrawal from or failure of a required course prevents further progression in the curriculum. General education courses may be taken earlier than indicated but may not be taken later than the prescribed schedule.

  
  •  

    DH 150 - Oral Health Services II


    Credit Hours: 4

    Students will gain experience in the dental hygiene process of care while providing oral health services for patients.  This course includes three modules and each module must be passed in order to pass DH 150.  A lecture module and a clinic module will cover patient management, instrumentation techniques including ultrasonics, post-operative instructions, care and sharpening of instruments, production of diagnostically acceptable radiographs, polishing of teeth and stain removal, application of topical fluorides and anesthetics, instructing patients on oral self-care, self-assessment and critical thinking for the evaluation of patient care, dental operatory maintenance, sterilization and disinfection techniques, use of electronic patient records, and professional issues affecting dental hygiene practice.  Students must recruit patients for scheduled clinic sessions.  Practical exercises in the management of medical emergencies will be conducted.  A second lecture module will prepare students with the verbal and motivational skills needed for oral health education for client groups of all ages.  Discussions include writing objectives and developing lesson plans for group specific oral health instruction.  Students will work collaboratively in small groups in a service learning opportunity to develop and deliver a presentation to a target audience of children in the community.  Other topics will include dentifrices, mouth rinses and fluorides and re-mineralization therapies.  Minimum passing grade for the clinical module is "C-" for competency assessments plus completion of specific clinical requirements.  Minimum passing grade for lecture modules is "C-".

     

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • apply principles of professional, legal and ethical conduct, along with effective professional communication skills in all interactions with patients, peers, and other health care professionals;
    • apply medicolegal principles to the systematic collection, analysis and accurate recording of general, personal and oral health status of patients;
    • compose a planned sequence of care based on the dental hygiene diagnosis by identifying oral conditions, potential problems, etiologic and risk factors, and available treatment modalities;
    • analyze assessment data to implement a basic individualized patient education program;
    • appraise a target population, plan, develop, implement and evaluate an oral health education program with respect to age, nutritional needs, oral hygiene and caries prevention techniques, fluoride, habits, behaviors and problems with different age groups;
    • choose appropriate preventive and therapeutic treatment procedures to promote and maintain oral health;
    • evaluate the effectiveness of planned clinical and educational services and modify as necessary;
    • apply evidence-based decision making knowledge when providing dental hygiene services;
    • develop a knowledge base of current dental hygiene issues which impacts dental hygiene practice;
    • develop a PICO question, and identify and evaluate two research articles using the research pyramid to support the question; and
    • exhibit understanding and application of self-assessment and critical thinking.


    Prerequisites: All required first semester courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum must be passed.
    Corequisites: All required spring semester, first year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum, EG022 or current BLS certification, physician completed SUNY Allied Health Report.
    S (N)

    Withdrawal from or failure of a required course prevents further progression in the curriculum. General education courses may be taken earlier than indicated but may not be taken later than the prescribed schedule.

  
  •  

    DH 170 - Dental Nutrition


    Credit Hours: 2

    Students will gain knowledge in the basic principles of nutrition and relationship to overall health.  Fundamentals in biochemistry, physiological roles, dietary requirements, and sources of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, vitamins, and minerals are examined including systemic effects of nutritional deficiencies and excesses of these nutrients.  The impact of nutrition throughout the lifespan, cultural perspectives, and effects on oral health is emphasized.  Students will evaluate their personal diets utilizing food guidance systems.  Students will apply foundational knowledge in nutrition principles to assess the overall adequacy of patient's diet and implement nutritional counseling and intervention in oral health care settings.  Minimum passing grade is "C-."

     

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • explain why nutrition is important in dentistry and overall health;
    • describe the different food grouping systems and discuss recommendations for obtaining nutritional goals;
    • recognize the classes of nutrients: describe general functions, physiological roles, dietary sources and dental considerations;
    • apply the role of nutrition in the synthesis and maintenance of oral tissues and discuss clinical applications;
    • distinguish the disorders that may be related to vitamin and mineral deficiencies and excesses, with emphasis on dental considerations;
    • analyze and evaluate nutritional considerations and dietary applications appropriate for various age groups, populations, and cultures throughout the lifecycle; and
    • demonstrate knowledge in nutritional assessment, dietary evaluation, nutritional counseling and referrals for nutrition related dental diseases.


    Prerequisites: All required first semester courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum must be passed.
    Corequisites: All required spring semester, first year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum.
    S (N)

    Withdrawal from or failure of a required course prevents further progression in the curriculum. General education courses may be taken earlier than indicated but may not be taken later than the prescribed schedule.

  
  •  

    DH 175 - Oral Health Services III


    Credit Hours: 3

    Practical experience will be gained in applying the dental hygiene process of care during the treatment and management of dental hygiene patients and will include assessment, planning, implementation, self-assessment and critical thinking for the evaluation of patient care.  Experiences will include taking and interpreting digital dental radiographs, application of topical fluorides and varnishes, use of topical anesthetic agents, patient education, instrument sharpening, care of removable dental appliances and the application of sealant materials to prevent tooth decay.  Practical exercises in the management of medical emergencies will be conducted.  Current infection control and patient confidentiality procedures will be followed.  Students must recruit patients for treatment.  An introduction to Interprofessional Education is included.  Minimum passing grade is "C-" plus completion of specific clinical requirements. 

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • apply principles of professional, legal and ethical conduct, along with effective professional communication skills in all interactions with patients, peers, and other health care professionals;
    • apply medicolegal principles to the systematic collection, analysis and accurate recording of general, personal and oral health status of patients;
    • compose a planned sequence of care based on the dental hygiene diagnosis by identifying oral conditions, potential problems, etiologic and risk factors, and available treatment modalities;
    • analyze assessment data to implement a basic individualized patient education program;
    • choose appropriate preventive and therapeutic treatment procedures to promote and maintain oral health;
    • evaluate the effectiveness of planned clinical and educational services and modify as necessary;
    • apply evidence-based decision-making knowledge when providing dental hygiene services;
    • demonstrate skills for comprehensive patient care to include the placement of sealants; and
    • exhibit understanding and application of self-assessment and critical thinking. 


    Prerequisites: All required second semester courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum must be passed.
    Corequisites: Current BLS certification.
    SS (N)

    Withdrawal from or failure of a required course prevents further progression in the curriculum. General education courses may be taken earlier than indicated but may not be taken later than the prescribed schedule.
  
  •  

    DH 180 - Dental Radiography II


    Credit Hours: 1

    This course is a continuation of Dental Radiography I (DH 120).  The fundamentals of dental radiography are explored in greater depth.  Lectures will cover an overview of radiation history, patient management, special needs patients, clinical judgment and legal considerations for identifying patient needs for radiographic images, radiation physics and biology, and extraoral imaging.  Supplemental techniques will be discussed and include extraoral radiography, digital imaging, and CBCT scans.  Minimum required passing grade is "C-."

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • delineate events significant to the development of Radiography in Dentistry;
    • summarize the importance of patient management skills and patient education for the acquisition of dental images;
    • examine legal issues related to dental radiology;
    • assess factors identified in patient's medical/dental history, clinical assessment, and guidelines established by the FDA for prescribing dental radiographs to meet the individual radiographic need of patients;
    • describe how basic physics principles are applied to the charactristic of radiation and x-radiation;
    • illustrate the production of dental radiation, including the components of the dental x-ray machine and how it functions;
    • decribe radiographic image quality and discuss how quantitative factors influence image quality;
    • understand radiation biology and the effects of radiation on living tissues;
    • discuss procedures and management techniques for use with pediatric and special needs patients; and
    • identify auxiliary radiographic techniques and the rationale for using them in dentistry.


    Prerequisites: All required first semester courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum must be passed.
    Corequisites: All required spring semester, first year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum.
    Concurrent Registration: DH 181
    S (N)

    Withdrawal from or failure of a required course prevents further progression in the curriculum. General education courses may be taken earlier than indicated but may not be taken later than the prescribed schedule.
  
  •  

    DH 181 - Dental Radiography Laboratory II


    Credit Hours: 1

    Practical application of the knowledge gained in DH 180 will include infection control, supplemental intraoral techniques and panoramic radiography.  Hands-on training in identification of anatomical landmarks, dental caries, calculus and commonly used restorative dental materials as seen on intraoral and panoramic radiographic images.  Minimum passing grade is "C-."

     

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • apply principles of professional, legal and ethical conduct, along with effective professional communication skills in all interactions with patients, peers, and other health care professionals;
    • apply Infection Control Protocol to prevent cross contamination of equipment, image receptors and instruments in a clinical environment;
    • integrate descriptive terminology as it relates to dental radiographic images;
    • identify and describe normal tooth anatomy and supporting structures as viewed on intraoral or panoramic images;
    • differentiate abnormalities, artifacts or foreign objects viewed on radiographic images;
    • describe and categorize the radiographic appearance of dental caries utilizing the radiographic classification of caries;
    • identify and describe the radiographic appearance of commonly used restorative materials;
    • recognize periodontal disease as it appears radiographically utilizing AAP criteria;
    • distinguish trauma, pulpal and periapical lesions as seen on radiographic images;
    • select supplemental intraoral techniques; and
    • identify patient preparation and positioning errors, and articulate corrective action necessary to improve image.

     

    Prerequisites: All required first semester courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum must be passed.
    Corequisites: All required spring semester, first year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum.
    Concurrent Registration: DH 180
    S (N)

    Withdrawal from or failure of a required course prevents further progression in the curriculum. General education courses may be taken earlier than indicated but may not be taken later than the prescribed schedule.

  
  •  

    DH 190 - Periodontology


    Credit Hours: 2

    This course will focus on the study of normal and diseased periodontium including the structural, functional and environmental factors affecting these tissues.  Emphasis will be placed on etiology, risk factors, pathogenesis, treatment modalities, and therapeutic and preventive periodontics in a clinical setting.  Students will receive a sound foundation in the biological aspects of periodontal disease including immune system dysfunction, the dental hygiene treatment plan, classification of periodontal diseases, and periodontal treatment modalities.  At the conclusion of this course, the student should fully understand the evidence-based nature of periodontal diseases and the role of the dental hygienist as a periodontal co-therapist in the prevention, treatment and maintenance of the periodontal patient.  Minimum passing grade is "C-."

     

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • recognize the characteristics of the periodontium in health and disease;
    • evaluate and analyze the etiologic and risk factors involved in the initiation and progression of periodontal disease;
    • describe the classification, etiology and pathogenesis of inflammatory and other periodontal diseases;
    • present periodontal findings to the patient and other health professionals;
    • explain the relationship between periodontal disease and systemic health, and systemic disease and oral health; and
    • describe the need for, and importance of, clinical recognition as well as treatment of periodontal disease.


