Feb 22, 2020  
Fall 2017 Catalog 
    
Fall 2017 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

MT 119 - Mathematics for Elementary Education Teachers II


Credit Hours: 4

This course is restricted to students ultimately seeking a degree In Elementary Education. This is the second course of a two-semester sequence. Topics will include: basic probability and statistics; basic geometry; measurement graphing; and functions. Emphasis on problem solving, understanding the concepts and procedures of elementary mathematics, mathematical modeling, the use of manipulatives, and effective communication of mathematical ideas.

Fulfills SUNY General Education -- Mathematics.

Course Outcomes
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to 1:

Taken from: The Mathematical Education of Teachers from Conference Board of Mathematical Sciences in conjunction with the American Mathematical Society and the Mathematical Association of America

  • demonstrate visualization skills:
    • demonstrate the use of projections, cross-sections, and decompositions of common two- and three-dimensional figures; and
    • represent three-dimensional shapes in two dimensions and construct three-dimensional objects from two dimensional representations.
  • demonstrate familiarity with basic shapes and their properties:
    • identify fundamental objects of geometry;
    • demonstrate an understanding of angles and how they are measured;
    • demonstrate an understanding of plane isometries: reflections (flips), rotations (turns), and translations (slides)-and symmetries;
    • demonstrate an understanding of congruence and similarity; and
    • demonstrate an understanding of technical vocabulary and an understanding of the importance of definition.
  • demonstrate an understanding of the process of measurement:
    • demonstrate different aspects of size;
    • demonstrate an understanding of the idea of unit and the need to select a unit appropriate to the attribute being measured;
    • demonstrate a knowledge of the standard (English and metric) systems of units;
    • demonstrate an understanding of comparing units; and
    • demonstrate an understanding that measurements are approximate and that different units affect precision.
  • demonstrate an understanding of length, area, and volume:
    • demonstrate an understanding of one, two, and three dimensions;
    • illustrate rectangles as arrays of squares, rectangular solids as arrays of cubes;
    • demonstrate an understanding of the behavior of measure (length, area, and volume) under uniform dilations;
    • devise area formulas for triangles, parallelograms, and trapezoids; knowing the formula for the area of a circle; becoming familiar with formulas for prisms, cylinders, and other three-dimensional objects; and
    • demonstrate an understanding of the interdependence of perimeter and area; surface area and volume.
  • demonstrate the ability to design data investigations:
    • demonstrate an understanding of the kinds of questions that can be addressed by data;
    • demonstrate an understanding of creating data sets; and
    • demonstrate the ability to move back and forth between the question (the purpose of the study) and the design of the study.
  • demonstrate the ability to design data investigations:
    • Demonstrate an understanding of describing the shape of a distribution: symmetry versus skewed data distribution and what this indicates about the question being addressed;
    • Demonstrate an understanding of describing the spread of a distribution: range, outliers, clusters, gaps and what these indicate about the question to be addressed by the data;
    • Demonstrate an understanding of describing the center of a distribution: mean, median, and mode and what these indicate about the question to be addressed by the data;
    • Demonstrate an understanding of different forms of data representation, e.g., line plots, stem-and-leaf plots, among others; recognizing that different forms of representation communicate different features of the data; and
    • Demonstrate the ability to compare two sets of data (not always of the same size).
  • demonstrate the ability to draw conclusions:
    • demonstrate the ability to choose among representations and summary statistics to communicate conclusions;
    • demonstrate an understanding of variability; and
    • demonstrate an understanding of some of the difficulties that arise in sampling and inference.
  • demonstrate an understanding of probability:
    • demonstrate an ability to make judgments under uncertainty;
    • demonstrate an ability to assign numbers as a measure of likelihood; and
    • demonstrate an understanding of the idea of randomness.
  • demonstrate an understanding of functions:
    • demonstrate a conceptual understanding of what is a function; and
    • demonstrate the ability to read and create graphs of functions, work with formulas, and use tables of values.
  • demonstrate the ability to use manipulatives to develop understanding of mathematical concepts throughout the course.

Technology Objectives:

  • demonstrate the ability to use the arithmetic operations on the scientific calculator to solve algebraic and real world algebraic problems;
  • demonstrate an understanding of the keys

    √n ,x2,yx,π,±,%, (  ) 2nd inv key; and
     
  • demonstrate an understanding of order of operations on the scientific calculator.

 

Prerequisites: MT 118 or appropriate college equivalent and/or appropriate mathematics level code.*
F/S (C, N, S)

*Level code is determined by Mathematics Department placement test and/or successful completion of math courses.