    Prerequisites: All required first semester courses in the dental hygiene curriculum must be passed.
    Corequisites: All required spring semester, first year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum.
    S (N)

    Withdrawal from or failure of a required course prevents further progression in the curriculum. General education courses may be taken earlier than indicated but may not be taken later than the prescribed schedule.

  
  •  

    DH 200 - Oral Health Services IV


    Credit Hours: 6

    Students will receive continued clinical experiences utilizing the dental hygiene process of care during patient management. The course consists of four modules and each module must be passed in order to pass DH200.  The clinic module includes practice in patient assessment, dental radiography, recording of vital signs, patient education and motivation, application of sealants, treatment planning, management of the child patient, developing a dental hygiene diagnosis, intraoral imaging, ultrasonic instrumentation, risk assessment, implementation and evaluation of treatment. Students must recruit patients for treatment and recall maintenance patients to evaluate treatment outcomes. A second module will include clinically related topics such as management and prevention of dental caries, nutritional counseling, tooth whitening agents, smoking cessation, recognition and management of patients with HIV infection, recognition and reporting of child abuse and neglect and dental emergencies. A third module covers advanced topics in periodontology including assessment and management of periodontal disease through instrumentation techniques, ultrasonics, soft tissue management protocols, care and maintenance of dental implants, systemic and locally applied chemotherapeutic agents and dentinal hypersensitivity. A fourth module will provide a comprehensive overview of patients with special needs and the factors which may complicate the management and delivery of dental hygiene services. A service learning experience will give students an opportunity to interact, self-reflect and critically think about providing dental hygiene services for a person with special needs. Minimum passing grade for the clinic module is "C-" for competency assessments plus completion of specific clinical requirements. Minimum passing grade for each lecture module is "C-."

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • independently practice and follow accepted infection control policies in accordance with the New York State Syllabus on Infection Control and procedures as stated in the Senior Competency Skills Packet;
    • collect assessment data based on patient's health history, comprehensive periodontal examination, vital signs and record patient data for advanced dental charting on the computer using critical thinking to determine best treatment for the patient;
    • differentiate between variances of normal and abnormal to include oral manifestations of chronic smoking and HIV infection;
    • classify a high risk caries patient, perform a dietary analysis and analyze all risk factors. Evaluate the risk factors and synthesize all data collected. Present research results when formulating patient education and treatment based on the results;
    • evaluate the need for radiographs (using the Guidelines for Prescribing Dental Radiographs). Expose, process and evaluate diagnostically acceptable radiographs utilizing the Radiation Safety Protocol to identify existing oral conditions;
    • develop a dental hygiene diagnosis and communicate plan for dental hygiene services to the patient and dentist, treatment plan and present case presentation, encourage smoking cessation for all applicable patients, recognize physical and emotional signs of child abuse and the method for reporting suspected child abuse, determine treatment modifications/homecare adaptations for the special needs patients and patients presenting with dental emergencies;
    • identify the high risk periodontal patient. Assess and manage periodontal disease through instrumentation techniques, ultrasonics, soft tissue management protocols, systemic antibiotics and locally applied chemotherapeutic agents, care and maintenance of dental implants, and  dental hypersensitivity;
    • choose appropriate skills for comprehensive patient care to include proper use of the clinical software, imaging, ultrasonic tips for advanced periodontal therapy, placement of sealants and application of adjunctive therapies for dentinal hypersensitivity, and control pain and anxiety during treatment;
    • provide treatment in a timely and efficient manner, evaluate clinical outcomes of dental hygiene interventions, refer patients as needed for consultation or care, as well as demonstrate organizational and problem solving skills;
    • evaluate the re-care patient and the effectiveness of treatment and homecare instruction;
    • evaluate one's own clinical performance mid-semester and at the end of the semester to identify strengths and weaknesses;
    • accept professional responsibility for behaviors consistent with medicolegal requirements, ethical expectations, and demeanor as defined in the Code of Ethics and the Senior Competency Skills Packet and Day Sheet;
    • research, design and present an in-class oral presentation defining the patient's disability, office treatment modifications, cultural differences among disabilities and homecare adaptations for the special needs patient;
    • identify the communication techniques taking into consideration the cognitive and communicative ability of the special needs patient; and
    • provide students with a service-learning opportunity to observe, participate, assess, educate, provide treatment and document services for individuals with developmental disabilities and physical impairments while under the supervision of faculty and SUNY Erie staff dentists


    Prerequisites: All required first year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum and DH 175 must be passed.
    Corequisites: All required fall semester, second year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum and current BLS certification.
    F (N)

    Withdrawal from or failure of a required course prevents further progression in the curriculum. General education courses may be taken earlier than indicated but may not be taken later than the prescribed schedule.
  
  •  

    DH 220 - Dental Materials


    Credit Hours: 2

    The theory and description of the materials used in general dental practice and relevant dental specialties will be presented.  Lectures will include general composition, physical and chemical properties and behavior of dental materials in the oral environment.  The theoretical ideal dental restorative material will be described and existing materials will be compared to it.  Sealant materials used in preventive dentistry will be discussed.  Minimum passing grade is "C-".

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • discuss the basic science, physical and mechanical characteristics, handling, and clinical performance of the materials used in the general practice of dentistry; 
    • apply knowledge of the basic science and behavior of existing materials in comparison to the new materials and techniques that are continuously evolving;
    • appraise safety issues of dental materials and plan safe work practices;
    • describe indications and applications of various dental materials in a clinical and laboratory setting; 
    • recognize and document patient records according to the dental materials and restoratives placed within the oral cavity; 
    • evaluate the selection, manipulation and performance of dental materials and restoratives for proper treatment while rendering quality dental hygiene services; 
    • differentiate between dental specialties and corresponding dental materials, armamentarium, and procedural applications; and 
    • appreciate the differences in race and culture while valuing the importance of educating patients in regards to preventive/restorative materials, treatment options and the proper maintenance of restorations and oral prostheses. 


    Prerequisites: All required first year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum and DH175 must be passed.
    Corequisites: All required fall semester, second year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum.
    Concurrent Registration: DH 221
    F (N)

    Withdrawal from or failure of a required course prevents further progression in the curriculum. General education courses may be taken earlier than indicated but may not be taken later than the prescribed schedule.
  
  •  

    DH 221 - Dental Materials Lab


    Credit Hours: 1

    This laboratory course will provide practical application of knowledge gained in DH 220.  Commonly used dental materials are prepared to gain experience in manipulation techniques and to ensure optimal results.  Clinical and laboratory materials will be used including impression, restorative, sealant and polishing materials as well as dental model plaster and stone.  An introduction to instrument set-up, transfer and assisting are part of the lab.  Minimum passing grade is a "C-."

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • adopt and plan safe work practices when working with dental materials in the lab and clinical setting;
    • demonstrate and utilize the principles of four-handed dentistry throughout laboratory sessions;
    • describe the principle properties and uses of commonly used dental materials;
    • choose appropriate procedures for handling and manipulation techniques of clinical and laboratory dental materials; and
    • evaluate the selection, manipulation and performance of commonly used dental materials and procedures.


    Prerequisites: All required first year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum and DH 175 must be passed or permission of instructor.
    Corequisites: All required fall semester, second year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum.
    Concurrent Registration: DH 220 - Dental Materials
    F (N)

    Withdrawal from or failure of a required course prevents further progression in the curriculum. General education courses may be taken earlier than indicated but may not be taken later than the prescribed schedule.
  
  •  

    DH 230 - Pathology


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course will examine the nature of disease, its causes, development and consequences.  Three main themes will be covered: a study of the basic principles of pathology, a survey of disorders affecting the oral and paraoral tissues, and a review of systemic diseases of importance in dental hygiene practice.  Emphasis is placed on the recognition and understanding of common local and systemic disorders affecting the oral tissues and the impact of these findings on the treatment provided by the dental hygienist.  Minimum passing grade is "C-".

     

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • describe and recognize basic tissue alterations occurring in the oral cavity;
    • describe the clinical and cellular mechanisms in inflammation, immunology, wound healing and neoplasia;
    • describe and compare soft and hard tissue oral lesions according to predisposition, (including the age, sex and race of the patient), cause, clinical and/or radiographic appearance using proper terminology, symptoms and treatment;
    • describe the effects of relevant systemic conditions on the oral tissues and the dental hygiene implications of these diseases;
    • explain pathologic findings to the dentist, patient and other health professionals;
    • analyze the importance and ethical responsibility for oral inspections, data collection, documentation and referral of patients with oral lesions;
    • discuss the procedures for using adjunctive screening technologies for early detection of oral cancer;
    • identify the eight diagnostic areas contributing to the diagnostic process; and
    • successfully complete a differential diagnosis project.


    Prerequisites: All required first year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum and DH175 must be passed.
    Corequisites: All required fall semester, second year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum.
    F (N)

    Withdrawal from or failure of a required course prevents further progression in the curriculum. General education courses may be taken earlier than indicated but may not be taken later than the prescribed schedule.

  
  •  

    DH 250 - Oral Health Services V


    Credit Hours: 5

    This course consists of three (3) modules and each module must be passed in order to pass DH 250.  A clinical module will continue patient treatment experiences to strengthen technical skills, planning, time management, self-assessment and critical thinking.  Experiences will include the assessment and management of children, adolescents, special needs and geriatric patients, advanced instrumentation techniques, air polishing, chemotherapeutics, intraoral and extraoral dental radiography.  Students must recruit patients for treatment and recall patients to evaluate treatment outcomes. A lecture module will concentrate on professional practice topics including the structure of American Dental Hygienists' Association (ADHA), legal aspects of dental hygiene practice, risk management, licensure requirements and procedures, health care provider/patient relationships, ethical dilemmas, resume writing, job interviewing techniques, employee/employer rights and obligations.  Another module will present clinically related subjects of emerging interest, topical reviews and dental specialty presentations.  Case studies will be utilized as a capstone activity designed to guide the development of critical thinking skills and the application of dental hygiene theory to comprehensive patient care.  Minimum passing grade for the clinic module is "C-."  Minimum passing grade for the lecture modules is "C-."

     

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • independently practice and follow accepted infection control policies in accordance with the New York State Syllabus on Infection Control and procedures as stated in the Senior Competency Skills Packet;
    • collect assessment data based on patient's health history, comprehensive periodontal examination, vital signs, and record patient data for advanced dental charting on the computer using critical thinking to determine best treatment for the patient;
    • differentiate between variances of normal and abnormal to include oral manifestations of chronic smoking and HIV infection;
    • classify a high risk caries patient, perform a dietary analysis, and analyze all risk factors; evaluate the risk factors and synthesize all data collected; present research results when formulating patient education and treatment based on the results;
    • evaluate the need for radiographs (using the Guidelines for Prescribing Dental Radiographs); expose, process, and evaluate diagnostically acceptable radiographs utilizing the Radiation Safety Protocol to identify existing oral conditions;
    • develop a dental hygiene diagnosis and communicate plan for dental hygiene services to the patient and dentist, treatment plan and present case presentation, encourage smoking cessation for all applicable patients, recognize physical and emotional signs of child abuse and the method for reporting suspected child abuse, determine treatment modifications/homecare adaptations for the special needs patients and patients presenting with dental emergencies;
    • identify the high risk periodontal patient; assess and manage periodontal disease through instrumentation techniques, ultrasonics, soft tissue management protocols, systemic antibiotics and locally applied chemotherapeutic agents, care and maintenance of dental implants, and dental hypersensitivity;
    • choose appropriate skills for comprehensive patient care to include proper use of the clinical software, imaging, ultrasonic tips for advanced periodontal therapy, placement of sealants, and application of adjunctive therapies for dentinal hypersensitivity, and control pain and anxiety during treatment;
    • independently (with supervision) provides treatment for children, adolescents, adults and geriatric patients in an efficient manner; evaluates clinical outcomes of dental hygiene interventions, refer patients as needed for consultation or care, as well as demonstrate organizational and problem solving skills; 
    • record all existing medical, oral conditions, assessment data and treatment procedures while maintaining patient confidentiality to include use of software imaging; utilize current insurance codes for all procedures and understand the significance of proper recording both on paper and in the electronic record;
    • assess, educate, provide treatment and document services to children when participating in a service learning opportunity to provide dental hygiene services to an underserved population;
    • evaluate the re-care patient and the effectiveness of treatment and homecare instruction;
    • evaluate one's own clinical performance mid-semester and at the end of the semester to identify strengths and weaknesses;
    • accept professional responsibility for behaviors consistent with medicolegal requirements, ethical expectations, and demeanor as defined in the Code of Ethics and the Senior Competency Skills Packet and Daily Clinical Evaluation Form;
    • identify the legal duties of the dental hygienist to the patient and the liability issues concerning negligence, technical battery, maligning a patient, breech of contract and the need for professional liability insurance;
    • apply the laws and regulations pertaining to the practice of Dental Hygiene in NYS, identify steps to prevent malpractice lawsuits in dental hygiene practice and explain the divisions of law affecting the Dental Hygiene Practice Act;
    • describe the purpose and legal requirements for licensure and the nature of licensure examinations utilizing the NYS document: "Laws and Regulations Pertaining to the Practice of Dental Hygiene" for case study;
    • describe the six major roles for dental hygienists as defined by ADHA; evaluate the various employment opportunities and develop a formatted resume; role playing will be used to simulate interviewing techniques;
    • define, discuss and identify the three areas of ethics, the concepts of professional ethics, elements of professional codes, and the steps in solving an ethical dilemma; problem solving for cases in private practices will be explored utilizing the problem solving model;
    • discuss several issues affecting the dental hygiene profession, implications for Dental Hygiene Practice and possible future solution; and
    • analyze and evaluate topics/experiences that will be presented to challenge the student's critical thinking to develop decision making skills regarding patient care and treatment recommendations.


    Prerequisites: All required fall semester, second year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum must be passed.
    Corequisites: All required spring semester, second year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum and current BLS certification.
    S (N)

    Withdrawal from or failure of a required course prevents graduation from the curriculum. General education courses may be taken earlier than indicated but may not be taken later than the prescribed schedule.

  
  •  

    DH 260 - Community Dental Health


    Credit Hours: 2

    General principles in the field of public health dentistry will be covered.  The course will concentrate on methods to improve dental health through organized community efforts.  Principles and techniques in the selection of data, appraisal of variability and correlation will be discussed along with the epidemiology of dental caries and periodontal disease.  Other topics will cover the ways and means of developing community dental health programs as well as a study of existing programs.  Students will receive field experience to develop or evaluate a community dental health program.  Minimum required passing grade is "C-."

     

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate knowledge of community oral health problems and their impact on community resources;
    • describe methods used to promote oral health awareness and disease prevention in the community;
    • identify and evaluate community oral health issues and strategies to address them;
    • describe human behaviors, cultural issues, political realities and technical challenges which affect community dental health initiatives;
    • define the skills required to act as a community dental health professional;
    • assess, plan, implement and evaluate community oral health programs;
    • evaluate journal articles and evidence-based clinical information;
    • develop an understanding of basic statistical principles, dental indices and use of computers in dental research and community dental health; and
    • deliver a presentation on APIE to peers, after presenting a dental health program at a community site, utilizing self-assessment and critical thinking to problem solve and meet the needs of the population.


    Prerequisites: All required fall semesters, second year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum must be passed.
    Corequisites: All required spring semester, second year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum.
    S (N)

    Withdrawal from or failure of a required course prevents graduation from the curriculum. General education courses may be taken earlier than indicated but may not be taken later than the prescribed schedule.

  
  •  

    DH 270 - Pharmacology


    Credit Hours: 2

    An overview of pharmacologic principles will include drug absorption, bioavailability, metabolism and excretion, toxicity and side effects, routes of administration and placebo effect.  Drug categories covered include anti-infectives, autonomic drugs, analgesics, anesthetics, antianxiety drugs, anti-plaque agents, anticonvulsants, antihistamines and cardiovascular medications.  Additional topics will include prescription writing, alcohol and drug abuse, and drugs for emergency use.  The impact of various drugs and drug combinations on the management of dental hygiene patients will be stressed.  Minimum required passing grade is "C-."

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate a basic knowledge of pharmacology as it relates to dental patient management;
    • discuss the principles of pharmacodynamics, including drug interrelationships;
    • understand the physiology of body systems and the effects of various medications;
    • describe the pharmacology of several drug categories and how they are used to treat various disease conditions;
    • describe the immediate treatment for medical/dental emergencies which may be encountered by personnel in the dental office; and
    • interpret and understand medical case histories relative to dental treatment.


    Prerequisites: All required fall semester, second year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum must be passed.
    Corequisites: All required spring semester, second year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum.
    S (N)

    Withdrawal from or failure of a required course prevents graduation from the curriculum. General education courses may be taken earlier than indicated but may not be taken later than the prescribed schedule.
  
  •  

    DH 280 - Pain and Anxiety Control


    Credit Hours: 2

    Effective pain and anxiety control are essential components of the management of dental patients.  This elective course will present 30 hours of didactic instruction required for a State of New York restricted certificate to administer local infiltration anesthesia and nitrous oxide/oxygen analgesia sedation during dental hygiene treatment procedures.  Topics include a review of dental neuroanatomy, respiratory anatomy and physiology, pharmacology of local anesthetic drugs used in dentistry and nitrous oxide/oxygen sedation, proper administration techniques, patient assessment, legal, risk management and ethical issues. The clinical requirements for the infiltration anesthesia and nitrous oxide analgesia certificate can be completed in the elective Pain and Anxiety Control Clinic, DH281. Minimum passing grade is "C-."

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • explain the New York State law (NYSL) as it pertains to restricted certification of dental hygienist to deliver N2O/O2 sedation and local anesthesia;
    • utilize the health history and evaluation procedures to detect medically compromised patients and discern those conditions that place the patient at risk for local anesthetics, vasoconstrictors and nitrous oxide/oxygen sedation;
    • differentiate between the pediatric and adult respiratory and circulatory physiology and related anatomy;
    • describe the stages of drug-induced central nervous system depression through levels of anxiolysis, conscious sedation, deep sedation and general anesthesia;
    • define and describe psychological, physiological, and anatomic aspects of pain and anxiety at a level appropriate for the dental hygiene practice;
    • describe the pharmacology of agents used in inhalation sedation, local anesthesia, and vasoconstrictors, including drug interactions and incompatibilities;
    • define the indications and contraindications for use of inhalation sedation and local anesthesia;
    • explain the recommended dosages of local anesthesia and nitrous oxide analgesia;
    • discuss patient monitoring using observation with particular attention to vital signs and reflexes related to consciousness;
    • list the selection and preparation of the armamentaria and record keeping while administering various local anesthetic agents and nitrous oxide analgesia;
    • recognize and manage the complications and reactions to local anesthetic agents and nitrous oxide analgesia;
    • utilize proper infection control techniques with regard to local anesthetic and nitrous oxide analgesia and proper disposal of sharps;
    • describe the use of inhalation sedation equipment;
    • recognize the potential for health hazards of trace anesthetics and be able to propose techniques for limiting occupational exposure such as appropriate scavenging systems;
    • discuss the abuse potential and hallucinatory effects of nitrous oxide analgesia; and
    • describe and communicate the postoperative care of the patient and instructions to the patient.

     

    Prerequisites: All required fall semester, second year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum must be passed.
    Corequisites: All required spring semester, second year courses in the Dental Hygiene curriculum.
    S (N)

  
  •  

    DH 281 - Pain and Anxiety Control Clinic


    Credit Hours: 1

    Effective pain and anxiety control are essential components of the management of dental patients.  This elective course provides 25 clock hours of instruction and supervised practice in the administration of local infiltration anesthesia and nitrous oxide/oxygen analgesia for the control of anxiety and pain during dental hygiene treatment.  The armamentaria, infection control, safe methods of administration, patient evaluation, monitoring and record documentation will be covered.  Participants will act as providers and as patients.  The scope of the course satisfies and is limited to the New York State clinical requirements for the Dental Hygiene Restricted Local Anesthesia/Nitrous Oxide Analgesia Certification.  Course grading is pass/fail.

     

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • evaluate a patient's health status, record vital signs and, when indicated, communicate to the patient the rationale and benefit of pain/anxiety control;
    • determine the proper local anesthetic agent and dosage with regard to a patient's health status and the treatment to be performed;
    • prepare armamentaria for administration of infiltration local anesthesia and nitrous oxide analgesia with scavenging system;
    • safely perform local anesthesia infiltration injections in various areas of the mouth and nitrous oxide analgesia while monitoring the physical status of the patient; and
    • demonstrate proper infection control procedures, disposal of sharps and patient record documentation.


    Prerequisites: Completion of DH 250 (Oral Health Services V), DH 280 (Pain & Anxiety Control), current BLS certification.
    SS (N)


Dental Laboratory Technology

  
  •  

    DL 110 - Introduction to Technical Dentistry


    Credit Hours: 1

    An explanation of the profession of dentistry and how the dental health team serves the public. The organization of dental laboratories, history of dentistry and medicine, quality control, bloodborne infectious diseases, antiseptic techniques, ethics, and the motivation for excellence in restorative techniques are discussed. Treatment of patients, including those of different racial, ethnic, gender, class and economic backgrounds is stressed.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • state the duties of the dental lab technician;
    • define dentistry;
    • explain the education necessary for licensing in dentistry;
    • list the dental specialties;
    • describe the various dental organizations;
    • list the reasons for the shift of the traditional role of women from the domestic to the professional;
    • discuss the differences of cultural-racial and socio-economic groups;
    • demonstrate an understanding of race, ethnic and gender relations in the United States;
    • illustrate knowledge of the pathology of bloodborne diseases;
    • employ antiseptic techniques in the lab;
    • identify the ethical, legal and regulatory considerations related to bloodborne infectious diseases;
    • list types of health care insurance; and
    • demonstrate knowledge of the history of medical and dental care.


    F (S)

  
  •  

    DL 111 - Dental Anatomy, Physiology, Occlusion


    Credit Hours: 2

    Introduction to the anatomy of the head and neck, and the physiology of occlusion with special emphasis on the anatomy of the individual teeth and surrounding tissues, including arteries, veins, nerve supply, muscle and bones.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • name and identify each tooth found in the adult oral cavity;
    • identify the anatomical structure and landmarks of any given tooth;
    • name and identify the surfaces of and principle anatomical landmarks of any given tooth (cusps, ridges, grooves, pits and developmental depressions);
    • name and identify the line angles and point angles of any given tooth;
    • list and identify those bones of the cranium and face that are directly related to the function of the oral cavity and list the function of each;
    • list the muscles that form the boundaries of the oral cavity and name the action of each;
    • list the muscles of mastication and give the origin, insertion and action of each;
    • trace the blood supply from the heart to the oral cavity including each individual tooth;
    • trace the venous drainage from the teeth and oral cavity back to the heart;
    • name the cranial nerves directly associated with the oral cavity and the teeth; and
    • locate and identify the principle anatomical landmarks found on casts of the edentulous maxilla and mandible.


    Concurrent Registration: DL 112
    F (S)

  
  •  

    DL 112 - Lab for DL 111


    Credit Hours: 3

    Study of the actual bones of the skull. Students will draw each tooth from central incisor through the second molar on one side of the upper and lower arches. Fourteen teeth are carved in wax.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • draw to scale and carve each permanent tooth.


    Concurrent Registration: DL 111
    F (S)

  
  •  

    DL 113 - Biomedical Materials and Dental Metallurgy


    Credit Hours: 1

    Study of the composition, properties and uses of biomedical materials such as gypsum products, impression materials, plastics, waxes and duplicating materials. The laboratory exercises are designed to illustrate the properties and uses of the materials studied and the results of proper and improper manipulation. Dental metallurgy includes the study of precious metal and chrome alloys, physical and mechanical properties, crystalline structure, investments, methods of casting, soldering, heat equipment and polishing.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • list physical properties of various dental materials;
    • describe uses of gypsum products;
    • identify uses for alloys;
    • illustrate properties and uses of resins;
    • distinguish between karat and fineness of precious metals;
    • describe the uses of porcelain in dentistry;
    • operate various dental laboratory machinery; and
    • identify physical properties and use of dental waxes.


    Concurrent Registration: DL 114
    F (S)

  
  •  

    DL 114 - Lab for DL 113


    Credit Hours: 1

    Laboratory exercises designed to illustrate the properties and uses of the materials studied and the results of proper and improper manipulation.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course students will be able to:

    • list physical properties of various dental materials;
    • describe uses of gypsum products;
    • identify uses for alloys;
    • illustrate properties and uses of resins;
    • distinguish between karat and fineness of precious metals;
    • describe the uses of porcelain in dentistry;
    • operate various dental laboratory machinery; and
    • identify physical properties and use of dental waxes.


    Concurrent Registration: DL 113
    F (S)

  
  •  

    DL 115 - Complete Denture Technique I


    Credit Hours: 1

    Study of the fabrication of complete dentures.Theoretical concepts include methods for the construction of acrylic base plates and occlusion rims, and mounting casts using both the face-bow and arbitrary method. Demonstrations for the arrangements of teeth for complete maxillary and mandibular dentures on an semi-adjustable articulator and simple denture repair.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate knowledge and use of the semi-adjustable articulators;
    • apply this knowledge of the semi-adjustable articulators in arrangement of various degrees of posterior teeth such as rational to 33 degree posteriors;
    • simulate masticatory functions using the semi-adjustable articulator such as protrusive check bite, left and right lateral excursion, etc.; and
    • demonstrate how to fabricate a functional denture that has appealing esthetic value.
       

     

    Concurrent Registration: DL 116
    F (S)

  
  •  

    DL 116 - Lab for DL 115


    Credit Hours: 3

    Construction of complete dentures. Laboratory work includes methods for the construction of acrylic base plates and occlusion rims, and mounting casts using the face-bow and the arbitrary method. Arrangements of teeth for complete maxillary and mandibular dentures on an semi-adjustable articulator and simple denture repair.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate knowledge and use of the semi-adjustable articulator;
    • apply this knowledge of the semi-adjustable articulators in arrangement of various degrees of posterior teeth such as rational to 33 degree posteriors;
    • simulate masticatory functions using the semi-adjustable articulator such as protrusive check bite, left and right lateral excursion, etc.; and
    • construct a functional complete denture that has appealing esthetic value.


    Concurrent Registration: DL 115
    F (S)

  
  •  

    DL 121 - Removable Partial Denture Technique


    Credit Hours: 1

    Study of basic techniques used in the fabrication of removable partial dentures. Demonstrations and RPD theory include fundamentals of survey and design, constructing refractory casts and casting removable partial denture frameworks utilizing chrome nickel alloy.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate knowledge of surveying and designing by constructing removable partial denture frameworks which require clasping of rotated and tilted teeth;
    • demonstrate all laboratory procedures necessary to construct partial denture frameworks using the combo-type cast wrought wire clasp;
    • explain all laboratory procedures necessary to construct partial denture frameworks using the combo-type wrought wire clasp soldered to framework;
    • explain quality control inspections of the finished frameworks, troubleshoot errors, and corrective action when indicated; and
    • explain how to mount maxillary and mandibular casts on a straight line articulator with trial base plates using plastic or porcelain teeth, process and finish.


    Prerequisites: DL 115, DL 116
    Concurrent Registration: DL 122
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 122 - Lab for DL 121


    Credit Hours: 3

    Fabrication of the basic techniques used in the construction of removable partial dentures. This includes fundamentals of survey and design, the construction of refractory casts and casting removable partial denture frameworks utilizing chrome nickel alloy.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate knowledge of surveying and designing by constructing removable partial denture frameworks which require clasping of rotated and tilted teeth;
    • perform all laboratory procedures necessary to construct partial denture frameworks using the combo-type cast wrought wire clasp;
    • perform all laboratory procedures necessary to construct partial denture frameworks using the combo-type wrought wire clasp soldered to framework;
    • perform quality control inspections of the finished frameworks, troubleshoot errors, and take corrective action when indicated; and
    • mount maxillary and mandibular casts on straight line articulator with trial base plates using plastic or porcelain teeth, process and finish.


    Prerequisites: DL 116
    Concurrent Registration: DL 121
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 123 - Restorative Technique I


    Credit Hours: 2

    Study of all fixed restorative techniques used in dentistry including the construction of inlays, crowns and bridges in the anterior and posterior regions plus the introduction of implantology. The theory of fixed prosthodontics will be explained.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • explain the various clinical and laboratory procedures necessary to fabricate a fixed restoration;
    • list and describe the various types of fixed restorations fabricated in the dental laboratory;
    • name and describe the common types of tooth preparations employed by the dentist;
    • explain the purpose of an individual custom impression tray and construct a clinically acceptable quadrant custom impression tray from a diagnostic cast;
    • list the requirements of an acceptable working cast and list the methods for fabrication from the impression for an accurate cast with removable dies;
    • identify different types of margins;
    • list types of fixed restorations;
    • list classes of inlays and the modification of inlays;
    • describe methods to prevent contamination especially the methods for the control of bloodborne infectious diseases; and
    • demonstrate how to correctly use an infection control station.


    Prerequisites: DL 111, DL 112, DL 113, DL 114
    Concurrent Registration: DL 124
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 124 - Lab for DL 123


    Credit Hours: 3

    Construction of inlays, crowns and bridges in the anterior and posterior regions, plus the introduction of implantology.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • explain the various clinical and laboratory procedures necessary to fabricate a fixed restoration;
    • list and describe the various types of fixed restorations fabricated in the dental laboratory;
    • construct a full crown;
    • construct a 3/4 crown;
    • explain the purpose of an individual custom impression tray and construct a clinically acceptable quadrant custom impression tray from a diagnostic cast;
    • list the requirements of an acceptable working cast and fabricate from the impression an accurate, bubble free cast with removable dies;
    • identify the margins and correctly prepare, trim, and ditch the removable dies; and
    • correctly manipulate inlay wax and fabricate clinically acceptable wax patterns for various fixed restorations.


    Prerequisites: DL 111, DL 112, DL 113, DL 114
    Concurrent Registration: DL 123
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 125 - Complete Denture Technique II


    Credit Hours: 1

    Continuing study of the fabrication of complete dentures. The theory of the construction of complete maxillary and mandibular dentures using various posterior tooth forms on a semi-adjustable articulator and procedures for relining and rebasing complete dentures.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate knowledge and use of the semi-adjustable articulators;
    • apply this knowledge of the semi-adjustable articulators in arrangement of various degrees of posterior teeth such as rational to 33 degree posteriors;
    • simulate masticatory functions using the semi-adjustable articulator such as protrusive check bite, left and right lateral excursion, etc; and
    • differentiate between various types of repairs, relines, and rebases. Perform the work necessary for each repair.


    Prerequisites: DL 115, DL 116
    Concurrent Registration: DL 126
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 126 - Lab for DL 125


    Credit Hours: 3

    Continuing study of the fabrication of complete dentures. Laboratory work includes construction of complete maxillary and mandibular dentures using various posterior tooth forms on a semi-adjustable articulator and procedures for relining and rebasing complete dentures.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate knowledge and use of the semi-adjustable articulators;
    • apply this knowledge of the semi-adjustable articulators in arrangement of various degrees of posterior teeth such as rational to 33 degree posteriors;
    • simulate masticatory functions using the semi-adjustable articulator such as protrusive check bite, left and right lateral excursion, etc.;
    • differentiate between various types of repairs, relines, and rebases. Perform the work necessary for each repair;
    • construct a functional denture that has appealing esthetic value; and
    • construct and fabricate surgical splints with procedures for completion.


    Prerequisites: DL 115, DL 116
    Concurrent Registration: DL 125
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 230 - Dental Laboratory Practice I


    Credit Hours: 3

    The fabrication of oral prostheses from casts and prescriptions of actual cases. The dentist-dental laboratory relationship is stressed. Students may choose cases in the specialty of their choice.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • interpret a dentist's prescription;
    • construct an appliance per the prescription;
    • order supplies, maintain necessary inventory and price finished products;
    • approach a dentist to obtain cases;
    • illustrate lab management practices (billing, bookkeeping, etc.);
    • demonstrate the care and maintenance of equipment; and
    • explain the techniques of disinfecting and sanitizing.
       


    F (S)

  
  •  

    DL 231 - Removable Partial Denture Technique II


    Credit Hours: 1

    Continuing study of advanced techniques in removable partial denture design. Laboratory exercises include the use of internal attachments, precision attachments, and advanced clasping techniques.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate knowledge of surveying and designing by constructing removable partial denture frameworks which require clasping of rotated and tilted teeth;
    • construct removable partial denture frameworks which require the use of tube teeth;
    • construct removable partial denture frameworks which require the use of plastic facings with plastic backings;
    • perform all laboratory procedures necessary to construct partial denture frameworks using the combo-type cast wrought wire clasp;
    • perform all laboratory procedures necessary to construct partial denture frameworks using the combo-type wrought wire clasp soldered to framework;
    • perform quality control inspections of the finished frameworks, troubleshoot errors, and take corrective action when indicated; and
    • mount maxillary and mandibular casts on straight line articulator with trial base plates using plastic or porcelain teeth, process and finish.


    Prerequisites: DL 121, DL 122
    Concurrent Registration: DL 232
    F (S)

  
  •  

    DL 232 - Lab for DL 231


    Credit Hours: 2

    Continuing study of advanced techniques in removable partial denture design. Construction of various types of removable partial dentures. Laboratory exercises include the use of internal attachments, precision attachments, and advanced clasping techniques.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate knowledge of surveying and designing by constructing removable partial denture frameworks which require clasping of rotated and tilted teeth;
    • construct removable partial denture framework which require the use of tube teeth;
    • construct removable partial denture framework which require the use of plastic facings with plastic backings;
    • perform all laboratory procedures necessary to construct partial denture frameworks using the combo-type cast wrought wire clasp;
    • perform all laboratory procedures necessary to construct partial denture frameworks using the combo-type wrought wire clasp soldered to framework;
    • perform quality control inspections of the finished frameworks, troubleshoot errors, and take corrective action when indicated; and
    • mount maxillary and mandibular casts on straight line articulator with trial base plates using plastic or porcelain teeth, process and finish.


    Prerequisites: DL 121, DL 122
    Concurrent Registration: DL 231
    F (S)

  
  •  

    DL 233 - Restorative Technique II


    Credit Hours: 1

    Study of the techniques for the construction of bridges with a gold framework. Theory of the construction of one, two-tooth maxillary and one, three-tooth mandibular bridge.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • define working models;
    • define and identify 3-unit bridge and ¾ crown;
    • define soldering procedures;
    • name veneer materials; and
    • list various designs for veneer substructures.


    Prerequisites: DL 123, DL 124
    Concurrent Registration: DL 234
    F (S)

  
  •  

    DL 234 - Lab for DL 233


    Credit Hours: 3

    Construction of bridges combining facing material, technique metal, chrome cobalt and gold frameworks. Minimum requirements are the construction of different types of bridges.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • construct working models;
    • prepare and construct 3-unit bridge;
    • construct ¾ crown;
    • demonstrate spruing capabilities;
    • demonstrate and perform investing techniques using Whip-Mix machine;
    • perform casting procedure;
    • perform soldering procedure;
    • develop and perform a solder joint on a 3-unit posterior bridge;
    • design PFM substructure;
    • apply veneer materials; and
    • illustrate finishing and polishing procedures using appropriate materials.


    Prerequisites: DL 123, DL 124
    Concurrent Registration: DL 233
    F (S)

  
  •  

    DL 235 - Ceramics Technique I


    Credit Hours: 1

    Study of the physical properties and manipulation of porcelain, including staining and personalization, and techniques for fabrication of porcelain crowns. Demonstration of the fabrication of porcelain units including the preparation of dies, firing and glazing.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • identify different types of tooth preparations for ceramic restorations;
    • recognize different types of ceramic alloys, i.e. non-precious verses precious metal;
    • perform different ceramic waxing techniques, i.e. spruing techniques, investing techniques and metal design;
    • identify ceramic investments;
    • identify casting differences, i.e. high heat investment compared to low heat investment;
    • perform soldering techniques for ceramic metal;
    • teach the procedures of preparing and finishing ceramic metal for applying porcelain;
    • recognize ceramic finishing materials, i.e. burs and stones; and
    • identify all types of porcelain crowns.


    Prerequisites: All first-year courses
    Concurrent Registration: DL 236
    F (S)

  
  •  

    DL 236 - Lab for DL 235


    Credit Hours: 1

    Construct porcelain units including the preparation of dies, firing and glazing. Use of porcelain ovens, both analog and computerized. The fabrication of porcelain units includes the preparation of dies, adaption of platinum matrices, firing and glazing. Minimum requirements are three porcelain crowns and three stained or personalized units.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate mounting casts on semi-adjustable articulators;
    • construct three single units (anterior and posterior) and three unit bridge;
    • identify different waxing techniques;
    • perform different types of spruing techniques;
    • demonstrate investing procedure;
    • demonstrate casting techniques;
    • identify different types of ceramic metals;
    • demonstrate soldering procedures; and
    • perform and demonstrate metal finishing.


    Prerequisites: All DL 100 level courses
    Concurrent Registration: DL 235
    F (S)

  
  •  

    DL 237 - Orthodontic Technique 1


    Credit Hours: 1

    This course includes all the technical aspects of orthodontics. The study of the pouring, trimming and finishing of study models, wire bending technique, soldering, manipulation of self-curing acrylic and fabrication of removable and fixed orthodontic appliances.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • identify various types of malocclusions;
    • identify orthodontic study models;
    • design an orthodontic appliance capable of correcting a specific malocclusion;
    • construct a removable orthodontic appliance;
    • repair a removable orthodontic appliance; and
    • apply theoretic knowledge of functional appliances.


    Prerequisites: DL 111, DL 113
    Concurrent Registration: DL 238
    F (S)

  
  •  

    DL 238 - Lab for DL 237


    Credit Hours: 1.5

    Wire bending techniques. Construction of active and passive orthodontic appliances.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • identify various types of malocclusions;
    • fabricate orthodontic study models;
    • design an orthodontic appliance capable of correcting a specific malocclusion;
    • fabricate a removable orthodontic appliance;
    • repair a removable orthodontic appliance; and
    • apply theoretic knowledge of functional appliances.


    Prerequisites: DL 111, DL 113
    Concurrent Registration: DL 237
    F (S)

  
  •  

    DL 240 - Dental Laboratory Practice II


    Credit Hours: 4

    Continuing practice in the fabrication of all types of prosthetic appliances from casts and prescriptions furnished by students, local labs and dentists. Cosmetic dentistry will be introduced.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • interpret a dentist's prescription;
    • construct an appliance per the prescription;
    • order supplies, maintain necessary inventory and price finished products;
    • approach a dentist to obtain cases;
    • illustrate lab management practices (billing, bookkeeping, etc.);
    • demonstrate the care and maintenance of equipment; and
    • explain the techniques of disinfecting and sanitizing.


    Prerequisites: DL 230
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 241 - Senior Seminar


    Credit Hours: 1

    Comprehensive review of all aspects of dental technology, job opportunities, variations in state laws and ethics. The course is available to practicing technicians.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • identify all dental materials;
    • recognize pertinent areas of oral anatomy and their importance in constructing a dental prosthesis;
    • demonstrate knowledge in various phases of complete denture construction, partial dentures, restorative, ceramics and orthodontics;
    • display confidence in the ability to successfully incorporate knowledge of all dental technology courses into career goals;
    • recognize dental ethics, parameters, history and responsibility. Be aware of culturally diverse populations; and
    • demonstrate knowledge of protocols established to ensure asepsis, infection and hazard control, and disposal of hazardous waste.


    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 243 - Restorative Technique III


    Credit Hours: 1

    A continuing study of crowns, bridges and splints, including the use of precision attachments in ceramic bridges.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • mount practical cases on the semi-adjustable articulator;
    • describe casting problems and how to correct them;
    • describe a 3-unit broken stress bridge with mini rest attachment;
    • identify margins;
    • describe a semi-precision attachment;
    • describe a full-precision attachment;
    • describe a two-piece crown (post core and crown);
    • describe a one-piece post crown;
    • list spruing and investing procedures; and
    • translate prescriptions.


    Prerequisites: DL 233, DL 234
    Concurrent Registration: DL 244
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 244 - Lab for DL 243


    Credit Hours: 3

    Construction of dental prostheses including long span bridges, crowns, splints and precision attachments.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • mount practical cases on the semi-adjustable articulator;
    • describe casting problems and how to correct them;
    • construct a 3-unit broken stress bridge with mini rest attachment;
    • identify margins;
    • describe a semi-precision attachment;
    • describe a full-precision attachment;
    • desribe a two-piece crown (post core and crown);
    • describe a one-piece post crown;
    • list spruing and investing procedures; and
    • translate prescriptions.


    Prerequisites: DL 233, DL 234
    Concurrent Registration: DL 243
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 245 - Ceramics Technique II


    Credit Hours: 1

    The advanced study of various techniques for bonding porcelain to metal and methods of personalizing porcelain used in bridge construction. Laboratory experience includes fabrication of five single crowns and a three unit bridge.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • operate the porcelain ovens;
    • state different firing temperatures;
    • list ceramic metals;
    • identify opaquing materials;
    • define porcelain characteristics;
    • define staining and glazing;
    • describe types of staining procedures;
    • describe types of soldering techniques;
    • describe pressed glass techniques (e.max); and
    • translate prescriptions.


    Prerequisites: DL 233, DL 234
    Concurrent Registration: DL 246, DL 264
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 246 - Lab for DL 245


    Credit Hours: 1

    Bond porcelain to metal using the various techniques available. Construction of bridges employing porcelain techniques. Construct five single crowns and a three unit bridge.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • operate the porcelain ovens;
    • illustrate different firing techniques;
    • prepare metal structure for firing;
    • apply various opaquing techniques;
    • perform various build-ups of porcelain techniques;
    • demonstrate contouring of porcelain with appropriate material;
    • prepare porcelain crowns for glazing procedure;
      • use two types of glazing techniques (surface and natural);
      • illustrate staining techniques (internal and external);
    • perform e.max waxing;
    • perform e.max pressing; and
    • perform post soldering techniques.


    Prerequisites: DL 235, DL 236
    Concurrent Registration: DL 245, DL 264
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 250 - Dental Lab Specialties


    Credit Hours: 2

    Specialty topics in dentistry. The course includes infection control, maxillofacial reconstruction, and technicians responsibility post surgery for reconstituting maxillary and mandibular function and aesthetics. Surgical procedures will be described.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • describe osseointegration;
    • evaluate effect of bloodborne diseases;
    • describe the various types of bone implants;
    • construct complete mandibular and maxillary dentures for restoring function and aesthetics;
    • construct the required prosthodontic appliances according to the doctor's prescription;  and
    • describe the various types of surgical procedures required after accident or disease.


    Prerequisites: DL 111
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 251 - Partial Denture Seminar


    Credit Hours: 2

    Limited seminar; permission of the department head is required for acceptance.  Work is done in the SUNY Erie South Laboratory and in private dental laboratories.  The student constructs partial dentures for actual cases.  Appliance design is emphasized.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • translate a prescription;
    • survey and design according to prescription; and
    • complete fabrication of a removable partial denture.


    Prerequisites: DL 231, DL 232
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 253 - Complete Denture Seminar


    Credit Hours: 2

    Limited seminar; permission of the department head is required. The student designs and constructs actual cases (complete dentures which must be articulated) at SUNY Erie South Dental Laboratory.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • construct complete dentures from secondary impressions to completion;
    • construct complete immediate dentures to occlude with natural teeth;
    • construct cast palate and cast mandibular base for dentures;
    • rearticulate the completed denture on the semi-adjustable articulator for protrusive check bite, and left and right lateral excursions;
    • rebase and reline a denture following the dentist's prescription; and
    • complete repairs.


    Prerequisites: DL 125, DL 126
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 255 - Ceramics/Restorative Seminar


    Credit Hours: 2

    Introduction of methods of bonding porcelain to metal. Demonstrations, theory of metal bonding, use of porcelain furnaces. The student will fabricate porcelain to metal bonded crowns. This course is recommended prior to taking the mandated Ceramics I course.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • construct practical cases;
    • construct one, 3-unit bridge;
    • construct one, multi-unit bridge of 4 units;
    • contrast the practical use of different metals depending upon the actual case;
    • translate the dentist's prescriptions; and
    • demonstrate the use of basic ceramic techniques, materials and equipment.


    Prerequisites: Permission of the department head. DL 111, DL 123, DL 124
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 257 - Maxillofacial Prosthesis


    Credit Hours: 1

    An orientation in techniques of the laboratory phases of maxillofacial prosthodontics and the solving of simple maxillofacial prosthodontic laboratory problems. Topics will include facial prostheses, maxillary obturators, overlay appliances, prosthetic pharyngeal speech aids, radiation applicators and implant prostheses. Offered in cooperation with the Erie County Medical Center. Requires permission from the department head.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • construct a silicone nose prosthesis;
    • construct a silicone ear prosthesis;
    • construct a silicone eye prostheses;
    • construct a three-part speech aid (palatal section, bar, bulb) for a cleft palate patient;
    • construct a hollow acrylic obturator; and
    • construct an acrylic shell nose.


    Prerequisites: Three semesters of DL courses.
    Corequisites: Fourth semester of DL courses.
    Concurrent Registration: DL 258
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 258 - Lab for DL 257


    Credit Hours: 1

    Fabrication of maxillofacial protheses.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • construct a silicone nose prosthesis;
    • construct a silicone ear prosthesis;
    • construct a silicone eye prostheses;
    • construct a three-part speech aid (palatal section, bar, bulb) for a cleft palate patient;
    • construct a hollow acrylic obturator; and
    • construct an acrylic shell nose.


    Concurrent Registration: DL 257
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 260 - Dental Implantology


    Credit Hours: 2

    Didactic instruction and clinical application of the fundamentals of dental implants. The purpose of implants, metal selection, osseointegration, surgical techniques, prognosis and cost are some of the topics that will be presented. The advantages and disadvantages of several implant systems available will be discussed.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • select pertinent material for construction of implants;
    • distinguish between biocompatibility of various metals;
    • discuss different technical approaches;
    • choose relevant equipment;
    • list various surgical procedures;
    • prepare models for implant cases;
    • determine fixtures to be used during construction of implant cases;
    • discuss aesthetics;
    • construct an overdenture bar with attachments;
    • fabricate surgical stents;
    • discuss reline and repair implant cases; and
    • wax and cast UCLA type restorations.


    Prerequisites: DL 111, DL 233, DL 234
    Concurrent Registration: DL 243, DL 244, DL 245, DL 246
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 261 - Orthodontic Technique II


    Credit Hours: 1

    A continuing study of the fabrication of all types of orthodontic appliances including the filling of prescriptions supplied by the Department of Orthodontics at Great Lakes Orthodontics, Ltd.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • design an orthodontic appliance capable of correcting a specific malocclusion;
    • fabricate a variety of removable orthodontic appliances;
    • repair removable orthodontic appliances;
    • use a semi-adjustable articulator;
    • fabricate a TMJ splint;
    • apply theoretic knowledge of sleep apnea appliances; and
    • fabricate indirect bonding tray.


    Prerequisites: DL 237. DL 238
    Concurrent Registration: DL 262
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 262 - Lab for DL 261


    Credit Hours: 1

    Fabrication of advanced orthodontic appliances. Soldering and laser welding techniques. Introduction to digital orthodontics.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course students will be able to:

    • design an orthodontic appliance capable of correcting a specific malocclusion;
    • fabricate a variety of removable orthodontic appliances;
    • repair removable orthodontic appliances;
    • use a semi-adjustable articulator;
    • fabricate a TMJ splint;
    • apply theoretic knowledge of sleep apnea appliances; and
    • fabricate indiect bonding tray.


    Prerequisites: DL 237, DL 238
    Concurrent Registration: DL 261
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 264 - Lab II for DL 245


    Credit Hours: 1

    Continue practice in bonding porcelain to metal. Fabrication of prostheses using cosmetic dental procedures. Ceramic cosmetic techniques developed.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • apply porcelain to metal substructures;
    • construct practical cases whether single or bridges;
    • use internal porcelain modifiers and stains according to individual patient requirements;
    • construct porcelain butt margins; and
    • translate prescriptions.


    Prerequisites: DL 235, DL 236
    Concurrent Registration: DL 245, DL 246
    F/S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 265 - Cosmetic and Aesthetic Dentistry


    Credit Hours: 2

    Cosmetic dentistry is the use of materials to construct restorations without metal substructure, results of which more closely resemble natural tooth structure. The course will include didactic, theoretical, clinical and laboratory state-of-the-art techniques. Pressed glass will be covered.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • discuss the various types of restorative cosmetic materials that exist in dentistry today;
    • fabricate inlays, onlays, veneers and full crowns;
    • construct models and dies for class projects;
    • wax and press restorations of pressed glass, including veneers, onlays, inlays, single crowns and multiple units;
    • discuss the differences between the shaded technique and the layered technique of "Empress"; and
    • discuss and demonstrate the proper use of equipment used in cosmetic dentistry.


    Prerequisites: DL 111 DL 233, DL 234, DL 235, DL 236
    Corequisites: DL 243, DL 244, DL 245, DL 246
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 266 - Lab for Denture Set-Ups


    Credit Hours: 1

    The techniques used in the arrangement of anatomical, semi-anatomical and non-anatomical artificial teeth on a semi-adjustable articulator will be included in both lecture and laboratory exercises.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • construct complete dentures from secondary impressions to completion;
    • construct complete immediate dentures to occlude with natural teeth;
    • rearticulate the completed denture on the semi-adjustable articulator for protrusive check bite and left and right lateral excursions;
    • rebase and reline a denture following the dentist's prescription; and
    • complete repairs.


    Prerequisites: Complete Denture Technique I and II.
    F/S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 270 - Dental Laboratory Internship


    Credit Hours: 2

    A course designed to enhance the interaction between the technician and the dentist. The technician will assist clinical and surgical procedures and design prostheses in the clinical atmosphere. The technician will be more cognizant of patient needs.  The student may work in a laboratory or clinic, or fabricate working appliances for patients in our laboratories.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • construct a complete denture in a clinical atmosphere;
    • construct a partial denture in a clinical atmosphere;
    • construct a fixed restoration in a clinical atmosphere;
    • demonstrate an awareness of the psychological/special needs of the patient; and
    • demonstrate an awareness of the needs and requirements of the dentist.


    Prerequisites: All first and second semester DL Courses.
    S (S)

  
  •  

    DL 271 - CAD/CAM Systems for Dental Lab Technology


    Credit Hours: 1

    This course will instruct the dental technician on the essentials of computer-assisted design. Instruction of how to design and build prosthodontic appliances using the computer-assisted program will be the focus. The technician will scan the oral impression, which will then be shown on the computer screen in 3D format. The technician will be able to construct the appliance directly on the screen as the program will take the technician through the steps of constructing the appliance required. The computer designed appliance is then ready to be sent to the milling machine to be completed for setup and/or trial in the patient's mouth.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • select pertinent material for restorative product;
    • discuss different technical approaches;
    • choose relevant materials;
    • list various design procedures;
    • prepare design cases for milling;
    • determine fixtures to be used during construction;
    • discuss aesthetics; and
    • design a prosthetic appliance using the computer program.


    Prerequisites: DL 111, DL 112, DL 123, DL 124
    Concurrent Registration: DL 233, DL 234, DL 235, DL 236
    F (S)


Dietetic Technology-Nutrition Care

  
  •  

    NT 128 - Food Selection and Preparation


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course provides an introduction to the science of food selection and preparation with an emphasis on the chemical and physical changes that occur in processing, storing and cooking. Attention is given to preserving the nutritional and sensory characteristics of food by focusing on purchasing considerations, optimal storage conditions and appropriate preparation and cooking techniques. The function of ingredients is addressed as are cultural food consumption patterns and trends.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the term, the student will be able to:

    • apply safe food handling techniques to prepare food safely;
    • demonstrate an understanding of the functions of ingredients in foods;
    • prepare foods to maximize nutrient value and sensory quality;
    • demonstrate an understanding of the effects of food preparation on food constituents;
    • evaluate the quality of food products, discuss defects, and formulate probable causes for defects based on food science principles;
    • develop an informed understanding of cultural foodways; and
    • work effectively as a team member.


    F (N)

  
  •  

    NT 132 - Nutrition Care I


    Credit Hours: 3

    This introductory course presents the principles of nutrition including all nutrients, their sources and their requirements. Carbohydrates, protein, fat, vitamins, minerals and water are discussed. The use of dietary guides, nutrient charts, food exchange lists and computerized diet analysis programs for the planning and evaluation of a healthy diet are discussed.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the term, the student will be able to:

    • identify factors that impact an individual's food choices;
    • demonstrate an understanding of the metabolism of, absorption of, and functions of carbohydrates, protein, fat, vitamins, minerals and water in the body;
    • demonstrate knowledge of food sources of individual nutrients;
    • use dietary guides to evaluate menus and intakes; and
    • calculate the caloric needs of individuals.


    F (N)

  
  •  

    NT 134 - Health Field Orientation


    Credit Hours: 1

    This first half of a series examines the health field, the role of the dietetic technician and the interrelationships with other health care professionals.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the term, the student will be able

    • demonstrate an understanding of the role of the dietetic technician and his/her relationship to other members of the health care team;
    • demonstrate an understanding of policies and procedures, and health care laws that can affect nutritional care in a health care facility, and health care clients; and
    • explain computer uses in dietetics.


    F (N)

  
  •  

    NT 136 - Nutrition Care II


    Credit Hours: 3

    A study of nutrients and their requirements through all stages of the life cycle with focus placed on the role of nutrition in wellness promotion. The impact of psychological, social and economic factors effecting nutrient requirements is considered.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the term, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate basic knowledge of facts and terms related to lifecycle nutrition;
    • demonstrate basic understanding of normal nutrition needs throughout the lifecycle;
    • demonstrate an understanding of energy balance and weight management;
    • demonstrate application of nutrition knowledge and lifestyle needs to create appropriate menus for groups;
    • locate and accurately interpret current research literature on lifecycle nutrition;
    • prepare and deliver an effective presentation to classmates; and
    • use information technology.


    Prerequisites: NT 132, NT 134
    Corequisites: BI 178, NT 137, NT 138
    S (N)

  
  •  

    NT 137 - Clinic for Nutrition Care II


    Credit Hours: 3

    This clinical experience is conducted in a combination of wellness settings and acute care hospitals. This hands-on practicum emphasizes wellness promotion in a variety of community settings. Hospitals provide an introduction to the nutrition care process and highlight the role of the dietetic technician. Written and verbal communication skills are emphasized, including interviewing, counseling and educational material preparation.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the term, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate an understanding of lifecycle nutrition facts, concepts, generalizations, and feeding programs;
    • evaluate a "well" individual's intake; demonstrate an understanding of how to improve an intake;
    • apply principles and generalizations of energy balance and weight management across the lifecycle;
    • analyze the nutritional adequacy of menus for groups; propose appropriate changes where needed;
    • critically evaluate wellness nutrition issues;
    • demonstrate basic knowledge of facts and terms related to the nutritional care process;
    • demonstrate an understanding of the role of the dietetic technician in various hospital and community settings;
    • perform self-assessment; and
    • incorporate professionalism in dietetics profession.

     

    Prerequisites: BI 178
    Corequisites: BI 178, NT 136, NT 138
    S (N)

  
  •  

    NT 138 - Education for Dietetic Majors


    Credit Hours: 3

    Communication, educational principles and techniques in interviewing, counseling and teaching individuals and groups in clinical settings is presented. Student preparation of instructional materials and use of instructional media is included.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the term, the students will be able to:

    • interview patients/clients in a health facility;
    • identify dietary needs of clients using established guidelines;
    • describe the team concept in nutrition care of the client;
    • discuss nutrition counseling and its importance;
    • explain systems approach to nutrition services;
    • understand data collection as it applies to dietetic services;
    • prepare teaching and counseling plans;
    • write behavioral objectives;
    • plan, prepare and present lesson on assigned topic;
    • collect and organize resource file;
    • discuss documentation in the medical record; and
    • identify appropriate notes for the medical record.


    Prerequisites: BI 178
    Corequisites: BI 178, NT 136, NT 137
    S (N)

  
  •  

    NT 275 - Introduction to Food Systems Management


    Credit Hours: 3

    An introduction to the functions and tools of food systems management in health care facilities is provided in this first of a two-part course. Included are management roles of dietetic professionals, levels and tools of management, policies and procedures, human resource management, New York State safety and sanitation for health care, HACCP, food borne illness, menu planning and marketing.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the term, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate an understanding of leadership skills and basic management theory and styles;
    • demonstrate an understanding of various food service management tools, including: job descriptions, job specifications, job analysis, organizational charts, policy and procedures, and marketing;
    • demonstrate an understanding of human resource management, including: staffing process, orientation and training activities, (performance appraisals, disciplinary action, grievances, etc.), motivation, legislation and management relations;
    • demonstrate an understanding of menu planning for quantity food production;
    • apply menu planning principles to construct menus for a health care facility; and
    • demonstrate an understanding of food safety and sanitation.


    Prerequisites: NT 128
    F (N)

  
  •  

    NT 276 - Food Systems Management


    Credit Hours: 3

    A continuation of Introduction to Food Systems Management (NT275) including the application of nutrient modification to menu writing, purchasing, recipe standardization production and delivery systems, receiving and storage, inventory, equipment, cost analysis and financial control for health care food service. Waste management and management information systems in health care are also discussed.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the term, the student will be able to:
     

    • identify factors which determine types of menus and meal service in a health care facility;
    • apply procedures for standardized recipes;
    • compare standard portion sizes for various types of service;
    • analyze factors that affect purchasing;
    • distinguish between types of inventory methods used for cost control;
    • plan quantity and quality food production;
    • utilize and evaluate computer applications for food service management; and
    • examine factors effecting dietary costs and budget preparation.


    Prerequisites: NT 128, NT 275
    Corequisites: NT 277, NT 284, NT 285, NT 286
    S (N)

  
  •  

    NT 277 - Field Experience for Food Systems Management


    Credit Hours: 3

    This supervised practice provides field experience in health care settings focusing on practical application of knowledge provided in management courses. Projects include human resource functions, meal planning, food production, sanitation and safety, standardized recipes, purchasing, inventory, cost control and quality assurance. A capstone experience is provided with practice assuming the role of a food service manager in a health care facility.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the term, the student will be able to:

    • participate in human resource functions, including interviewing, performance appraisals, and discipline issues;
    • supervise and evaluate procurement, distribution, and service within food service delivery systems;
    • collect and process financial data to develop department budget and operating plans;
    • participate in equipment selection and design/redesign of work units;
    • participate in facilities planning and evaluate design;
    • participate in performance improvement/organizational change, including:
      • design outcome studies;
      • collect data;
      • assess problems;
      • implement change; and
      • evaluate outcomes.
    • plan, develop, and implement a menu that allows for special diet and texture modifications;
    • assist with the production of food that meets nutrition guidelines, cost parameters, consumer acceptance, and applicable laws and regulations;
    • standardize and test a recipe;
    • assist in maintaining and supervising a safe and sanitary food service environment;
    • perform ethically in accordance with the values of ACEND;
    • participate in performance review and self-evaluation;
    • communicate effectively with all staff and supervisors; and
    • use computer applications in FSM.


    Prerequisites: NT 128, NT 275
    Corequisites: NT 276, NT 284, NT 285, NT 286
    S (N)

  
  •  

    NT 282 - Nutrition Care III


    Credit Hours: 3

    Application of principles of normal nutrition to disease conditions which occur most frequently in adults and require dietary modifications. Nutrient content of modified diets is included. The nutrition care process in introduced.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the term, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate an understanding of the screening process;
    • demonstrate an understanding of the nutritional care process, including assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation;
    • demonstrate a basic knowledge of medical nutrition therapy for common conditions, i.e. hypertension, cardiovascular, obesity, diabetes and diverticular disease;
    • demonstrate an understanding of basic enteral and parenteral nutrition; and
    • translate medical nutrition therapy needs into menus for individuals and groups.


    Prerequisites: BI 178, CH 144, CH 145, NT 128, NT 136, NT 137, NT 138
    Corequisites: NT 283
    S (N)

  
  •  

    NT 283 - Clinic for Nutrition Care III


    Credit Hours: 4

    This supervised clinical practice in acute care settings focuses on the application of knowledge presented in Nutrition Care III. The nutrition care process and nutrition care of patients is practiced. Focus is placed on screening, interviewing and counseling of patients on specialized diets. Calculation of modified diets and medical record documentation is also emphasized.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the term, the student will be able to:

    • screen patients according to hospital protocol;
    • interpret anthropometric, laboratory, clinical, and dietary data to complete a comprehensive nutritional assessment;
    • design a nutritional care plan to support successful medical nutrition therapy for an individual patient;
    • calculate basic enteral nutrition regimens;
    • evaluate an individual's intake according to medical nutrition therapy recommendations and the individual's needs;
    • perform ethically in accordance with the values of the American Dietetic Association;
    • participate in performance review and self-evaluation;
    • counsel individuals on nutrition for common conditions;
    • demonstrate a variety of documentation methods; and
    • use the computer to obtain and communicate information.


    Prerequisites: BI 178, CH 144, CH 145, NT 128, NT 136, NT 137, NT 138
    Corequisites: NT 282
    F (N)

  
  •  

    NT 284 - Dietetics Seminar


    Credit Hours: 2

    This senior level course allows students to apply critical thinking skills to ethical and technological issues impacting the field of dietetics. Professional standards and issues are presented. Public policy development as related to dietetics is discussed. Also included is preparation for the registration examination for dietetic technicians, the employment application process and initiation of a professional development portfolio.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the term, the student will be able to:

    • analyze the concept of professionalism;
    • exhibit a basic knowledge of public policy development related to dietetics;
    • demonstrate an understanding of current reimbursement issues, policies, and regulations;
    • evaluate the role of ACEND in the career of the dietetic technician;
    • prepare for the job application process;
    • weigh non-traditional career options;
    • apply critical thinking skills to ethical and technological issues impacting the field of nutrition; and
    • use current information technologies for information and communication activities.


    Prerequisites: NT 282, NT 283
    Corequisites: NT 276, NT 277, NT 285, NT 286
    S (N)

  
  •  

    NT 285 - Nutrition Care IV


    Credit Hours: 3

    Nutrition care of residents in long term care is introduced along with geriatrics. Medical nutrition therapy for various diseases and health conditions which require dietary modifications including cancer, renal diseases, hepatic diseases, disorders of the GI tract, as well as those conditions less commonly encountered such as PKU and inborn errors of metabolism are also studied.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the term, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate am understanding of the nutritional care of institutionalized elderly residents;
    • demonstrate a basic knowledge of medical nutrition therapy for common conditions, eg cancer, renal conditions, bowel disorders; and
    • translate medical nutrition therapy needs into menus for individuals and groups.


    Prerequisites: NT 282, NT 283
    Corequisites: NT 276, NT 277, NT 284, NT 286
    S (N)

  
  •  

    NT 286 - Clinic for Nutrition Care IV


    Credit Hours: 3.5

    This advanced course provides the supervised practice rotation in long-term care settings with a focus on the application of the MDS and care planning along with practical application of knowledge presented in Nutrition Care IV. Practice in interviewing, counseling and group nutrition presentations for the geriatric clientele in health facility settings is provided. Calculation and planning practice for more complex dietary modifications is included. This rotation culminates in a capstone activity of assuming the role of a dietetic technician on a full-time basis in a healthcare facility.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the term, the student will be able to:

    • apply rules, regulations, and interpretive guidelines related to the nutritional care of residents;
    • develop appropriate, individualized assessments and care plans for long-term care residents;
    • design a nutritional care plan to support successful medical nutrition therapy for an individual resident;
    • evaluate a resident's intake according to medical nutrition therapy recommendations and the individual's needs;
    • perform ethically in accordance with the values of the American Dietetic Association;
    • participate in performance review and self-evaluation;
    • counsel residents on nutrition;
    • communicate effectively at health care team meetings;
    • demonstrate a variety of documentation techniques; and
    • use computer programs, as available, to assist with assessment, documentation, and nutritional care of residents.


    Prerequisites: NT 282, NT 283
    Corequisites: NT 276, NT 277, NT 284, NT 285
    S (N)

  
  •  

    NT 287 - Health Care Delivery Systems


    Credit Hours: 1

    This continuation of Health Field Orientation provides a broad understanding of the methods of delivery of healthcare in the United States. Healthcare is explored, including its history, delivery systems, manpower, distribution of resources, cost, finance, health policy, technology and future outlook.

    Course Outcomes
    At the completion of the term, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate a basic knowledge of the health care delivery system in the United States, including knowledge of health organizations and services available in the community;
    • demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between legislation, medical care and public health;
    • demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between lifestyle decisions and health maintenance;
    • apply basic level critical thinking skills to analyze various aspects of health care delivery, such as economic, personal responsibility and the impact of technology; and
    • identify members of the health care team.


    Prerequisites: NT 134
    F (N)


Drama-Theatre

  
  •  

    DT 100 - Fundamentals of Acting


    Credit Hours: 3

    A lecture and workshop course in the fundamentals of acting: concentration, imagination, voice and movement techniques. Scene study, character development, physical and psychological theories will be studied during the semester with an emphasis on performance.

    Fulfills SUNY General Education -- The Arts.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • understand an actor's responsibilities and relationships with other actors, sharing scenes, picking up cues and maintaining focus;
    • perform in a long scene from major plays or one act plays involving mime, conflict, and emotional response;
    • follow stage directions, show proper stage movement techniques including motivation, appropriate posture and walk for characters, gesture and stage business, body position and facial expression;
    • demonstrate good diction, correct pronunciation, proper phrasing and use of pauses, appropriate rate, pitch, quality, force, and projection in the development of a character; and
    • develop a role into a distinct, convincing personality, maintaining character, projecting emotions with proper restraint and maintaining the illusion of the first time.


    F/S (C, N)

  
  •  

    DT 101 - Introduction to Drama and Theatre


    Credit Hours: 3

    Broad informal introduction to central theatrical and literary elements of drama. Readings from classical and modern plays and surrounding criticism includes use of available presentations (radio, film, TV, recordings). First-hand experience of local theatre provokes analysis of theatre as a present and living form of human expression.

    Fulfills the following SUNY General Education categories:

    • The Arts
    • Humanities


    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • evaluate theatrical writings and performances based upon criteria introduced in class;
    • identify major genres of classical and contemporary theatre;
    • understand the importance of the playwright's theme, dramaturgy, intention, and character design;
    • demonstrate a familiarity with a general overview of theatre history;
    • demonstrate an understanding of basic theatrical terminology; and
    • demonstrate an understanding of the intricacies of theatre art and production.


    F/S (C, N, S)

  
  •  

    DT 102 - Contemporary Theatre Workshop


    Credit Hours: 3

    Various approaches to acting as a disciplined form of expression and communication. Physical and vocal exercises, breath control, yoga, games, sensitivity exercises, improvisation, spatial explorations, movement and behavior analysis lend new individual and group awareness. Some character study and scene work applied toward the end of the semester.

    Fulfills SUNY General Education -- The Arts.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • realize a gain in self-confidence and control of a dramatic situation;
    • realize a gain in voice articulation including volume, clarity and tone of speech for use in any field of study;
    • realize a gain in his/her ability to respond to an unplanned circumstance through an individual and group improvisational format;
    • grasp basic-level fundamentals of acting principles;
    • understand the importance of the playwright's theme, dramaturgy, intention, and character design;
    • demonstrate an understanding of basic theatrical terminology; and
    • perceive the intricacies of theatre art and production.


    F/S (C, N, S)

  
  •  

    DT 103 - Introduction to Theatre


    Credit Hours: 3

    An introduction to the theatre experience. This course will involve a survey of the development of theatre, acting theory and techniques, directing theory and methods and basic principles of stage design and stagecraft. Study will involve the relationship of these elements to the script and will emphasize the theatre as a form of cultural and social expression.

    Fulfills the following SUNY General Education categories:

    • The Arts
    • Humanities


    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • perform acting scenes involving improvisation, conflict, and emotional response;
    • read orally with an understanding of mechanics, projections, articulation, and enunciation;
    • realize a gain in his/her ability to respond to an unplanned circumstance through individual and group improvisational formats;
    • grasp basic-level fundamentals of acting principles;
    • understand the importance of the playwright's theme, dramaturgy, intention, and character design;
    • demonstrate an understanding of basic theatrical terminology;
    • perceive the intricacies of theatre art and production; and
    • follow stage directions and understand techniques to solve basic movement and special blocking movement problems.


    Cycles (C, N)

  
  •  

    DT 104 - Theatre Workshop


    Credit Hours: 3

    This is a workshop rehearsal performance course which will involve the student in the production of live stage theatre, children's theatre, or dramatic reading for the college and surrounding community. The students will develop their productions for performance on campus, at other schools, in libraries, etc.

    Fulfills SUNY General Education -- The Arts.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • understand how to organize, schedule and prepare a production of a one-act play, reader's theater, or other dramatic genre for the college and the surrounding community;
    • create and perform a character from a written script employing techniques of character development, movement, line interpretation, memorization, and delivery;
    • construct, paint, and set up scenery, shift scenery during a show, and strike the set after the performance;
    • prepare the light plots, chart and cue sheets, hang and focus the lights and operate them during the show;
    • schedule and attend rehearsals, take all notes for the director, supervise cast members, set, costume, and prop constructions for the show as stage manager (s);
    • plan, secure, and make costumes, clean press, and mend costumes during the show, store owned costumes and return borrowed/rented ones;
    • plan makeup charts for each actor, obtain supplies, assist actors in application, clean the makeup room and store all supplies;
    • prepare property lists for each scene, and locate prop and furniture items including rehearsal props;
    • advertise the show in newspapers, radio, and television, design and create posters; and
    • distribute tickets, design and execute the play program, organize an usher list.


    F/S (C, N, S)

  
  •  

    DT 105 - Theatre Practicum


    Credit Hours: 1

    Course emphasis is on participation in college theatre productions. Students will be directly involved in both technical theatre construction and stage acting performances. Students may enroll four times for a maximum of four semester hours of credit.

    Fulfills SUNY General Education -- The Arts.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • understand how to organize, schedule and prepare a production of a one-act play, reader's theater, or other dramatic genre for the college and the surrounding community;
    • create and perform a character from a written script employing techniques of character development, movement, line interpretation, memorization, and delivery;
    • construct, paint, and set up scenery, shift scenery during a show, and strike the set after the performance;
    • prepare the light plots, chart and cue sheets, hang and focus the lights and operate them during the show;
    • schedule and attend rehearsals, take all notes for the director, supervise cast members, set, costume, and prop constructions for the show as stage manager (s);
    • plan, secure, and make costumes, clean press, and mend costumes during the show, store owned costumes and return borrowed/rented ones;
    • plan makeup charts for each actor, obtain supplies, assist actors in application, clean the makeup room and store all supplies;
    • prepare property lists for each scene, and locate prop and furniture items including rehearsal props;
    • advertise the show in newspapers, radio, and television, design and create posters; and
    • distribute tickets, design and execute the play program, organize an usher list.


    Cycles (C, N, S)

  
  •  

    DT 106 - Introduction to Stagecraft


    Credit Hours: 3

    A study of technical theatre involving design for the set, lighting, makeup and costume with emphasis on the practical techniques essential to realizing those designs. The course will include stage construction and set painting, lighting techniques and practice, as well as methods for makeup and costume construction.

    Fulfills SUNY General Education -- The Arts.

    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • understand the concept of scene design and its relationship to the play and the theater;
    • understand the fundamentals of scene design, composition, space, unity, and interest;
    • analyze a play and develop a design idea from a written script;
    • develop the design idea with sketches, renderings, and models;
    • produce working drawings for the design including floor plans, sections, and elevations;
    • execute the design, construct and paint the scenery, and handle its movement properly;
    • work in a scene shop and understand the methods and materials involved in building and painting scenery, stage properties and special effects;
    • understand the function, quality, and color of light and its effect on the actor and the set;
    • use stage lighting instruments and dimmer control systems; and
    • design a lighting plan for a typical production on a proscenium or arena stage.

     

    F/S (C, N, S)

  
  •  

    DT 107 - 19th Century Russian Theatre


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course introduces the student to the original sources of Russian theatre culture and the peculiarity of Russian drama and its development. Selected works of Puskin, Gogol, Ostrovsky, Turgenev and Tolstoy with some foundation dramatists will be investigated through stage depiction with discussion.

    Fulfills the following SUNY General Education categories:

    • The Arts
    • Humanities


    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate an understanding of the achievements of Russian theatre;
    • use this knowledge as a vehicle for understanding the history, mentality, and manner of life of the Russian people;
    • demonstrate an understanding of the values of another culture (Russia);
    • demonstrate a familiarity with the major Russian dramatists of the 19th century through participatory "scene work" of selected plays;
    • demonstrate comprehension of the Russian mentality through the appropriate stage depiction of the characters of these plays;
    • describe the impact the play's director can have on the playwright's intentions; and
    • describe the influence the play's director can have on audience perception of staged action.


    Prerequisites: EN 110
    Cycles (C, N)

  
  •  

    DT 108 - 20th Century Russian Theatre


    Credit Hours: 3

    This course involves the main aspects of Russian theatre from the end of the 19th century through the first half of the 20th century. The content includes the Moscow Art theatre and its repertoire, the most outstanding achievements of Russian theatre during the soviet period and the method of Stanislavsky with its global influence on drama performance.

    Fulfills the following SUNY General Education categories:

    • The Arts
    • Humanities


    Course Outcomes
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • demonstrate an understanding of the achievements of Russian theatre;
    • use this knowledge as a vehicle for understanding the history, mentality, and manner of life of the Russian people;
    • demonstrate an understanding of the values of another culture (Russia);
    • demonstrate a familiarity with the major Russian dramatists of the 20th century through participatory "scene work" of selected plays;
    • demonstrate comprehension of the Russian mentality through the appropriate stage depiction of the characters of these plays;
    • describe the impact the play's director can have on the playwright's intentions; and
    • describe the influence the play's director can have on audience perception of staged action.


    Cycles (C, N)

 

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